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Friday Night Open Thread

It's the last weekend of summer. Sure went by fast.

President Obama visited Westchester, NY today and the Secret Service reported they are investigating a threat against him and searching for a 2014 Volkswagon Jetta. Obama then went to Rhode Island and is expected to leave there tonight. Some news reports say the person is armed. Some say the car is blue, others say it is silver.

This is an open thread, all topics welcome.

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  • Excerpt from McCain/Graham (5.00 / 2) (#2)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:33:44 AM EST
    Op ed in NYT:

    It is a truism to say there is no military solution to ISIS. Any strategy must, of course, be comprehensive. It must squeeze ISIS' finances. It requires an inclusive government in Baghdad that shares power and wealth with Iraqi Sunnis, rather than pushing them toward ISIS. It requires an end to the conflict in Syria, and a political transition there, because the regime of President Bashar al-Assad will never be a reliable partner against ISIS; in fact, it has abetted the rise of ISIS, just as it facilitated the terrorism of ISIS' predecessor, Al Qaeda in Iraq. A strategy to counter ISIS also requires a regional approach to mobilize America's partners in a coordinated, multilateral effort.


    A comprehensive read (5.00 / 2) (#21)
    by KeysDan on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:54:00 PM EST
    of Lindsey McCain's op ed (Stop Dithering, Confront ISIS, August 30), suggests to me that the "truism" introduction about no military solution to ISIS was just disingenuous dithering until they could get down to the brass tacks-- bomb, bomb, bomb.

    Not just tactical or half-measures. Let's not monkey around. We need strategic and full measure, and we need to do so in Iraq, Syria, wherever they are, whatever it takes.  But, relax, they are not advocating (in fact, they assure us that no one is) for a unilateral invasion, occupation or nation-building (although that seems to contradict their introduction).

    No, siree, not unilateral, but multilateral with "partners" who will be the boots on the ground. As we know,  there are plenty of boots (and other parts of uniforms) left on the ground as our Iraqi partners fled in the face of gun fire.  And, of course, all that military hardware left for ISIS pickings. Peshmerga gives big hopes, provided they are not on their own.

    And, regional partners are key, say Lindsey McCain, but, hold your horses, that does not mean all regional forces.  Iran is a no, no, even though they are part of the key.  

    Lindsey McCain  want us to know that their simplistic solutions are not so simple, and "we need to face facts."  A comprehensive strategy will require more troops, assets, resources and time. Wars and bombs, after all, do not come cheap, as if war-weary and economically challenged Americans need that reminder.  No mention of costs in lives, unless that is included under resources, or assets.

    The model for knocking off ISIS that Lindsey McCain have mapped out for us is Afghanistan in 200l, where we routed  an extremist army, called the Taliban. And, the icing on their comprehensive cake is that this gives us an opportunity to "revise"  that old and dated, AUMF, which we have been using, to handle terrorism wherever Lindsey McCain see it brewing.

    Parent

    Why on earth would I take the advice (5.00 / 6) (#25)
    by ruffian on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:06:08 PM EST
    (I think I spelled it right) of people that have been wrong about EVERYTHING so far?

    Parent
    According to these teo, W turned it around (5.00 / 1) (#26)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:08:52 PM EST
    in Iraq.  

    Parent
    It all depends on what your definition of (5.00 / 4) (#29)
    by Mr Natural on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:14:39 PM EST
    it, is.

    Parent
    and around...and around...and around (5.00 / 2) (#31)
    by ruffian on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:15:06 PM EST
    no wonder they are dizzy.

    Parent
    The McCain plan (5.00 / 6) (#32)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:15:15 PM EST
    Nation building AGAIN.  Because it worked in every conflict he has ever had any involvement in :)

    This, from the guy who went shopping in body armor to show how safe Iraq was :). And had his photo taken with ISIS when he was trying to make the Obama administration look bad when they wouldn't arm them or support them :). Does anyone who listens to him remember any of these things?

    While shopping in Kevlar, wasn't it Graham who wanted to buy the proverbial ME rug?  The whole party is such a bunch of jack ups I can't keep the circus performances straight anymore.

    Parent

    McCain is a head case. (5.00 / 4) (#33)
    by desertswine on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:20:39 PM EST
    If only we had not gotten out so early.... (5.00 / 2) (#34)
    by ruffian on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:21:04 PM EST
    and in their mind less than 50 years was early!

    Parent
    I know, and the Army was broken (5.00 / 3) (#36)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:29:05 PM EST
    And so was everyone's Natl Guard.  It would have required a draft.

    Republican voters forgot the soul destroying months of endless American blood, limbs, minds, and lives.  And they are also coming for Veterans benefits now and military retirements WHILE saber rattling.

    What sane person listens to these bastards and how could there be so many insane voters?

    Parent

    Really?? (none / 0) (#109)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:27:40 AM EST
     
    It would have required a draft.

    Surely you don't believe that.

    The problem wasn't the need of a draft. The problem was Obama's wrong headed belief that when He Spoke the ISIS of the world would turn their beheading knifes into plowshares.

    How stupid.

    "With regards to Iraq, you and I agreed, I believe, that there should be a status of forces agreement," Romney told Obama as the two convened on the Lynn University campus in Boca Raton, Fla., that October evening. "That's not true," Obama interjected. "Oh, you didn't want a status of forces agreement?" Romney asked as an argument ensued. "No," Obama said. "What I would not have done is left 10,000 troops in Iraq that would tie us down. That certainly would not help us in the Middle East."

    And now Obama doesn't remember:

    On Thursday, Obama addressed reporters in the White House Briefing Room about Iraq's latest crisis. "Do you wish you had left a residual force in Iraq? Any regrets about that decision in 2011?" a reporter asked. "Well, keep in mind that wasn't a decision made by me," Obama said. "That was a decision made by the Iraqi government."

    Link

    `But "glory" doesn't mean "a nice knock-down argument,"' Alice objected.

    `When I use a word,' Humpty Dumpty said in rather a scornful tone, `it means just what I choose it to mean -- neither more nor less.'

    `The question is,' said Alice, `whether you can make words mean so many different things.'

    `The question is,' said Humpty Dumpty, `which is to be master - - that's all.'

    - Through the Look Glass - Lewis Carroll.

    Parent

    It is appropriate (5.00 / 1) (#110)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:35:14 AM EST
    that you quote a work where things are the opposite of the real word when you defend your version of the Iraq War.

    Parent
    And you know (none / 0) (#137)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:43:18 PM EST
    my "version" of the Iraq war??

    How do you know that??

    Are you a mind reader??

    Trolling becomes you.

    Parent

    I'm referring to the great number of posts (5.00 / 2) (#142)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:05:20 PM EST
    on this site where you've made clear your version of the Iraq War  time and time again. If literacy is telepathy, then
    call me Kreskin.

    Parent
    I call you someone who makes (2.00 / 0) (#152)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:29:35 PM EST
    false claims and who tries to pick a fight with me by baiting.

    As for literacy, you may be able to read but I doubt you know what you have read.

    Big difference.

    Parent

    Just what you've written here (5.00 / 3) (#162)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:49:36 PM EST
    and at your blog, Tall Cotton.  

    Anybody who can Google can determine which one of us is being truthful here, James.  Fulminate all you want to but you can't change your record here and there.

    Parent

    Except for that one, minor detail (5.00 / 1) (#112)
    by Yman on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:44:46 AM EST
    It's encouraging how much James (5.00 / 1) (#113)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:49:38 AM EST
    respects the concept of democracy, except when the practical results aren't to his liking.

    Parent
    You weren't staying there Jim ant longer (none / 0) (#129)
    by Militarytracy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:05:35 PM EST
    You didn't have the soldiers willing to sacrifice their lives for, and now you can't even tax enough to keep those who returned home wounded alive.  And you want destroy the pensions of those who made a career out of military service.

    Parent
    MT, nice try (none / 0) (#140)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:52:59 PM EST
    but making wild claims and changing the subject isn't answering the question.

    BTW - Obama got every penny he asked for the VA. And this did happen....

    the Obama administration floated a proposal to save the federal government an estimated $540 million per year by billing veterans' private insurance companies for the

    Link

    Parent

    It's not wild claims at all (none / 0) (#148)
    by Militarytracy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:48:38 PM EST
    I have no idea what you are talking about.

    Parent
    My questions was to this: (2.00 / 0) (#156)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:36:26 PM EST
    The US used its soldiers for cannon fodder (none / 0) (#50)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:35:58 PM CST
    Too in WWII.  Decisions were made knowing we would lose 50% or more and they ran with it.

    Where and when??

    Your wild claims are obvious.

    Parent

    You replied to the Iraq War comment (5.00 / 1) (#174)
    by Militarytracy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:33:56 PM EST
    You had no American soldiers willing to die in Iraq any longer, and now Veterans are being told they cost too much.  They attempted to cut benefits once and mostly military spouses beat them back by creating the organization Keep Your Promise.  We began making videos of our families....our children, who also paid a price when their mothers and fathers were sent to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan.  And we held back the first attack on benefits, but it continues.

    You had no soldier will and no more treasure to stay in Iraq either.

    It had become a national issue too because our troop strength and readiness had become so broken.

