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Friday Open Thread

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  • SPD gets nod for facial recognition software (5.00 / 1) (#1)
    by shoephone on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:48:46 AM EST
    Gee, thanks to the Seattle City Council, the police will now have use of facial recognition software through a grant from...ta da! Department of Homeland Security. It's supposed to be limited to logging mug shots, but this is as slippery a slope as it gets. Like they're not going to end up using it for surveilling crowds at protest rallies? Right. And the local ACLU has been ridiculously foolish, IMO, to go along with this plan.

    Incidentally, the only council member to vote against the policy was Kshama Sawant, the newly elected socialist. At least one councilmember is looking out for the citizens' interest. But, honestly, Seattle City Council has mostly been useless for years. A more wimpish, compromised bunch of dunderheads you have never met.

    I think the residents should demand (5.00 / 2) (#16)
    by MO Blue on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:53:41 AM EST
    that the city use the program to start a Do you know where your public officials have been this week?

    Using facial recognition to track city councilman, the police, local and state reps. etal. might provide citizens with a lot of useful information on their activities.

    Parent

    Baseball cap sales will soar (5.00 / 1) (#17)
    by jbindc on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:55:35 AM EST
    Also, plastic glasses with fake mustaches.

    Parent
    Large, drooping floppy hats (none / 0) (#43)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:40:48 PM EST
    for the women, worn over extreme Veronica Lake hair.

    Parent
    Hat, sunglasses and a bandana (none / 0) (#92)
    by Lora on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 04:20:16 PM EST
    Maybe there will be an entire new style industry -- how to show yourself in public without being "recognized."  Oh, and don't forget to wrap your smart phone in tinfoil!

    Parent
    LOL! (none / 0) (#96)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 04:50:02 PM EST
    n/t

    Parent
    No recognition = suspicion (none / 0) (#180)
    by Mikado Cat on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 08:41:28 PM EST
    One way I can see the software working is that anybody it fails to recognize gets a security warning score that goes up on the level of recognition failure. Totally obscure your face and expect to be a flashing red star on every security monitor.

    Parent
    That's not a bad idea (none / 0) (#33)
    by shoephone on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:24:36 PM EST
    In Seattle's case, it will just expose them for the chumps we already know them to be.

    Parent
    Facial recognition (none / 0) (#2)
    by Mikado Cat on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:30:13 AM EST
    is going to happen, the ability to create some sort of unique ID that could be matched to any other image of the same person is an irresistible goal that has been long in development and now maturing.

    What it means is that images including faces will be possible to match to reference images at computer speeds instead of manual human speeds.

    This is absolutely going to happen, and it won't be limited to law enforcement, its going to be used for all sorts of photo ID.

    That should not be the focus of concern, what is done with the data, who can access which databases and for what purposes, needs serious thought.

    The days of being an anonymous person walking down the street or driving your car are about to end.

    Parent

    Brave New World (5.00 / 1) (#28)
    by shoephone on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:02:57 PM EST
    so let's just all lie down and take it? Some of uso aren't sheep. And last year the ACLU and the city council successfully beat back a policy for the SPD to start using drones for surveillance, also with a grant from DHS. The difference then was that the citizens got wind of the plan beforehand and mobilized to contact council and make a stink about it in the media. The facial recognition software policy was not publicized at all, so the council didn't have to deal with angry constituents.

    Parent
    Where do the reference photos come from? (none / 0) (#148)
    by EL seattle on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 05:51:40 AM EST
    For the cops, I'd guess theey'd come from mug shots. For Facebook, it would be photos from a user profile page, probably.

    But can a government entity or private company legally take other photos of people without their specific permission and tie tghem to personal data? I think that newspapers and other photographers have to get permission for individuals before they publish stuff like that.

    So maybe there are legal privacy limits as to what can be used for database reference? Not that any of that matters to government spies or energetic tech companies.

