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Majid Khan's Catch-22

Two months ago, TalkLeft introduced you to Majid Khan, a Baltimore resident who was detained in secret overseas prisons before he was moved to Guantanamo. Earlier this month, TalkLeft chided the government's effort to preclude Khan's defense lawyers from talking to him.

An editorial in today's Appleton Post-Crescent takes up the cause:

The reason [for preventing contact between attorney and client], as offered by an "information review officer for the National Clandestine Service," is because he was held in a "top secret" program and "may have come into possession of information, including locations of detention, conditions of detention and alternative interrogation techniques." And the government wouldn't want his attorney to reveal any of that information in court because of national security.

So the U.S. captured Khan, put him in a hiding spot for three years, finally allowed him legal representation to — we presume — defend himself, but doesn't let him talk to that legal representation because the U.S. captured him and put him in a hiding spot for three years.

Give it up, President Bush. When you've lost Appleton, Wisconsin, you've lost pretty much everyone.

The editorial's closing words:

[T]o simply capture people from around the world with some vague accusations about being involved in terror and essentially erase their humanity — their very existence — without due process is un-American, plain and simple.

And holding them responsible for being captured by us with no charge, put in our secret prisons and "interrogated" by us is self-serving and totalitarian, actions that are more reminiscent of the very regimes we rail against than our own proud justice system.

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  • Did I say (5.00 / 1) (#4)
    by aw on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 08:09:10 PM EST
    Edgar????  

    Huh? (1.00 / 1) (#10)
    by jimakaPPJ on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 08:30:15 AM EST
    Shall we take a look at this. From the post.

    First, we note that he was a "Baltimore resident."
    I think that comment means that he was not a citizen. Perhaps, or perhaps not, he was in the country on a green card. Anyone know?

    We then see that he was "captured." Now from that the implication is that he was picked up on the battlefield, or while fleeing, or some type of resistance before he was taken.

    Now if he has been captured, he is an illegal combatant. No ifs, no buts. And I'm supposed to worry about this guy?

    Worry? (5.00 / 2) (#11)
    by Peaches on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 08:57:21 AM EST
    And I'm supposed to worry about this guy?

    Did you worry about Brandon Mayfield

    You make a lot of assumptions about Khan. Perhaps they are true. If your assumptions are true, then maybe there is no reason to worry about him. However, when we have cases like Mayfield, who could still be held without cause, if it was not for the diligent work of the spanish police who finally put a different name to the fingerprints in Madrid. I know Jim your position on the War and terrorism. It is pointless to argue. For now, you and I don't have to worry about being picked up and placed in some internment camp never to be heard from again, because we are not Muslim. Perhaps, if your people remain in power, you will never have to worry about being held without cause, since you are a Patriot who doesn't question this war of the way it has been conducted. I however, do worry that circumstances could change and the ones who speak out against the government will eventually be the target of the the military Tribunal, the patriot and similar acts. I think, you should as well, because sometime circumstances take dramatic turns, such as in Iraq, where now it is the Shia who are in control and operating no different tha Saddam in terms of methods. Torture, fear, and control of information are all legitimate methods for obtaining security for some members of Iraqis, now. What I am saying is that the laws written now by this administration in the name of security can be used for sinister reasons by whoever obtains power in the future. That is what you should worry about. Pointless to make this argument to you, but I thought it worth saying anyway.

    Parent

    Peaches and ifs and buts (1.00 / 0) (#15)
    by jimakaPPJ on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:16:45 AM EST
    Peaches - Follow the llinks provided back and we find this:

    Ali said his son had been in Pakistan less than a year when, in 2003, he was arrested by Pakistani authorities.

    At one point, in seeming contradiction, he said of his son, "He has been brainwashed." He also acknowledged that a relative is affiliated with al-Qaeda. Authorities last week described that unidentified relative as an uncle, but Ali said the relationship is more distant.

    Peaches - You provide a lot of strawmen and ifs and buts...

    Parent

    But, but, but (none / 0) (#21)
    by Peaches on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:52:02 AM EST
    Jim,

    It is not an if. The if is Brandon Mayfield. Did you worry about that guy?