    Parent

    Perhaps McCain missed the outcome (5.00 / 2) (#45)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:14:41 PM EST
    of our staving off communism in Vietnam.  He was in prison after all.

    Parent
    And he was stressed (none / 0) (#46)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:16:28 PM EST
    Prolonged stress can make you forgetful :)

    Parent
    Today I saw a very interesting (5.00 / 2) (#49)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:27:16 PM EST
    exhibit on WWI from the Austrian point of view. Cannon fodder. People starving at home. Electric shock for PTSD. Only the wealthy could afford prosthetic limbs. One woman, whose father was severely injured,wanted to go into combat. She was a hunter and markswoman. She succeeded in enlisting and being sent to the front. Was injured. Had a leg amputated. Spent the rest of her life n Salzburg. Could never come to any peace in her mind re that useless conflict.

    Parent
    The US used its soldiers for cannon fodder (none / 0) (#50)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:35:58 PM EST
    Too in WWII.  Decisions were made knowing we would lose 50% or more and they ran with it.

    Parent
    Usually... (none / 0) (#56)
    by unitron on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:58:25 PM EST
    ...those decisions (in WWII) were made because the outcome of not doing it would have been even worse.

    Parent
    Japanese used their troops (none / 0) (#104)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 07:42:34 AM EST
    To "die for the Emperor" in mass attacks that were of little value even on a tactical level during the last years of the Pacific War.  At least we didn't tell our troops that they were going to die in the service of a semi-devinity when we did send then off to war.

    Parent
    Where and when?? (none / 0) (#111)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:38:55 AM EST
    They were known as Banzai attacks (none / 0) (#114)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:56:46 AM EST

    It was first reported during the invasion of China that banzai charges worked extremely well, because the Chinese troops were poorly educated and undisciplined, breaking at the horrifying spectacle of massed blades. Conversely, during the U.S. raid on Makin island, on August 17, 1942, the U.S. Marine Raiders attacking the island initially spotted and then killed Japanese machine gunners. The Japanese defenders then launched a banzai attack with rifles and swords but were stopped by superior American firepower from M1 Garand rifles, Thompsons, and BARs that left dozens of Japanese dead. Following this defeat, the Japanese mounted a second banzai attack but once again, superior American firepower stopped the charge. Finally, the Japanese staged a third and final attack, which was also unsuccessful.[1]

    ............................................

    The last and largest Banzai attack of the war took place in the Battle of Saipan in 1944 where, at the cost of almost 4,300 dead Japanese soldiers, it almost destroyed the 1st and 2nd Battalions of the 105th U.S. Infantry, who lost almost 650 men.[3]

    Banzai Attacks

    Parent

    My question was to MT (none / 0) (#122)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:07:16 AM EST
    Yes, it was (5.00 / 1) (#52)
    by KeysDan on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:37:23 PM EST
    Miss Lindsey, who along with McCain, Congressman Mike Pence (R. IN), and about 100 troops, took a stroll through a Baghdad market.  Pence (now governor of Indiana) said it was just like a shopping center somewhere in Indiana, and, as his indicia of progress, Miss Lindsey extolled for all who would listen that "he bought five rugs for five bucks."    

    It is curious, that in their magisterial thesis, they encourage President Obama (if he does not want to listen to them, as foolish as that would be,) to  consult President Bush's advisers. But not Bush himself.  I would think that it would be best to hear it directly from the horse's mouth, so to say, with Bush having synthesized all that good thinking into a comprehensive plan.  Maybe, Lindsey has an extra five bucks an eye out for some Syrian rugs, too also.

    Parent

    It would certainly be from... (none / 0) (#57)
    by unitron on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:59:28 PM EST
    ...the horse's "something".

    Parent
    They've been saying the same thing (none / 0) (#3)
    by Jack203 on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 08:54:54 AM EST
    for a decade now.  

    A "comprehensive" plan.  OOh.  I'm so impressed.

    "It requires an inclusive government in Baghdad that shares power and wealth with Iraqi Sunnis"

    GW already tried the neocon reconciliation  strategy for the Sunni and Shiites for 8 years.  It essentially consisted of us policing the Sunni lands and paying off billions of US dollars to Sunni tribal leaders so they would be nice to us.
    Not suprisingly, when we stopped being the free police force and stopped paying off the Sunni tribes.  They started fighting the Shiites again.   How many more hundreds of billions of dollars do we want to spend to try and get the Sunnis and Shiites to play nice.  The money could be a lot BETTER spent at home.

    " It requires an end to the conflict in Syria, and a political transition there, because the regime of President Bashar al-Assad will never be a reliable partner against ISIS; in fact, it has abetted the rise of ISIS, just as it facilitated the terrorism of ISIS' predecessor, Al Qaeda in Iraq."

    Yes, all we need is a leader to unite, subjugate and pacify both the Sunnis (ISIS) and Shiites (Assad regime) in Syria.  Piece of cake!  Thanks Neocons for your input.  How many trillions and thousands of young men and womens death will this cost to impose Democracy in Syria?

    Neocon strategy has set the Middle East on fire.  Humpty Dumpty has fallen and there is no putting him back together again.  No more Iraq or Syria as the maps were drawn together by European colonizations.  As Biden brought up in 2006, let the Sunnis, Shiites, and Kurds have their own lands where they have the majority population is probably the only realistic solution.  

    We need to stop fighting the inevitable.

    Parent

    Very good op-ed. (none / 0) (#136)
    by Green26 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:41:45 PM EST
    I agree with most of it. I assume Hillary C. agrees with most of it too. It's time for Obama to listen to the experts (including many currently or formerly in his administration), formulate his comprehensive strategy, exercise good leadership, and work to execute the strategy. Time to stop tip-toeing, being cautious and being timid.

    I just saw a clip of Feinstein saying Obama needs to stop being cautious, in fact being too cautious, regarding ISIS. She also expressed support for the McCain-Graham plan.

    "Feinstein, a democrat, said she agreed with Senate colleagues on the opposite side of the aisle, John McCain and Lindsey Graham, who "laid the basis for confrontation" in a New York Times op-ed published Friday. "In that same newspaper is one by our secretary of state, John Kerry, and in that he does in fact lay out a strategy," Feinstein said.

    "And so hopefully, those plans will coalesce into a strategy that can encourage that coalition from Arab nations," Feinstein said.

    "ISIS "is a major varsity team, if you want to use those kinds of monikers," Feinstein added, saying Obama mistakenly characterized the terrorist group as a "JV team" in January."

    "This is a vicious, vicious movement, and it has to be confronted," she said. "I mean, [ISIS] crossed the border into Iraq before we even knew it happened. So this is a group of people who are extraordinarily dangerous. And they'll kill with abandon."

    The relevant article.

    Parent

    Experts (5.00 / 5) (#144)
    by Dadler on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:20:48 PM EST
    The "experts" are the same fools who murderously eff'd up Iraq and Afghanistan. When you can muster, say, two million boots on the ground, and convince every one of them that their job is to die before any civilians, well, call me. Hell, we can't even muster the rhetorical imagination needed to properly, and on a 24/7 basis, hammer home the necessary propaganda. And that's the EASY part.

    The belief that we can just, once again, hurl ourselves into a centuries, if not millenia old, sectarian religious war in the barely post-colonial middle east, that we can just wave some military wand to make a real difference, is powerfully and dangerously absurd IMO, and inexcusably so. Mostly because of, you know, history. This is a guerrilla war and state armies cannot win guerrilla wars on foreign soil where they lack the language and cultural skills to equally match the guerrilla forces...UNLESS they are prepared to be even MORE brutal than the guerrillas. And do you think we're prepared to do that? Or that even if we were that the blowback would not be worse? This is just common sense to me. I am a HUGE critic of Obama on almost everything, but I have no problem with him taking his time. There are NO easy answers, no matter what supposed "experts" say ("experts" who have ZERO track record of their "expertise" amounting to any lasting victory is ANY of these absurd foreign entanglements). As for Hillary, to me she is a co-dependent corporate blowhard, and I ignore her, as I do all corporate Dems, on literally everything, foreign and domestic. They are useless to the common good. To me, like almost all the rest, she doesn't possess a scintilla of the creativity needed here. And that's our trouble...we don't have that imagination ANYWHERE in our currently corrupt system, if we ever did. And without that, our freedom has really amounted to nothing in these situations. We cannot summon its strength of ideas, its map that could help us find our way out of common problems, or raise it proudly as our gift to the world...we cannot do any of this effectively because we have never properly used our freedom regularly, except in the belief that, "Oh, I get to choose between Coke or Pepsi, Mickey Ds or Taco Bell, now THAT'S freedom you commies and terr'ists!" We tend to treat our American freedom as nothing but a shopping mall directory.

    Also, as for Dianne Feinstein, it's pretty well known that she and her hubby are quite the war profiteers. Look it up, look up the mansion they bought with that blood money on SF's Gold Coast. Needless to say, she is one of those pols I will never listen to again. Hell, she only got pissed about spying when it came out maybe SHE got spied on. What a piece of nothing. Pfft. Her demise will be the only good thing she ever does for her country at this point.

    Peace to you and your family.