    Parent

    Image sources (none / 0) (#175)
    by Mikado Cat on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 08:04:43 PM EST
    Drivers license, ID cards, passports, mug shots, all have pretty clear "right to be taken" and used by the government. If a store puts up a sign saying video security, does entry or standing near the store give them a right to capture and store your image? I think so. Some of my credit cards have my image on them. NSA may have any image taken with a cell phone, or posted to the net.

    Not suggesting we just take it, but to pick the fight with some practical scope. The stink raised about caller ID I think served nobody well.

    I am saying target the fight not at image recognition, but at storage and use of the information.

    Parent

    Maybe it will soon be time (none / 0) (#6)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:23:57 AM EST
    for everyone (men as well as women) to start wearing niqabs in pubic.


    Parent
    Me (5.00 / 1) (#9)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:06:46 AM EST
    I can't wait for the app.  So when someone you are supposed to know comes up and starts chatting away and you have no freakin clue who they are.  Or when you recognize them but can't remember their name.

    Parent
    Damn. I already opined that by my next class (none / 0) (#20)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:11:23 AM EST
    reunion perhaps technology would provide a way to identify the person greeting me. Coulda been a goldmine.

    Parent
    No name tags? (none / 0) (#70)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:58:10 PM EST
    Yes. Laminated. W/high school (5.00 / 1) (#72)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:59:40 PM EST
    yearbook photo. Awkk.

    Parent
    My other invention idea (none / 0) (#94)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 04:25:35 PM EST
    Is HickyForms.  Little plastic forms that let you make hickeys in, like, the shape of your astrology sign or sports team logo. Whadda ya think?

    Parent
    Yeah (none / 0) (#120)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:16:47 PM EST
    I guess you are right

    Parent
    3D printing? (none / 0) (#125)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:39:26 PM EST
    That is the only thing that would make (none / 0) (#69)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:57:20 PM EST
    me use Google Glass

    Parent
    Have you tried google glass (none / 0) (#74)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:03:43 PM EST
    yet?

    Parent
    Lord no! (none / 0) (#102)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 05:53:00 PM EST
    You such an early adapter re (none / 0) (#103)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 05:56:07 PM EST
    Apple....

    Parent
    But I'm not cool enough to get an early (none / 0) (#113)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:30:20 PM EST
    release of google glass!

    Parent
    all you need to do is wear the right stuff (none / 0) (#100)
    by ZtoA on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 05:49:26 PM EST
    and makeup and hairdo. Like this!

    Parent
    Let everyday be Mardi Gras (5.00 / 1) (#18)
    by MO Blue on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:00:12 AM EST
    I think one of these might be more my style.

     

    Parent

    Heh, heh! (none / 0) (#41)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:36:34 PM EST
    I like that.  
    But I was thinking more along the lines of dressing up in a full belly-dancing outfit, complete with veils, every time I go out.  Something like one if these.

    Now, if I were only thirty or forty years younger, maybe I could pull that off...........


    Parent

    If we were a wee big younger and wore one of those (5.00 / 1) (#123)
    by MO Blue on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:19:44 PM EST
    outfits, no one would be looking at our face. ;o)

    P.S. my emoticon represents a wink on a smiley face. Please disregard any other interpretation.

    Parent

    I am trying to picture how that works :-) (none / 0) (#7)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:43:45 AM EST
    start wearing niqabs in pubic

    Thanks for the giggle!

    Parent

    As soon as you step out of your house, (none / 0) (#13)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:28:06 AM EST
    you slip on your face veil.  Simple as that.    ;-)
    Seriously, most Americans are not going to do this, even if facial recognition software becomes widely available and is used to monitor us going about our daily business.
    And even if a large proportion of people do start to wear niqabs in public, I'm wondering if there will be a push in many communities to pass laws banning them.  Of course, then you get into the whole religious intolerance arena, given that, for many Muslim women, wearing a face veil is a religious imperative.