    Parent

    What, me worry? (5.00 / 1) (#14)
    by Repack Rider on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 09:54:09 AM EST
    And I'm supposed to worry about this guy?

    Only if you value the Constitution, justice, human rights, and everything America stood for until 2001.

    If you hate America so much, why are you still here?

    Parent

    See Peaches (1.00 / 0) (#16)
    by jimakaPPJ on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:19:32 AM EST
    RePack - I save my worry for citizens of the US who may find themselves in trouble. Read my response to Peaches.

    Parent
    Pretty simple and straightforward (none / 0) (#20)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:31:01 AM EST
    I save my worry for citizens of the US who may find themselves in trouble.

    Carefull there. You might slip up and actually make some progress, and end up having to work even harder at remaining in denial.

    See Jose Padilla.

    Or this guy.

    Unless of course, you're absolutely determined to find a way to miss the point. Some way. Any way will do I suppose. Denial works that way.

    Parent

    I guess people will just tell all sorts... (none / 0) (#28)
    by Bill Arnett on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 01:01:32 PM EST
    ...of tales when the bamboo splints start sliding underneath the fingernail...

    Parent
    Yes indeed... (none / 0) (#30)
    by desertswine on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 01:08:47 PM EST
    The Agonist has a video up of a middle-eastern man being tortured. I won't link to it because I find it highly disturbing.

    But I'm sure Bush would approve.

    Parent

    Appleton (none / 0) (#1)
    by Che's Lounge on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 07:40:01 PM EST
    is not as conservative as you think. They once called for consevative letters to the editor because everyone who was writing in was against the war. I think TL may have covered it, but I'm late for class and cannot check the archives. Did you know that Milwaukee had a socialist mayor for 20 years?

    I miss WI, but not this time of year. WI has two seasons;

    Winter, and July.

    TTFN

    Pretty simple and straightforward. (none / 0) (#2)
    by Edger on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 08:03:01 PM EST
    But i'm sure some will, with a bit of effort, find a way to miss the point.

    Oh, (5.00 / 1) (#3)
    by aw on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 08:08:38 PM EST
    Fiddle-dee-dee, Edgar.

    Parent
    Still (1.00 / 0) (#18)
    by jimakaPPJ on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:24:56 AM EST
    aw - Still demonstrating your great knowledge of a 70 year old book I see.

    Astounding.

    Parent

    Still (none / 0) (#23)
    by aw on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 11:43:29 AM EST
    Oblivious to the sonic boom overhead.

    Parent
    It's loud enough to... (none / 0) (#24)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 11:51:56 AM EST
    I think (none / 0) (#25)
    by aw on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 11:54:20 AM EST
    I just got a hernia.

    Parent
    Ok (none / 0) (#26)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 11:57:59 AM EST
    I'll stop now. ;-)

    Parent
    Man (none / 0) (#27)
    by aw on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 11:59:35 AM EST
    I have got to get something done around here.    I'll probably sneak back later, though.

    Parent
    we know who you meant ... (none / 0) (#8)
    by Sailor on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 11:00:09 PM EST
    ... and what you meant.

    It's too late to apologise, yur on the terrrist watchlist now buddy!

    Parent

    Let them watch. (none / 0) (#9)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 07:43:34 AM EST
    I'll bet where I'm standing there at least a couple of hundred million or more other people too. ;-)

    Parent
    Besides... (none / 0) (#5)
    by Edger on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 08:21:45 PM EST
    ...it's not like Majir Khan is a human being or anything, right? He's a terrist, right? Bush said so, right? And Bush must be right, right? He must be right since he said so, right?

    Right?

    I'll get this right eventually........

    ^^
    OO

    Parent

    Give it up, (none / 0) (#6)
    by Edger on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 08:44:51 PM EST
    nope (none / 0) (#7)
    by Jen M on Thu Nov 30, 2006 at 09:43:23 PM EST
    we gave the president the power to determine who is human or not.  Because after all, only humans have rights, yes?

    Parent
    Majid Khan... (none / 0) (#12)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 09:19:28 AM EST
    Pretty simple and straightforward.