    Parent

    I've seen some of the clips (5.00 / 1) (#169)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:18:19 PM EST
    Of the war dances on the various morning gab fests.   While I don't agree with every thing he says Barry mcCaffrey makes some sense here

    especially the part about the fact That there is a fracturing of the post WWI boundaries and there is nothing we could or probably should do about that.

    Parent

    Feel free to continue (none / 0) (#149)
    by Green26 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:02:08 PM EST
    to hide your head in the sand, and ignore reality. Lots of the experts are currently in the Obama administration and the current military. Some are former ambassadors and former military, some of whom were in the Obama administration.

    Parent
    220 (about) here. 2000ish (none / 0) (#187)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:32:13 PM EST
    Cleaning out the pic file :-) (none / 0) (#188)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 09:05:39 PM EST
    Rabbit Domestication Study (5.00 / 3) (#9)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 11:18:00 AM EST
    Domesticated in 7th century by French Monks because the Catholic Church decided that rabbits were fish not meat..

    omestication of animals started as early as 9,000 to 15,000 years ago and initially involved dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. The rabbit was domesticated much later, about 1,400 years ago, at monasteries in southern France...

    ...In contrast to domestic rabbits, wild rabbits have a very strong flight response because they are hunted by eagles, hawks, foxes and humans, and therefore must be very alert and reactive to survive in the wild. In fact, Charles Darwin wrote in On the Origin of Species that "...no animal is more difficult to tame than the young of the wild rabbit; scarcely any animal is tamer than the young of the tame rabbit"...

    The team observed very few examples where a gene variant common in domestic rabbits had completely replaced the gene variant present in wild rabbits; it was rather shifts in frequencies of those variants that were favoured in domestic rabbits.

    An interesting consequence of this is that if you release domestic rabbits into the wild, there is an opportunity for back selection at those genes that have been altered during domestication because the 'wild-type' variant has rarely been completely lost. In fact, this is what we plan to study next, comments Miguel Carneiro.

    The scientists found no example where a gene has been inactivated during rabbit domestication and there were many more changes in the non-coding part of the genome than in the parts of the genome that codes for protein.

    The results we have are very clear; the difference between a wild and a tame rabbit is not which genes they carry but how their genes are regulated i. e. when and how much of each gene is used in different cells, explains Miguel Carneiro.

    link

    Dear squeaky, the world (5.00 / 2) (#11)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 11:41:32 AM EST
    definitely needs people like you!  So what kind of rabbits were in Watership Down?

    Parent
    Wascally Watership Wabbits? (5.00 / 3) (#12)
    by Mr Natural on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 11:46:25 AM EST
    Have Not Read It (5.00 / 2) (#16)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:46:51 PM EST
    But from what Wikipedia says about they are neither wild or domesticated, they are anthropomorphized.

    Parent
    No one ever anthropomorphized rabbits better (5.00 / 5) (#37)
    by Peter G on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:36:58 PM EST
    than Beatrix Potter. That woman was a damn genius at story telling, combining just the right behaviors of the actual animal (not just her rabbits, actually) with those of a human to make a compelling character, and then presenting it in a way that both adults and children can love. And I don't just say that because my name is Peter.

    Parent
    Story (none / 0) (#38)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:40:15 PM EST
    Been resisting telling this but it's now required.  When I briefly lived in Houston in the 70s there was a daytime tv show I liked (and could always watch because of my weird contract hours) because it was a train wreck waiting to happen. The Warner Roberts Show.  Story is a rich TX oil guy wanted his ditsy wife out of the house so he bought her a tv show.  
    The most famous incident happened with the fabulous Eartha Kitt.  She was booked for the show when in town but when she met Warner she said (paraphrasing) -line of  expletives- I will not go on camera with this woman.  Her manager explained that a contract had been signed and she had to.  FINE.  Said Eartha.  I will go on the show but I will not say a word.  So she did.  And it produced one of the most amazing live tv events in the history of TV.   The two of them sitting there scowling at each other for a flat 20 minutes.  I saw this live, high and literally ROTFLAMO.

    But there was another almost as wonderful.  Right after the publication of Watership Down she had Richard Adams on.  Adams walked out on the set (obviously for the first time) to find a set elaborately (and I do mean elaborately) decorated with seafaring props.  Nets, model ships, a giant ships wheel, life preservers (labeled SS Warner) and more.  Adams looked around and said "you haven't actually read the book, have you?"
    But then proceeded to rather graciously explain and discuss the book.

    The night before I left Houston to go back to NY I was in the hot gay dance club and there was Warner Roberts.  Totally buzzed I rushed up and gushed "OH MY GOD!  I'm do glad you are here.  I'm leaving Houston tomorrow and you are the ONLY thing I am going to miss".  It was the gods truth.  We danced until closing.

    Parent

    The web has been (none / 0) (#47)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:16:29 PM EST
    Pretty effectively scrubbed of all this.  Tho oddly when you search "Warner Roberts Show" you still get some unexplained links to Watership Down.

    One thing I did find is a link to a comment I made here in 2008 on the subject.  Oops.  Sorry.  It's that time of life for me.  

    Parent

    I couldn't really say I "loved" reading (none / 0) (#48)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:19:03 PM EST
    Beatrix Potter books to my kids, though I did it. I bet, if questioned, said off-spring would be pretty lukewarm on the subject.  

    Parent
    Pretty sure that I can say that I did love (none / 0) (#96)
    by Peter G on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:49:41 PM EST
    those books, and that our three daughters did, too.  They're all grown now; I'll ask them some time.

    Parent
    One of the best things about (none / 0) (#98)
    by Anne on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 08:55:25 PM EST
    having a grandchild is the opportunity to re-read all those wonderful books we enjoyed reading to our children: all the Eric Carle books (The Very Hungry Caterpillar, The Very Busy Spider, Brown Bear Brown Bear) - and those classics like The Runaway Bunny, Goodnight Moon - and of course, Beatrix Potter.

    Parent
    I loved them (none / 0) (#185)
    by Militarytracy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 06:43:56 PM EST
    I read them to my daughter but not Josh.  There was always so much PT and speech therapy to do.  I don't think Josh missed much not being read them.  Weren't you in love with her illustrations?

    Parent
    Should consider it (none / 0) (#19)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:51:59 PM EST
    One of my favorite books.  Never been a good movie for a reason.  Impossible.

    Parent
    How has it held up over the passage of time ? (none / 0) (#27)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:11:26 PM EST
    Who knows. But pretty gripping in its day.

    Parent
    Recipes (5.00 / 1) (#15)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:43:33 PM EST
    Paula Wolfert's Civit of Hare (wild)

    Paula Wolfert's Compote of Rabbit with Prunes (farmed)

    Parent

    Greek rabbit stifado (5.00 / 5) (#42)
    by Zorba on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:06:34 PM EST
    Most people may be more familiar with Beef Stifado, but it was originally made with rabbit.

    Rabbit stifado.

    (I nicknamed a couple of the wild rabbits roaming about our back yard "Stifado," just as a sort of warning.  Others, I nicknamed "Hassenpfeffer.")

    Parent

    Haha (5.00 / 1) (#51)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:37:20 PM EST
    I am not big on the cloves, cinnamon flavors..  But keep em coming.. as I love reading recipes..  and having cooking fantasies as well as cooking.

    I have a rabbit confit going at the moment but the next rabbit stew for me, will be this one: Rabbit Stew with Preserved Pears with Ginger Recipe

    And a good rabbit soup from Paula Wolfert:

    This is a simple soup from the tiny village of Poudenas in the Lot-et-Garonne. It is delicious and worth making whenever you intend to cook rabbit. Since the front legs and rib cage of rabbits have little meat but are very flavorful, they are better used for soup. The saddle and hind legs should be reserved for sautés.


    Parent
    Cooking nerd! (5.00 / 1) (#54)
    by Zorba on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:54:10 PM EST
    You're like me, we're both cooking nerds.   ;-)
    I, too, love reading reading recipes.  I have I don't know how many cookbooks, and I love to go online.  I still often visit the eGullet Forums you pointed me to awhile back.
    BTW, you can skip the cinnamon and cloves, if you want to.  My mom didn't use them.
    She made chicken stifado, as opposed to beef, since she was feeding seven people, and chicken was cheaper than beef.  And she didn't have a source of rabbits, although she no doubt would have used that if Dad was a hunter.    

    Parent
    Bugs Bunny was always (none / 0) (#55)
    by christinep on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:54:35 PM EST
    my favorite cartoon character.

    As many central and south Europeans do, my Aunt Lizzie (Slovenian/Italian) had rabbit pop up in a number of her dinners.  Plentiful, cheap, and (some would say) "good."  When my Dad and sister and I lived with Lizzie & family for a few years when first coming to Denver, the kids (us) would eat in the kitchen while the adults ate at a big table in the adjoining dining area.  When it was rabbit (oh, and especially, when polenta was there too) sister and I devised all sorts of ways to hide what we didn't/wouldn't eat.  Now: I love and salivate over polenta.  Still:  No rabbit.  

    Go B. Bunny!!!!

    Parent

    If Bugs shows up (5.00 / 1) (#60)
    by Zorba on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:23:32 PM EST
    In my garden and decimates it, he's dead meat.
    Mr. Zorba and Son Zorba are much better shots than Elmer Fudd.  Just sayin'.   ;-)
    But the Ghost Pepper Sauce concoction that we spray on the garden does seem to discourage the rabbits, and I suspect it would discourage Bugs, as well.
    Heck, it would discourage me, it's really hot stuff!