    Parent
    Zorba, you are killing me here. (none / 0) (#19)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:11:10 AM EST
    One more time...

    This is what the fifth grader in me was giggling about!

    niqabs in pubic


    Parent
    It's that d@mned automatic (5.00 / 3) (#39)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:30:31 PM EST
    spelling correct on my iPad.
    I blame Apple.  Why are they obsessed with pubes???
    ;-)

    Parent
    auto-autocorrect.. (none / 0) (#40)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:33:08 PM EST
    must still be in the development stage, with auto-auto-autocorrect still in the early planning stage.

    Parent
    TL (none / 0) (#26)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 11:49:11 AM EST
    Jeralyn wrote about the software a while ago, and included some ideas..

    Parent
    MH370 coverage is nuts (5.00 / 1) (#3)
    by Mikado Cat on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:37:59 AM EST
    The trickle of hard news in this story is crazy, day to day what was known when seems to change. With all the spy stuff it seems weird to me that a 777 wasn't tracked by something.

    Just as weird, at least on Google, its dropping out of being the main story.

    That's a good question (5.00 / 1) (#22)
    by Farmboy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:45:41 AM EST
    Why doesn't the NSA just announced where the plane is?

    Parent
    announce (none / 0) (#23)
    by Farmboy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:46:12 AM EST
    stoopid auto correct

    Parent
    There seems to be a lot of conflicting (none / 0) (#8)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:56:16 AM EST
    theories about what could have happened. I too am surprised that if as they say, the plane changed direction and continued to fly for 4 more hrs, that there is not a single satellite image or confirmation of this.

    My heart goes out to the family members of the passengers. I hope they get some closure soon.

    Parent

    There are satellite images (5.00 / 3) (#29)
    by NYShooter on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:07:33 PM EST
    Yesterday, I saw a program on PBS where a group of former CIA, NSA, and Homeland Security officials were discussing this very issue. They all agreed that, of course, they have the images. The problem is that in order to divulge the information they're afraid that it would also divulge some top secret technology used to capture it. They also said that cooperation between the different spy organizations that have this information is, virtually, nonexistent. Bottom line, coming up with a secure cover story would be too difficult.

    They said it's not the first time that humans were sacrificed to protect our secrets.

    Parent

    Are you saying that (none / 0) (#34)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:33:24 PM EST
    if not for "keeping secrets," the plane and it's occupants would not be (presumably) on the bottom of an ocean?

    Parent
    No, I don't think so (none / 0) (#35)
    by NYShooter on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:53:03 PM EST
    "I'm saying" what they're saying: that, were it not for, "keeping secrets," we might know the location of where the plane was when the sighting occurred.

    And, I'm (just guessing) you knew that.

    Parent

    closely, so I applogize if I am lagging behind, but is this the location of the "sighting" you are referring to?
    On Wednesday, in a new twist to the mystery, officials suggested the plane may have been detected on military radar at 2.15am on Saturday, 200 miles north-west of Penang - a point which is not only west of the Malay peninsula, but so far north that it would be beyond the coast of Thailand. It was the third possible final time and location officials have given.

    "We are not saying this is MH370. It's an unidentified plot," said air force chief Rodzali Daud at a press conference in Kuala Lumpur.



    Parent
    Not exactly, (none / 0) (#55)
    by NYShooter on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:29:55 PM EST
    I was just referring to a group of former intelligence experts discussing the general problem of classified information, who gathers it, how its gathered, and, the lack of cooperation among them. Basically, to the question of, "does anyone know any more about the plane's direction/location than what has been reported?" The answer, they claim, is "yes."

    However, there is a report out today in the NYT, about a private satellite company that may have some important information:
    ------------------------------------

     "As the hunt for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet expanded into the vastness of the Indian Ocean, a satellite communications company confirmed on Friday that it had recorded electronic "keep alive" ping signals from the plane after it disappeared, and said those signals could be analyzed to help estimate its location."