    But I'm sure some will, with a bit of effort, find a way to miss the point.

    On October 3, 2006, the Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) announced it has filed a habeas corpus petition on behalf of Majid Khan in DC District Court, one of the 14 'ghost detainees' President Bush recently transferred to Guantánamo. Filed hours before the passage of the Military Commissions Act of 2006, the petition challenges the constitutionality of denying non-citizen detainees the right of habeas corpus. Mr. Khan was imprisoned in secret CIA detention for 3 1/2 years and subjected to "alternative interrogation methods" that amount to torture. He has never been formally charged with a crime or declared an enemy combatant.
    ...
    Majid Khan immigrated with his family to the United States in 1996. They settled in Baltimore, where he attended Owings Mills High School, graduating in 1999. Majid was granted legal asylum in the U.S. in 1998 and subsequently worked for the State of Maryland. In 2002, he went to Pakistan to get married and then came home to the United States to continue working. Shortly after returning to his wife in Pakistan, Majid and other relatives were kidnapped from their residence.

    In the middle of the night, on March 5, 2003, individuals identified as Pakistani security officials pounded on the door of the home of Majid's brother in Karachi, and rushed into the flat. The family members at home included Majid, his brother, his brother's wife and their month-old daughter. As the family was trying to wake up, the officials hooded and bound all of them before placing them in a vehicle. They were all taken to an unknown location.

    Majid's sister-in-law and infant niece were imprisoned for a week. Pakistani officials imprisoned his brother for approximately one month. When Majid's brother was released, officials threatened him not to make any public statements or inquire after Majid. As a result of the threats, Majid's family in Baltimore and Karachi waited anxiously and fearfully for his return. He was never released or heard from again.

    Back home in the U.S., Mr. Khan's family cooperated with U.S. authorities in every way they could; Majid's older brother, a U.S. citizen, was interviewed hundreds of times by the FBI and asked repeatedly about Majid's whereabouts. Nonetheless, Majid's family did not learn he was in U.S. custody or even that he was alive until a news reporter knocked on their door and told them President Bush announced Majid's name in a speech before the nation on September 6th.
    ...
    Majid now has a young daughter he hasn't seen.

    Legal asylum in America.
    No battlefield.
    No enemy comabatant.
    No fleeing.
    No resistance.
    No rights.
    Grabbbed from his fu*king BED while sleeping beside his wife in the middle of the night.

    IOW, not as human being.

    I'll get this right. Eventually...

    ^^
    OO


    edger omits (1.00 / 0) (#17)
    by jimakaPPJ on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:22:27 AM EST
    Ali said his son had been in Pakistan less than a year when, in 2003, he was arrested by Pakistani authorities.

    At one point, in seeming contradiction, he said of his son, "He has been brainwashed." He also acknowledged that a relative is affiliated with al-Qaeda. Authorities last week described that unidentified relative as an uncle, but Ali said the relationship is more distant.

    Try reading all the info.


    Parent

    SO? (none / 0) (#19)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 10:25:17 AM EST
    Minor details work for CYA, do they?

    Thanks for clearing that up.

    Parent

    a relative is affiliated with al-Qaeda. (none / 0) (#22)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 11:20:57 AM EST
    I once knew a guy who had a... (none / 0) (#29)
    by Bill Arnett on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 01:05:58 PM EST
    ...brother who was dating this girl whose cousin heard from a neighbor of a friend of his...

    Parent
    AMNESIA (none / 0) (#13)
    by Edger on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 09:39:02 AM EST
    Never mind what they said
    Forget about the things you read
    It was something youll never know
    Never see, never understand
    Just leave it now if you can

    Tell me
    When they come for you
    Who will there be to speak
    And when they come for you
    Who will there be left to speak for you?

    The final solutions back in style
    We are the ones letting it ride
    I never knew we were so blind
    Amnesia in comfort, so unkind



    Appleton Post-Crescent (none / 0) (#31)
    by bronco214 on Fri Dec 01, 2006 at 03:15:09 PM EST
    How the times are changing. The Post was, is and always will be a rightwing, Republican tool. It was really suprising to see them stand up for the Bill of Rights.
                         Neenah WI