    Parent
    First, deer ... now, bunnies (none / 0) (#97)
    by christinep on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 08:43:03 PM EST
    Lordy, what next :)

    Parent
    We don't shoot the deer ourselves (none / 0) (#180)
    by Zorba on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 05:06:43 PM EST
    And since we started using the Ghost Pepper spray in our garden, we haven't had to shoot any rabbits, either.
    The pepper spray also keeps the deer off of our ripening fruit.
    We do, however, allow a neighbor and his family to hunt deer on our property.  They're the neighbors who rent our fields to make hay, keep an eye on our wooded areas, and apply lime to the fields every number of years.  They also keep an eye out for johnsongrass and help us eradicate it.  This is an invasisive species, and it's actually required by law in Maryland for land owners to get rid of their johnsongrass before it spreads.
    In return, we allow them to hunt deer here, and they supply us with boxes of packaged, labelled, and frozen venison.

    Parent
    May one legally bag a live rabbit in Manhattan? (none / 0) (#58)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:06:26 PM EST
    What music do you perform in conjunction w/a rabbit main course?

    Parent
    I'd doubt its legality, (5.00 / 1) (#61)
    by scribe on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:31:48 PM EST
    seeing as (a) it would almost certainly be living in a park and hunting is usually prohibited in parks, (b) rabbits are considered game animals and have seasons and bag limits and the season isn't open yet, (c) AFAIK there is no hunting allowed in Manhattan, (d) any kind of projectile launcher one might use to take a rabbit - shotgun, BB gun, .22, slingshot - or snare or trap is either illegal to have in Manhattan without a difficult-to-get permit or is illegal to use in NYS (e.g., snares).  Before the cops arrive you'd probably also get some serious grief from the locals while you were trying to bag Fluffy.

    Go to a good butcher shop.  Buy domestic.  I can get it on special at my local shop for 3.99 on special, normally 5.99.  Figure twice that in NYC.  They'll cut it to your order if you ask.

    Also - there is a significant difference between wild and domesticated rabbit.  The wild tends darker and a bit more flavorful.  The domestic is more of "another white meat".

    You can make a good ragu with rabbit rather than beef.  It's a favorite for winter, over tagliatelle.  Doing it that way also solves the "many small bones" problem.

    Parent

    As I understand it.... (5.00 / 1) (#103)
    by unitron on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 05:13:26 AM EST
    ...one traditionally chooses Wagner as a sonic backdrop when trying to "kill da wabbit".

    Parent
    Doubt It (none / 0) (#62)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:34:56 PM EST
    Although catching rats, mice and roaches is encouraged. Odd that pigeons are protected and rabbits too, I guess..

    It is illegal in New York State to injure, maim, mutilate, or kill any animal, but whether that includes rats, which the city itself tries to kill (and in fact encourages its citizens to do the same--step five of the city's rat control guide is titled "Wipe Them Out"), is uncertain. Reynolds says rat hunting with dogs is no more brutal than the other types of rat control. Rats caught in traps, especially those that use glue, can take days to die, and anticoagulants can also result in a long, arduous death, he says. "It's barbaric, cruel, and ineffective."....

    In City Hall Park, at 9:30 p.m., a small posse of dog enthusiasts has gathered under dim park lamps. They are members of a group who go by the noms de guerre R.A.T.S., an acronym for Ryders Alley Trencher-fed Society. Ryders Alley is a famously rat-infested alleyway in Lower Manhattan; "trencher-fed" is a 19th century term literally referring to a type of wooden bowl that was used to feed hunting hounds, but over time came to describe the hounds that lived together with their owners for use in group hunts. R.A.T.S. meets when its members can, sometimes as often as once a week. When they meet, they hunt, stalking New York's rat-infested alleyways and housing projects to chase down the city's pestilent whiskered menace.

    THE RAT HUNTERS OF NEW YORK

    Otherwise, the only way to hunt in NYC would be to join an organization like this: Wildlife Removal Services, MetroPest

    I did hear a story about a guy who used to go upstate and hunt squab (pigeons) for a chinese restaurant. The staff and cooks loved pigeon so they hired this guy to bring them birds. He had a drinking problem that was progressive. At one point he stopped going upstate to get his squab, instead he caught manhattan pigeons..  the restaurant did not know the difference..

    As far as what music to accompany rabbit dishes... hmmm.. have to work on that.  I have not paired specific music to food, and may not go there as it could be a bit gimmicky..  

    But worth thinking about..


    Parent

    NYT tells all: (none / 0) (#65)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:37:45 PM EST
    Good One (none / 0) (#67)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:46:59 PM EST
    My butcher sells 50-100 rabbits a week..  head on, of course. He supplies lots of restaurants.

    Parent
    Although we haven't eaten (5.00 / 1) (#72)
    by Zorba on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:17:37 PM EST
    rabbit in quite a number of years, ever since Mr. Zorba stopped hunting, I must say that it is a whole lot easier to clean and skin a rabbit than it is to pluck a chicken.  
    Been there, done that, and it ain't fun.

    Parent
    True story (none / 0) (#123)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:13:46 AM EST
    Been there and done that.

    Parent
    Did you (none / 0) (#200)
    by Zorba on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:29:50 PM EST
    scald your chickens first?
    Makes the feathers easier to pluck, although we dunked the chickens in cold water after scalding so the skin wouldn't cook.
    Still, the pin feathers could be hard to remove.  My fingers aren't terribly strong, and even gripping them between my thumb and a knife sometimes didn't work for me.  In which case I used a pair of needle-nosed pliers.  That worked.   ;-)

    Parent
    When you pluck pheasants (none / 0) (#201)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:40:43 PM EST
    there is no choice, you have to use scalding water to get the feathers off.

    Parent
    I remember reading that article about the (none / 0) (#69)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:06:31 PM EST
    rat hunts. Gotta keep those pointers sharp.

    Parent
    A Rat In My Soup (none / 0) (#70)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:12:46 PM EST
    Remember this one?

     

    POSTCARD FROM CHINA about restaurants in the Guangdong Province of China which serve rat... Writer visits the Highest Ranking Wild Flavor Restaurant and the New Eight Sceneries Wild Flavor Food City. They were next door to each other, and they had virtually identical bamboo-and-wood decors. Moreover, their owners were both named Zhong--but, then, everybody in Luogang seemed to be named Zhong. ...Both the Highest Ranking Wild Flavor Restaurant and the New Eight Sceneries Wild Flavor Food City serve, on average, three thousand rats every Saturday and Sunday, which are the peak dining days.... At the Highest Ranking Wild Flavor Restaurant, Ibegan with a dish called Simmered Mountain Rat with Black Beans.

    NewYorker (subscription to read whole article)

    Parent

    Here's music (none / 0) (#71)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:15:50 PM EST
    for rabbits:

    bunnyapproved.com

    Parent

    I have a girlfriend who raises rabbits for the (none / 0) (#186)
    by Militarytracy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 06:54:02 PM EST
    Dinner table.  She grows wonderful gardens too. She showed me once how you turn a rabbit onto its back and stroke it gently, it shuts down their nervous system somehow and their body completely relaxes.  And then she dispatches them.  I couldn't do it.  She raises some of the giant rabbits too.

    Parent
    Can't remember (none / 0) (#17)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:47:46 PM EST
    If I've said this before but as a child we raised and sold rabbits for eating.

    Parent
    No, You Did Not Mention It (none / 0) (#20)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:52:28 PM EST
    cool...   is this where you grew up?

    Parent
    Funny story (sort of) (5.00 / 2) (#24)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:04:26 PM EST
    Once when I lived in LA I was having a few friends over for a BBQ.  As now I had three big goofy dogs but I also had several rabbits.  Some time during the afternoon one of the rabbits got out of their pen and was instantly caught by the dogs.  I don't think the dogs even meant to hurt it but I think the poor thing died of fright.  
    Being the glass half full person I am I started talking about putting it on the grill.   A few of my guests being typically SoCal were HORRIFIED.  some left.  The ones who stayed enjoyed the BBQ rabbit.

    Parent
    Good Move! (none / 0) (#35)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:28:10 PM EST
    One of the most traumatic events in a close friend of mine's life was when one of her dogs got into the yard where she was playing with her favorite bunny..  She had 20 something of them... all pets..

    the dog grabbed the bunny by the neck, wounded it and dropped it, due to the screaming no doubt.... my friend picked up the bunny and it bit her hand quite deeply.. then died in her arms..

    she was six or so..

    Yes, she would have left your barbecue..  or may have saved the bunny..  she is fast.. hahha..

    No talk of cooked rabbit around her, ever.
     

    Parent

    I had six (5.00 / 1) (#39)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:54:34 PM EST
    I liked them a lot.  But they were rabbits.  Have to admit I would not have considered it if it had been any other pet.

    We all have our prejudices.  I blame my white trash background and don't apologize.

    Parent

    Ha (none / 0) (#22)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:57:18 PM EST
    We were not in the "preparation" business.  Thank god.  It was traumatic enough for me to have to sell them knowing they would be supper.  Sweet gentle things.  