    "The information from the company, Inmarsat, could prove to be the first big break in helping narrow the frustrating search for the plane with 239 people aboard that mysteriously disappeared from radar screens a week ago,"

    LINK

    Parent

    humans being sacrificed to protect our secrets, I thought you were implying that if not for our secrets this plane's occupants would still be alive.

    I misunderstood you.

    Here is the Inmarsat press release, let's hope their info does help:

    Inmarsat statement on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370

    14 March 2014: Inmarsat has issued the following statement regarding Malaysia Airlines flight MH370.

    Routine, automated signals were registered on the Inmarsat network from Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 during its flight from Kuala Lumpur.

    This information was provided to our partner SITA, which in turn has shared it with Malaysia Airlines.

    For further information, please contact Malaysia Airlines.



    Parent
    I don't know how much fuel it had. (none / 0) (#63)
    by Donald from Hawaii on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:46:37 PM EST
    But Delta Air Lines uses a B-777 on its Atlanta-Johannesburg run, which at nearly 8,500 miles -- and between 15.5 to 17 hours flying time, depending upon the weather and time of year -- is the longest nonstop commercial air route in the world. Needless to say, that type of aircraft possesses a considerable range.

    (Next time you're at a major airport and you get a chance to see a B-777 and / or a B-787, check out the size of that plane's engines in comparison with those found on other Boeing commercial aircraft, including the B-747. That is some major horsepower!)

    Aloha.

    Parent

    I just have (none / 0) (#24)
    by sj on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 11:32:25 AM EST
    to uprate your comment on this because I so rarely have the opportunity. :)

    I agree. This is so hard for the families.

    Parent

    A lawsuit (5.00 / 2) (#4)
    by lentinel on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:24:49 AM EST
    alleging sexual harassment at a NYC firm was described in today's NY Daily News:

    Christina Young, 36, says in her Manhattan Supreme Court suit that her colleagues at the executive compensation consulting firm Steven Hall & Partners routinely talked about erections, oral sex and masturbation in front of her.

    The hostile work environment was so pervasive and severe that some employees placed wagers on how long it would take to adequately offend [Young] before she would be forced to leave the room," her filing says.

    Link

    Not to be outdone, the authors of the article describe Ms. Young as a "brainy blonde beauty".

    Leaves me speechless.

    The sad thing is it's not unusual (5.00 / 2) (#31)
    by shoephone on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:16:57 PM EST
    Ms. Young's suit is important for so many reasons, not the least of which is that, contrary to what many people would like to believe, women get harassed at their law firms all the time. A friend of mine got harassed by her boss at a law firm and the stress of having to go to work there every day nearly put her in the hospital. Thank God she got out. I and another friend urged her to sue, but she said she'd be blackballed from ever working in another Seattle law firm if she did.

    I haven't had to deal with quite that much disgustingness all at once, but I did work in a place where one of the other employees and one of the longtime clients both sexually harassed me with impunity for months. When I complained to the boss/owner about it, he snickered and said I should just relax, that it was "all in fun." This being the early 80's, and me being 23 years old, I didn't think I had the option of suing anyone. Getting out of there and finding another job was the only option.

    Parent

    I was actually surprised to read this. (none / 0) (#36)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:59:53 PM EST
    In this day and age, I assumed companies and their HR departments, especially in NYC and other metro areas have made it very clear to their employees that sexual harassment in any shape or form will not be tolerated.

    Parent
    Depends on the company/parent company (5.00 / 2) (#38)
    by nycstray on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:22:04 PM EST
    When I worked places that were part of a larger corp, it was more clear. Smaller/Indie companies varied and depended on the mentality at the top.

    Out here, whenever I see open positions at tech companies, I tend to look at their staff photos, if possible, to see the gender ratio. Last thing I want to do is work with a bunch of "brogrammers" . . .

    Parent

    Exactly, and still very much a power dynamic (5.00 / 2) (#110)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:16:23 PM EST
    Women are still  not in the authority positions in large numbers and are more likely to be taken advantage of in that way.

    Parent
    On cue, I am watching tivo'd Daily Show with (5.00 / 2) (#115)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:35:38 PM EST
    Anita Hill. In a clip from a new documentary about her, she says harassment is all about power and control.

    Parent
    I have been out of the work force for (5.00 / 2) (#118)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:10:19 PM EST
    a few years now, so my perception is based on and I guess skewed by what I hear from my husband and friends, since they work for large companies.
    I just assumed sexual harassment would be more prevalent in mom and pop type companies and in less liberal areas of the country.

    I still can't believe these guys thought they would get away with it. They are lawyers, for f*cks sake! Plus, it is not like she was a powerless intern. She is a very accomplished woman. I hope she cleans them out!

    Parent

    It goes from blatant to subtle (5.00 / 1) (#137)
    by nycstray on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:05:13 PM EST
    but it most certainly has not come close to declining. IME, large companies (I won't name names :)) were more subtle just because of the 'rules', aka the boys (who needed restraint) generally tried to play within the boundaries . . ahem . . . like that's fun for us. . . And then there was working in the garment district, o.m.g. needed lots of showers for that.

    There's a reason we're still fighting the fight, and it's not just the GOP "War on Women'. Look at what the current generation of new bright minds in the work place (and the ones to be joining soon) haves dealt educated women. 1 in 5 have/will experience(d) sexual assault in college. And if you go the military route . . .

    Parent

    Depends on the HR dept (none / 0) (#44)
    by shoephone on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:45:07 PM EST
    One of my family members is an HR director and has dealt with sexual harassment claims a few times, and in every case, the perp was guilty and got nailed for it. However...this HR director is a woman--who has been harassed by one of those bosses herself--and that kind of thing makes a lot of difference in the outcome of the employee's complaint! In one case, the owner of the company (a major PR company) was the harasser. After months of denials, back and forth claims, it became clear to my relative and the company vice-president that the man was guilty...other employees had started coming forward with similar claims against him...he was "eased out" of his presidency and chairmanship (he was booted out on his a$$) with a great severance package and no lawsuit.

    This stuff still happens, sometimes at the very highest levels.

    Parent

    Holy Smokes (none / 0) (#25)
    by sj on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 11:37:58 AM EST
    And reading most of those comments is pretty stomach-turning also.

    Parent
    So proud of my home state (5.00 / 1) (#5)
    by jbindc on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:08:11 AM EST
    Not.

    Abortion insurance law taking effect in Michigan

    Michigan residents who buy health coverage in the private marketplace after Thursday will not have access to abortion coverage, even if a pregnancy is the result of rape or incest.

    On that day, a new state law goes into effect that prohibits insurance companies from covering abortion services unless customers purchase separate add-ons -- called riders -- to their insurance plans ahead of time.

    No insurance companies will be offering those riders to new customers in the private marketplace after Thursday, according to the state's Department of Insurance and Financial Services.

    Insurers had to tell the state in February if they planned to offer and sell the abortion riders. Seven companies indicated they plan to do so but only as part of employer-based plans, department spokesman Caleb Buhs said.

    That means anyone who purchases insurance as an individual -- either inside or outside the new federal health-care exchange -- will not be able to obtain coverage for abortion services



    Makes sense. Afterall, why make life easier (5.00 / 2) (#12)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:26:52 AM EST
    for a woman when she is most vulnerable?
    I wonder if the people who came up with this bill are aware of how much it costs, especially in the 2nd trimester when you really need general anesthetic. The 2nd trimester ultrasound/screening is when many women (particularly those under 35) find out if something is wrong.

    Parent
    They do not care how much it costs. Their (5.00 / 4) (#14)
    by caseyOR on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:38:58 AM EST
    only goal to make it impossible for any woman to get an abortion for any reason. I would wager that the more expensive, and so out of reach for many, an abortion becomes the happier these people will be.