    Oddly we never ate them.  Well, maybe once or twice if there was nothing else.  But generally not.

    Parent

    Did you see "Roger and Me"? (none / 0) (#28)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:12:36 PM EST
    I have (none / 0) (#30)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:14:57 PM EST
    My (none / 0) (#73)
    by Ga6thDem on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:33:43 PM EST
    dad grew up eating rabbit because his family was German. Apparently they eat quite a lot of them there. He never fed it to us though that I know of.

    Parent
    To this day I cannot eat either veal (none / 0) (#150)
    by caseyOR on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:23:18 PM EST
    or lamb. The reason? When I was a child visiting my grandparents' farm the calves and lambs were my friends. :-)

    Now, chickens are a whole different story. Collecting eggs was my farm job. Those chickens would flap their wings, and peck at my hands, and make the job as difficult as possible. I have no trouble eating chicken.

    Parent

    When I was a boy (none / 0) (#82)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:50:34 PM EST
    I had rabbit boxes (traps) which I caught rabbits in.  I would also hunt them with a 410 shotgun.

    Some we ate. Others I sold for .50 cents... you had to leave one foot on undressed to prove it wasn't cat.

    Also caught and sold possums. But my mom would never cook one.

    Parent

    Oliver Sacks, Temple Grandin (5.00 / 1) (#59)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:09:48 PM EST
    The rabbit domestication study is interesting because it suggest that there are switches in our genes (brain?) that can be reset to on or off.

    It makes me think of the Oliver Sacks subject who woke up one day with the heightened smell and taste ability of a dog. Also the subject was able to see 20 or more shades of brown.

    It lasted a week or two and then back to normal. The guy was a medical student (resident) and could tell who each patient was in his waiting room by smelling them through the closed door.

    Many animal abilities that Humans do not need as "domesticated" may be able to be switched on or off, once scientists have a better understanding of the switching process.

    Reading Temple Grandin's Animals in Translation for my book commentary for this course, I came across an interesting passage in which Grandin notes that on a very basic level, human beings and animals have the same kinds of brain cells--the same neurons--we just use them differently. Grandin concludes, "That means that theoretically we could have extreme perception the way animals do if we figured out how to use the sensory processing cells in our brains the way animals do" (63). She goes on to recount a story of one of her students who is severely dyslexic but has such acute auditory perception that she can hear radios that are "turned off"--that is, she can perceive the radio waves being received by the radio, even if the radio itself is not playing....

    Grandin cites a story from Oliver Sacks' The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat to offer her own explanation of this phenomenon. I own Sacks' book, so I thought I'd turn to the story myself, before looking for other examples.

    The story in question is called "The Dog Beneath the Skin." In it, Sacks describes meeting a 22-year-old medical student who, after an amphetamine binge, dreamed he was a dog and experienced, in his dream, all the unimaginable smells that dogs smell every day. Upon waking, however, he found that the smells were still there. For the next three weeks, his world was greatly enhanced: he could recognize people he knew by smell...

    link

    Parent

    My setter's nose knows (5.00 / 2) (#64)
    by scribe on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:37:03 PM EST
    when there's a cat on the porch across the street.

    25 or so yards away from our front room.

    When she's in the back of our house with no way to see across the street.

    In January.

    When the windows are closed and taped shut and the storm windows down and locked.

    And the double doors are equally tightly shut.

    Parent

    Yeah (5.00 / 1) (#68)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:54:10 PM EST
    Setters brain distribution is 97% nose, 3% other functions.. haha

    I had a dog (rotweiller mix) that lived with me when I was at school.
    He ran free, 500 acre campus with lots of woods. I lived on campus in a ground floor apartment and left my window open so the dog could come and go as it pleased.

    After my second year I had to take some academics and so the first day of the semester I set out to find my french class. Dog was wherever, nowhere to be seen..  I found the building, first time in it, class was on the second floor..  not a small building either..

    Halfway through the class I heard clicking on the linoleum outside the classroom.. Dog ran by with its nose in the air.. made a u turn and came into class and lay dow at my feet.

    I was amazed, as was everyone else.

    Parent

    Because it's been popping up often lately (5.00 / 4) (#10)
    by CoralGables on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 11:28:38 AM EST
    I'm going to play Anne for a day:

    Advise - verb
    Advice - noun

    I'll be quiet now.
    Go Gators :)

    Go Ducks and Beavers... (none / 0) (#79)
    by fishcamp on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:45:04 PM EST
    Podcast I just discovered (5.00 / 3) (#18)
    by ruffian on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:51:16 PM EST
    or rather, was referred to - Common Sense with Dan Carlin. He is an LA based  journalist I'm not sure I have seen before.  I heard him on Mike Pesca's podcast the other day, and he is very good at articulating the thoughts in my head, so no wonder I like it!  Sometimes he has interviews, sometimes not. The most recent podcast talks about Ferguson and also ISIS.  On Ferguson he makes a point I was trying to write here the other day, but gave up trying to write it - that the focus on the fine details of gunshot wounds and bullets might be interesting to people, but it totally misses the point that this one death was the last straw, not the initial cause of the problem.  He also makes the same point about the Rodney King case that I have tried to make many times. He is also very articulate on the militarization of the police.

    Really worth a listen- just cleaned two rooms of carpeting listening.

    Some hope... (5.00 / 1) (#23)
    by ruffian on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:57:59 PM EST
    I may have been too pessimistic about the chances of a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United. I did not know about the Article V provision to have state conventions without first having Congress pass the amendment. Dang, those founding fathers were smart. The Young Turks have a web site and effort going to get conventions in the states. Check it out!

    Earthquake party today (5.00 / 3) (#40)
    by nycstray on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 01:57:21 PM EST
    at the artist's Hub. Everyone is bringing their broken glass/ceramics and mosaicing :P The main piece will be a statue for our (my 'hood) recently opened community garden. Oh yeah, pot luck and drinks also. I'm thinking I can off load a couple bags of apples from the never ending supply on my tree :D

    You're just kicking the ladder after (5.00 / 2) (#143)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:07:19 PM EST
    making it to the top of the heap, in other words.

    You know nothing (5.00 / 2) (#154)
    by MKS on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:32:11 PM EST
    about the culture in what you call "SA" and "CA."

    You literallly could not locate those countries on a map. You said you had visited Latin America when you visted the Bahamas and Virgin Islands.

    But this doesn't stop you from saying you are an expert.

    The region of the country that has the biggest problem with immigration is the South.

    Hoey (1.00 / 0) (#158)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:42:08 PM EST
    I could be a blind man living in the middle of Australia and the problems of the CA and SA countries wouldn't go away.

    And your claim again ignores the context of my comment re visit.

    Nice try but no bananas.

    And yes the south, hard hit by Obama's recession, has been hard hit by undocumented workers taking low skill jobs from poor blacks and whites.

    When I replaced the roof on my house I had to go through 4 contractors before I found one who didn't use undocumented Hispanics.

    And I would say that's true with all the states and ships at sea.........

    Parent

    I see, your ancestors didn't bring (5.00 / 2) (#160)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:44:54 PM EST
    the problems of Ireland and Hungary with them, but these children and the other immigrants from south of the border will! because why not?

    Thank your for taking the time to explain your reasoning to me at some length.

    From the What Could Go Wrong Department: (none / 0) (#1)
    by Uncle Chip on Fri Aug 29, 2014 at 10:58:39 PM EST
    Red flag (5.00 / 1) (#8)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 11:04:14 AM EST
    'One of the things that we did notice when we were processing some of these students coming in was that they were adults,' she told CNS News at a press conference.


    Parent
    Sometimes you get what you voted for (1.00 / 1) (#41)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:00:16 PM EST
    The mayor of a city in Massachusetts has claimed that some illegal immigrants who have entered from
    Guatemala and are enrolled in public schools have greying hair and more wrinkles than her.
    Judith Flanagan Kennedy, mayor of Lynn, said that many attending the schools are not children, but federal government will not allow officials to verify their ages.



    Parent
    Literacy Is A Good Thing (5.00 / 5) (#43)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:08:35 PM EST
    At any age.

    Parent
    Maybe - so if you vote ... (5.00 / 2) (#63)
    by Yman on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:35:10 PM EST
    ... for a Republican mayor, you get all kinds of accusations without evidence?

    An anti-immigration group's imaginary scapegoats

    The surge -- which the Republican mayor blames on federal policy under the Obama administration -- has overwhelmed Lynn's public health and trash-collection infrastructure, and huge education costs have caused her to eliminate a community policing program. "I had a really solid financial backing for the city and then in the last couple of years it has all fallen apart," she said, bringing her to the "breaking point."

    But upon closer inspection, Kennedy's tale of woe doesn't quite add up. Those kids with wrinkles and gray hair? She admitted she hadn't seen them herself. And the "surge" of unaccompanied minors Kennedy has felt? It predates the actual surge at the border, which has been building for a couple of years but exploded only in 2014.

    The Department of Health and Human Services, which handles the placement of unaccompanied minors, says 135 unaccompanied Guatemalan children were placed this year through July 31 in Lynn, a city of 90,000 with a sizable Guatemalan population. Tallies weren't kept for previous years, but the figures probably were a fraction of the current level -- not exactly enough to cause mayhem in Lynn's schools, which have 13,500 kids enrolled, or to swamp trash collection.



    Parent
    These so-called children (none / 0) (#74)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:38:26 PM EST
    could be warriors in hiding,  according to this Republican.

    Parent
    Hooey (none / 0) (#77)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:41:10 PM EST
    'One of the things that we did notice when we were processing some of these students coming in was that they were adults,' she told CNS News at a press conference.
    'There were people with greying temples,' she added. 'There were people with more wrinkles than I have around their eyes.'
    Most of the immigrants coming into the schools from Guatemala were claiming to be between 14 and 18 years old, but the schools have no way of officially verifying their real ages.
    Ms Kennedy says they have been told by the Department of Justice that they cannot, and with the number of Guatemalan students almost doubling from 2012-13 to the last academic year, she warned that this could lead to an increase in taxes, in order to pay for their education.

    link

    Maybe if the Feds got out of the way of the locals and if Obama quit inviting more to come here we wouldn't have the problem.

    Parent

    Yeah, a system is over-burdened (5.00 / 3) (#83)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:51:27 PM EST
    by an increase in 1% of the student population in one year.  Do you really find this plausible?  

    Parent
    "Hooey", indeed - that's not evidence (5.00 / 1) (#85)
    by Yman on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:52:13 PM EST
    ... or even sufficient details to support her silly claims.

    A Republican mayor making unsupported allegations against the Obama administration on CNS is "news"?

    Heh.

    Parent

    Problem? (5.00 / 2) (#87)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 05:12:26 PM EST
    Solution:

    Hire more teachers!

    Parent

    Let all the Guatemalans come over (none / 0) (#88)
    by MKS on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 06:26:26 PM EST
    Dear everyone (none / 0) (#91)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:11:29 PM EST
    The point is that the undocumented are making things up as they go and that the feds are preventing the locals from protecting themselves.

    And since it is MA, then they got what they voted for. Obama carried the state twice.

    And since it demonstrates that these aren't children it shows how silly are all the claims that "we must protect the children."

    Now you can waffle and wiffle and dodge and duck and try to ignore but that is the plain and simple truth.

    My guess is that this country won't last 30 years.

    Parent

    Hooey (5.00 / 2) (#92)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:14:59 PM EST
    I would suggest the mayor is making things up as she goes along, and I'd like to know the last time CNS had an article that didn't have something bad to blame on Obama.  My guess is, never.

    Parent
    Goog lord (5.00 / 9) (#94)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:23:04 PM EST
    Do you even know how long people like you have been saying this?

    My guess is that this country won't last 30 years.

    Roughly as long as there has been people like you.   Don't worry Jimbo.  Everything will get along just fine without you.

    And me.

    Parent

    What will become of the U.S. (5.00 / 1) (#102)
    by oculus on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:01:13 AM EST
    in 30 years?  (Rhetorical question.)

    Parent
    In 30 years (2044) (5.00 / 1) (#117)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:05:57 AM EST

    After passing an amendment to Article 2 of the constitution allowing anyone, including non-citizens and corporations, over the age of 18 to run for president Clinton Hussein Mezvinsky, the gay son Chelsea and Marc Mezvinsky will, after defeating Toni Nathan Paul, the daughter of Rand Paul for the democratic nomination will go on to be elected the first gay atheist president of the United States after a bruising election battle with the republican "Great White Hope", Manuel Prescott Herbert Walker Samuel Pierce "Georgie" Bush.   Who, some say by questionable means, took the nomination from the heavily favored Walmart/Carl's Jr multinational conglomerate.
    Also passed that year was the repeal of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 14th Amendments.  In a disappointment for some an amendment repealing the "Citizens United" ruling was defeated for the 5th consecutive time.  Prompting the Walmart/Carl's Jr coalition to release a statement saying "it's not all bad news today for freedom loving Americans" .

    Parent
    Did you also write screenplays? (5.00 / 1) (#163)
    by oculus on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:51:13 PM EST
    Ha (none / 0) (#189)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 09:19:06 PM EST
    Dialog.  It's tough.

    Parent
    Side note (none / 0) (#121)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:36:39 AM EST
    Legal action is still pending concerning the violation of Walmart/Carl's Jr's civil rights by the Bush campaign in claiming that their opponents campaign slogan "Fvck You, I'm Eating" was an insulting affront to fine dining.

    Parent
    Someone will be... (5.00 / 1) (#179)
    by unitron on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 05:03:56 PM EST
    ...bemoaning whatever the then current state of affairs is, and saying...

    "My guess is that this country won't last 30 years."

    Parent

    Orwell had that pretty well covered. (none / 0) (#124)
    by Mr Natural on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:14:20 AM EST
    BS (5.00 / 3) (#95)
    by squeaky on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:48:30 PM EST
    One of the theme songs of wingnuttia has always been:

    "we must protect the children."

    Fear mongering 101.

    The progressives around you, PPJ, are saying

    No Human Being is Illegal.

    Parent

    Agreed (2.00 / 0) (#153)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:31:26 PM EST
    But humans can do illegal things.

    Parent
    "Plain"? "Simple"? Absolutely (5.00 / 2) (#99)
    by Yman on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 10:10:25 PM EST
    The "truth"? - nope.

    She, like you, makes nothing more than specious claims unsupported by actual evidence.  Repeating silly claims doesn't make them "the truth" - just repeated, silly allegations.

    Parent

    True, the Country (5.00 / 0) (#100)
    by MKS on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:03:25 AM EST
    will not last 30 years--as is.  Everything changes.  This country will change....because time always changes all.

    I have no doubt you fear the "new" America.  An America with many more Latinos and other minorities.

    Parent

    Ah yes (none / 0) (#106)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:12:01 AM EST
     An America with many more Latinos and other minorities.

    No problem if.....

    "Out of many, one" still applies.

    The issue isn't the ethnicity of the people.

    It is the lack of blending.

    The Left, in conjunction with our colleges and media has succeeded in the balkanization of America.

    Parent

    Yes, the American South and an American (5.00 / 1) (#107)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:16:01 AM EST
    Southerner like you can certainly teach us about the importance of 'blending'  into the greater American culture.

    Parent
    People (5.00 / 4) (#108)
    by Ga6thDem on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 08:24:21 AM EST
    with your backward mindset were saying the same thing a hundred or more years ago about the Germans and the Irish. They can't become "Americans". The truth of the matter is you're afraid of your neoconfederate visions going down the drain more than anything else.

    Ever been to NYC? It probably has the most multi ethnic community in the country. And NYC not only survives it THRIVES.

    Quit parroting Phyllis Schafly who says the new
    Americans don't have the same "values" that the neoconfederates have.

    Parent

    eh??? (2.00 / 0) (#132)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:28:08 PM EST
    with your backward mindset were saying the same thing a hundred or more years ago about the Germans and the Irish.

    GA, you continue to make things up. This is what I wrote:

    No problem if.....

    "Out of many, one" still applies.

    The issue isn't the ethnicity of the people.

    It is the lack of blending.

    I didn't say it couldn't happen.

    I said based on the current PC Balkanization and
    reservation culture being foisted on us by the Left it is unlikely.

    Parent

    Believe it or not, NYC is not the most (none / 0) (#125)
    by nycstray on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:22:46 AM EST
    Well, (none / 0) (#126)
    by Ga6thDem on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:29:19 AM EST
    but #9 isn't too shoddy either.

    Parent
    I was surprised when I learned that (none / 0) (#127)
    by nycstray on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:52:59 AM EST
    especially because I live in #1 on the list :P

    Parent
    Well, It Depends How You Define Diversity (none / 0) (#128)
    by squeaky on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:01:34 PM EST
    NerdWallet, a financial website for consumers, calculated which cities had the most equal distribution of residents across four common ethnic groups: Hispanic/Latino, White, Black, and Asian/Pacific Islander. It looked at Census data from more than 1,900 places. The more equal the percentages, the better their diversity score (with 100 being perfect).

    Somewhat eccentric definition, IMO

    Parent

    Define? (none / 0) (#130)
    by nycstray on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:14:26 PM EST
    Yes (none / 0) (#139)
    by squeaky on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:46:17 PM EST
    that is a better definition.

    Parent
    Snotty East Coasters (none / 0) (#155)
    by MKS on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:33:53 PM EST
    We got it all in California.

    Parent
    Jim, what do you think about this? (none / 0) (#120)
    by Angel on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:25:18 AM EST
    Why don't you ask squeaky?? (1.50 / 2) (#134)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:40:45 PM EST
    Or jondee??

    I doubt that their opinion of the KKK would be any different than mine.

    But since I have seen the results up close and personal rather than reading about it or seeing it on TV it would be interesting to see if a lack of real world experience is debilitating as I think it is.

    FYI, and it is none of your business, I watched by Father throw a supposed friend out of our home because he persisted in using the N word. I watched a union get installed where my Father worked in spite of threats and because of his and other's efforts.

    You see Angel, I have been there and done that. I understand the bad of segregation and racism THROUGHOUT the country and, having lived many places outside the south and came home I can see and appreciate the differences.

    I am a social liberal because of what I have seen and done.

    You folks are people of the Left who know only what you have been told.

    Parent

    Oh, I'm pretty sure their opinions would (5.00 / 2) (#176)
    by Angel on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 04:42:38 PM EST
    differ from yours based solely on your history of comments on this site.  Keep on telling us you're a social liberal if that makes you feel any better.  

    Parent
    Jim, have you ever been to Latin America? (none / 0) (#157)
    by MKS on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:36:46 PM EST
    MKS, I also have not (2.00 / 0) (#161)
    by jimakaPPJ on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:45:11 PM EST
    been a doctor yet I can recognize a quack.

    I have been to Mexico and Panama.

    Plus, quite a bit of time in PR but you folks seem to think that it's poverty is different.

    Parent

    And I'm a Leftie because (none / 0) (#159)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:42:10 PM EST
    of what I've seen and done as well.

    Parent
    Sounds pretty wild to me (none / 0) (#44)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:11:23 PM EST
    Of course, Michele Bachmann thinks that we are in the Last Days, and she was elected by good, God-Fearing Minnesotans.........


    Parent
    Cone Markers at Wilson SUV: (none / 0) (#4)
    by Uncle Chip on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 09:47:11 AM EST
    cones and shell casings at Wilson's SUV

    Why was this quickly marked by Ferguson PD and then quickly removed???

    It's not there 5 minutes after the shooting when cellphone video is rolling and looks to be farther than 35 feet away???

    There appears to be one cone marking the hat, one marking the cigarillo package???, one cone marking a shell casing ...

    And is that another shell casing there on the ground??

    That would make 2 shots at the door of the SUV.

     

    I don't see any shell casings in that pic, (5.00 / 1) (#84)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:51:33 PM EST
    nor do I see any cigarillo package.

    Interesting web site you found there.

    This thread plainly shows via photographic evidence that:

    Everyone who has said Big Mike had his "hands up" or anything related to "hands up, don't shoot" - were all clustered together in a parking lot just West of Piaget's apartment.
    One thesis is that the witnesses shared what they saw with each other and others immediately after the shooting and, consciously or unconsciously, that how they all ended up with such similar stories.

    Parent
    So then (5.00 / 0) (#89)
    by Uncle Chip on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 06:35:44 PM EST
    What do you think those 3 cones are marking???

    And what is circled in red on the left side of the photo???

    Your eyes are a good as your thesis:

    Because in the Black Canseco video taken a mere 3 minutes after the shooting is on the south side and down the street a ways and there is already discussion on that video that he had his hands up and was shot while on the ground.

    The prefabricator of that thesis falls flat.

    Parent

    No idea what the "Black Canseco video" (none / 0) (#101)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:04:53 AM EST
    is. Please link us to it.

    Parent
    The Black Canseco Video (none / 0) (#105)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 07:43:36 AM EST
    The Black Canseco Video

    that proves that the owner of that website is a moron.

    Parent

    The eye witness in what you call (5.00 / 1) (#133)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:38:19 PM EST
    The Black Canseco Video
    says that Brown kept coming at Wilson, despite all the bullets Wilson was firing at close range at Brown. This apparently seemed a bit incredible to the eye witness, and he commented that he thought Wilson was missing.

    This proves that Brown was coming at Wilson, to use your style of communicating.

    Parent

    Flight of Fantasy (none / 0) (#145)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:32:35 PM EST
    So then who chased whom 100 feet down the street from his SUV shooting as he ran at his fleeing target???  Who was the one rushing whom all that way???

    BTW how do you get a bullet hole above the window of that apartment from the front seat of a vehicle parked at that angle so far up the street???

    That looks to be a shot from outside the vehicle at a fleeing Brown.

    There goes the struggle myth --

    Parent

    The eye-witness said Brown was coming at Wilson and it seemed to the eye-witness that Wilson was missing Brown with his shooting, because Brown kept coming at him.

    Parent
    I thought a number of eyewitnesses said (none / 0) (#175)
    by Green26 on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 04:11:49 PM EST
    Brown was standing with his hands up. Can you link to specific witnesses who said Brown was coming at Wilson? I may have missed those. All I've seen are stories saying witnesses have supported the police view, but no specifics.

    Parent
    Yes, listen to the "Black Conseco" video (none / 0) (#183)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 05:56:13 PM EST
    that Uncle Chip linked to, what I wrote above is paraphrased what the witness in the video said. I would imagine the police and/or FBI have interviewed the man in reference to the video.

    As far as the 3 witnesses who have come forward to the press and said Brown had his hands up, there is a theory which may help explain that, see my comment #84.

    Parent

    The eye-witness said Brown (none / 0) (#177)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 04:49:24 PM EST
    was coming at Wilson and it seemed to the eye-witness that Wilson was missing Brown with his shooting, because Brown kept coming at him.

    Would that be before or after Wilson chased him over 100 feet down the road firing at him all the way???

    Do you have a name for that eye witness  or is it just some anonymous voice you hear on the tape??

    Parent

    Well, one cone is marking a hat, (none / 0) (#138)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:46:05 PM EST
    another cone is marking what looks like a flip-flop, and I see nothing by the third cone. If you see something there, please elucidate us.

    I have no idea what is circled in red on the left side of the photo, but it definitely is not a shell casing, unless Wilson was shooting some kind of an elephant gun.


    Parent

    casing shaped shell casings ever made. Almost looks like a "grill," or something.

    What do you think it looks like?

    Parent

    Those look like 2 shell casings (none / 0) (#146)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:36:55 PM EST
    that rolled together.

    That's certainly not a charm bracelet, is it???

     

    Parent

    Two shell casings that rolled together. (none / 0) (#168)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:18:01 PM EST
    Possible, say, many billions to 1, but not at all probable.

    Parent
    Please Proceed (none / 0) (#118)
    by Repack Rider on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:06:57 AM EST
    One thesis is that the witnesses shared what they saw with each other and others immediately after the shooting and, consciously or unconsciously, that how they all ended up with such similar stories.

    By all means provide us with that "thesis."  Who wrote it?  Was the person who wrote it present at the scene?  Did the writer have an agenda or a history of comment on this subject?  Where did the "evidence" for this "thesis" come from?

    If you know.

    Parent

    Uh, you are kidding, right? (none / 0) (#135)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 12:41:00 PM EST
    All of your questions are clearly answered in the link to Uncle Chip's website that I provided in my comment.

    Feel free to actually look at it before you comment on it.

    Parent

    Who are you kidding -- (none / 0) (#147)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 01:42:43 PM EST
    All of your questions are clearly answered in the link to Uncle Chip's website that I provided in my comment.

    Don't try to lay your stupidity off on me.

    I linked to the map of the crime scene on that site which is quite factual and interesting.

    It was you that was drawn to the moronic theses and idiocy on that site.

    So suck it up and defend it yourself.

    Parent

    Is your name Repack Rider? (none / 0) (#167)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:16:53 PM EST
    If not, please learn how  to read.

    Parent
    You mentioned me in your post -- (5.00 / 2) (#178)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 04:53:37 PM EST
    whenever you do that you can expect a response.

    Or do you think you can just hide from that???.

    Parent

    It is the website you introduced us all to
    do you think you can just hide from that???.


    Parent
    Which leaves us with that old addage: (none / 0) (#191)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 09:53:25 PM EST
    You can introduce a moron to information --

    But you can't give him the brains to understand it.

    Parent

    Exactly. The photo shows (5.00 / 1) (#198)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 09:36:18 AM EST
    two shell casings that rolled together.

    Haw!

    Which leaves us with that old, er, "addage:"

    No one is more blind than an Uncle Chip who chooses not to see.

    Parent

    Thanks for pointing that out, Eagle Eye. (none / 0) (#199)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:01:10 PM EST
    Such a vague comment. What, exactly, (none / 0) (#202)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 01:10:59 PM EST
    does "that" refer to in it?

    My guess at your intent is that either you, like most people, also see that it's clearly not two shell casings that rolled together in the photo, or you also see that Uncle Chip can't even spell correctly when he tries to insult someone. Which he apparently does 'cuz he's frustrated that the facts are against him.

    But no worries. Either one - or both, even - is fine by me.

    Parent

    Wilson's SUV Lost and Found??? (none / 0) (#119)
    by Uncle Chip on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:12:39 AM EST
    At 2:21 on:

    this video 5 minutes after the shooting is what appears to be Brown's baseball cap laying in the road in the distance to the left of the driver's door of Wilson's SUV.  

    The police Chief of Ferguson calls that 35 feet from the body. Who is he kidding??? That's closer to 100 feet.

    And worse yet the Chief was on the scene -- does he know how to count off steps or was he just straight out lying.

    Here's a later closeup shot of the baseball cap and  cone markings

    Is that Wilson's SUV still there in that picture???

    Parent

    Reverend Al's style advise (none / 0) (#5)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 09:54:48 AM EST

    For the president after the tan suit

    pretty funny

    Personally I would love it if he showed up in some if this stuff just, as someone said, to watch the heads explode

    Naww (5.00 / 1) (#66)
    by scribe on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 03:43:10 PM EST
    The Rethugs would have him in a red fedora with an ostrich plume.

    Parent
    The only thing the wingnuts (5.00 / 2) (#164)
    by desertswine on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 02:57:09 PM EST
    can find wrong with that tan suit..  is that the guy who's wearing it is a couple of shades darker than the suit is.  

    Parent
    Because as Charlie Pierce has been known to say (5.00 / 3) (#170)
    by MO Blue on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:19:49 PM EST
    .........it's not about race because it's never about race.



    Parent
    I got married in an off-white Linen suit (none / 0) (#6)
    by Mr Natural on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 10:39:14 AM EST
    I looked like Bogie, only better.

    I haven't worn it in years.  For a while I was looking less like Bogie and more like Sidney Greenstreet (Kasper Gutman in the Maltese Falcon) but I'm over that now.

    Politicians do tend to wear dark and forboding threads.


    Parent

    Did the marriage survive? (5.00 / 1) (#53)
    by oculus on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 02:43:58 PM EST
    It's still alive and well, Oculus, though (5.00 / 1) (#192)
    by Mr Natural on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:42:08 PM EST
    we've both grown and changed.  As the largely unknown duo Cryer and Ford sang in the 70s,

    "I've a scrapbook full of photographs,
    And none of them, not one of them, is me."


    Parent

    Sure (none / 0) (#193)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:49:10 PM EST
    they are

    Sitting here going through a trunk and culling the babies and landscapes I can't identify.  But with all respect to Cryer and Ford.  This is totally me.

    Parent

    Btw (none / 0) (#194)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:58:26 PM EST
    I'm wearing rubber gloves because a few months ago I had a mouse in the kitchen which I set traps for and eliminated.  This afternoon cleaning out the closet I found a nest and a couple of mummified baby mice in the photo trunk.  So we are culling and disinfecting.  It's slow work.

    Parent
    You should probably wear (none / 0) (#195)
    by fishcamp on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:21:12 PM EST
    some type of mask too since Hantavirus and Plague are possibilities around rodent droppings.  Plague is not a virus and can be cured with antibiotics but not sure about Hantavirus.  Both those diseases crop up regularly in the four corners area of Colorado.  

    Parent
    Now he tells me (none / 0) (#196)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 11:26:52 PM EST
    I have a white suit (none / 0) (#7)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 10:56:25 AM EST
    I, for some forgotten reason, got to go to the premier of the Disney movie Dinosaur.   I have worn it exactly once.

    Parent
    My little town is celebrating (none / 0) (#13)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:14:58 PM EST
    "Solemn Old Judge Days" as they always do this weekend of the year.  It is every bit as fun and exciting as it sounds like it would be.  The thing is all the civic minded men start growing beards the first of August and don't shave them until Labor Day.  I was just down town and I realized I will be glad to see Monday arrive because given the general fundie vibe around here it's a little to much like a leafy green Afghanistan.

    Come early (none / 0) (#14)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 12:36:45 PM EST
    stay late

    The festival is named for George D. Hay, who called himself the Solemn Old Judge and in a visit to Mammoth Spring in 1920 attended a hoedown that he later said was his inspiration for what became the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tenn. At the time he was working at a newspaper in Memphis and was assigned to cover a war hero's funeral in Mammoth Spring.

    The gospel singing will be 7 p.m. Friday at the multipurpose building at the Mammoth Spring School campus. Refreshments will be sold. To take part contact Jim Mills at 870-625-7278.

    Events Saturday include a pancake breakfast 6 to 10 a.m. at the fire station (cost by donation), sponsored by the firefighters.

    The Beaver Spring 5k Fun Run and Walk registration will be 7 a.m. and the start at 8. Registration fee is $15.

    An antique car show is set for the Mammoth Spring State Park. Gates will open 9 a.m. with judging 11 a.m. Trophies will be presented 2 p.m. There will be grilled hamburgers and drinks sold by the Spring River Lions Club and ice cream by Spring Dipper. All the shows and exhibits are free.

    At 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Crowbar Russell and the Clash of the Ozarks Clan will re-enact the early 1900s Citizens Bank robbery on Main Street.

    A quilt show will be 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Mammoth Spring Floral Express on Main Street. For quilt show entries contact Charlotte Hurtt at 870-625-3515.

    Music shows are scheduled at Keith Auto Sales throughout



    Parent
    I've got (none / 0) (#76)
    by Ga6thDem on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:39:08 PM EST
    to say that festival does sound like a big dud. I've seen farmers markets with more excitement going on than there.

    Parent
    I was only interested (none / 0) (#80)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:45:59 PM EST
    In the bank robbery.  I think it was rained out.

    Parent
    We did not agree that baby shaped (none / 0) (#75)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:38:52 PM EST
    Pears were creepy.  Perhaps we can agree these baby GIFs are

    Wait (none / 0) (#78)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:44:56 PM EST
    You're bad but that's good... (5.00 / 1) (#81)
    by fishcamp on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:49:48 PM EST
    Glad I'm back to just catching fish.

    Parent
    Very excited (none / 0) (#86)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 04:55:07 PM EST
    "Freak Show" will feature "American Horror Story" alumni Jessica Lange, Evan Peters, Sarah Paulson, Angela Bassett, Gabourey Sidibe, Frances Conroy and Kathy Bates. Newcomers include John Carroll Lynch, Michael Chiklis, Wes Bentley, Patti LaBelle, and Jyoti Amge, the world's smallest woman.

    Looks like Kathy Bates will be the bearded lady.  Awsum.

    A word about concern trolling (none / 0) (#93)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 07:18:39 PM EST
    Hands are being wrung that by casting Jyoti Amge in this show she is being "exploited".  I call bullsh!t.  First she is 20 yo (an adult in other words in spite of being 2' tall) and says her lifelong dream is to be an actress.  She has already starred in reality tv.  As far as the show title, AHS is an incredibly well written show that has a history of using people with disabilities in wonderful parts the likes of which they will find no where else.   One of the regulars has Downs Syndrome and she is one of my favorite characters.  Another is massively overweight.  Both play parts that virtually ignore these things and let them act in wonderfully complex parts.  I expect it will be so with Jyoti.  AHS will not take an exploitative approach to this subject.  She will be working with some of the best actors in the business.
    AHS has won 40+ awards and been nominated for 130+.  It's not a bad gig.  
    IMO some of this is as much about jealousy as concern.

    Parent
    Pretty much (none / 0) (#90)
    by CaptHowdy on Sat Aug 30, 2014 at 06:50:44 PM EST
    Under the relentless thrust of accelerating over-population and increasing over-organization, and by means of ever more effective methods of mind-manipulation, the democracies will change their nature; the quaint old forms--elections, parliaments, Supreme Courts and all the rest--will remain. The underlying substance will be a new kind of non-violent totalitarianism. All the traditional names, all the hallowed slogans will remain exactly what they were in the good old days. Democracy and freedom will be the theme of every broadcast and editorial--but Democracy and freedom in a strictly Pickwickian sense. Meanwhile the ruling oligarchy and its highly trained elite of soldiers, policemen, thought-manufacturers and mind-manipulators will quietly run the show as they see fit.

    - Aldous Huxley, Brave New World Revisited, published 1958



    This is why (5.00 / 1) (#166)
    by Ga6thDem on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:14:49 PM EST
    I call some of the big box churches Brave New World churches. They operate in a similar way.

    Parent
    You would swear (none / 0) (#173)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:23:25 PM EST
    Some of them studied Huxley and Orwell

    Parent
    Technical Fix (none / 0) (#115)
    by CoralGables on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 09:54:52 AM EST
    It's the last weekend of summer. Sure went by fast.

    The last weekend of Summer will be September 20-21.

    Technicality (not a) Fix (none / 0) (#116)
    by squeaky on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 10:04:29 AM EST
    Michael Sam waived (none / 0) (#165)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:01:24 PM EST
    Michael Sam was waived by the St. Louis Rams on Sunday, but his career as the first openly gay player in the NFL is far from over.


    I sincerely hope his career is far from over (5.00 / 1) (#172)
    by MO Blue on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 03:23:24 PM EST
    That man gives all he's got when on the field and then givers a little more.

    Parent
    Am I the only one who didn't know about this (none / 0) (#181)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 05:19:11 PM EST
    Telluride: Oscar Host To Oscar Contender? Jon Stewart's `Rosewater' Wins Standing Ovation At Festival

    I ran into a producer and Academy voting member after this morning's smash screening of The Daily Show host Jon Stewart's impressive writing and directorial feature debut, Rosewater.  

    Yes, it's a tough film at times to watch as much of it deals with the psychological and political torture of Bahari in Iran at the hands of  his interrogator Rosewater (actor Kim Bodnia, brilliant in a role originally targeted for the late James Gandolfini).

    TRAILER

    No, you weren't the only one... (none / 0) (#197)
    by unitron on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 06:31:59 AM EST
    ...but now thanks to you I know about it as well.

    Parent
    Levon Helm Day (none / 0) (#182)
    by CaptHowdy on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 05:48:30 PM EST
    IS OFFICIAL

    At least here in AR

    I heard they were releasing more ... (5.00 / 1) (#190)
    by magster on Sun Aug 31, 2014 at 09:34:07 PM EST
    Band/Dylan basement tapes.

    And in honor of Levon Helm....

    Parent

    You've already solved the case, Sherlock (none / 0) (#203)
    by Mordiggian 88 on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 01:44:51 PM EST
    Just don't break your arm patting yourself on the back over it.