    Parent
    I don't understand this at all. (5.00 / 7) (#15)
    by Anne on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:48:32 AM EST
    Seriously - it makes no sense to me.  

    I started - about 6 times - to say more than that, but I keep coming back to the same place: it's insane.  Not to mention cruel, discriminatory, and not likely to save anyone any money.

     

    Parent

    Question (5.00 / 2) (#10)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:08:57 AM EST
    With all our technology why can't we make an ear plug that will stay in the ears of talk show guests?

    AN AXE LENGTH AWAY, vol. 302 (5.00 / 1) (#21)
    by Dadler on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:41:38 AM EST
    Sometimes those little crispy bits are just as good as anti-depressants. (link)

    v. 301
    v. 300
    v. 299

    Only 63 more comics until I reach my goal 365 in less than a year.

    Peace out and TGIF, my friends.

    I Get It (1.00 / 1) (#48)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:56:59 PM EST
    He was a big contributed to Obama..  and suggested McCain would have to get a lobotomy to get his endorsement as his views on social issues were so far from his own.

    Buffett bad because he supported obama.

    Following The Money? (1.00 / 1) (#57)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:36:20 PM EST
    People who are addicted to money and power don't generally care where it comes from

    OK so you believe that Buffet is immoral? would get involved in human trafficking were it profitable?

    Pretty broad brush you are using. But I guess that people "addicted"
    to the kind of work you do are moral, healthy and wonderful.

    And do you know something about Buffett's money or investments that we don't?

    You implied that if you followed the money that Buffett invests or has accumulated would lead to finding out that he is a dangerous man.

    Care to back them up with fact?

    Or just gratuitously bashing the rich for sport.

    Human trafficking is a stretch (none / 0) (#132)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:49:19 PM EST
    even rhetorically.

    Parent
    Yes (none / 0) (#154)
    by squeaky on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 10:13:13 AM EST
    And it is also a stretch, even rhetorically, to suggest that Buffett is an addict who does not care where his money comes from.

    FWIW:

    Human trafficking represents an estimated $32 billion of international trade per annum....

    Parent

    Anyone (none / 0) (#11)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:14:47 AM EST
    Watching Red Road on Sundance?

    No, I will have to look into it (none / 0) (#73)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:00:23 PM EST
    I have a void to fill until Mad Men.

    Parent
    Another (5.00 / 1) (#140)
    by Ga6thDem on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:32:08 PM EST
    Mad Men fan!! Yay!!!

    Parent
    Me too now (5.00 / 1) (#143)
    by Militarytracy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:36:48 PM EST
    Binge watching Netflix creates new addictions :)

    Parent
    You wrer a Dexter fan, yes (none / 0) (#89)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:55:43 PM EST
    Curious how you felt about the last season.  Curious if others hated it as much as I did.

    I also think Banshee is outstanding and I am very interested in the new HBO series with Clive Owen.  Knick I think it's called.

    Parent

    The Knick (none / 0) (#90)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 04:04:50 PM EST
    Is also Steven Soderbergh.  Oh, and as for red road Jason Momoa is beyond hot.

    Parent
    It is going to be on Cinemax (none / 0) (#114)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:32:12 PM EST
    Maybe starting in August, but has not been announced yet. About a hospital in early 20th century.

    Parent
    Oh man, I adore Clive Owen. Will check that out! (none / 0) (#104)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 05:58:13 PM EST
    Dexter, yeah, the last season was hard to take. I just could not handle what happened to Deb. I guess spoilers are ok at this late date., but SPOILER ALERT! I would have been satisfied if Dexter died and Deb went off to Alaska to get over it all. I did like the story line with the psychiatrist,her son, and all the  family issues it brought  up. I guess all in all I liked it fine until the final 2 episodes.

    Parent
    Daniel Day Lewis, Clive Owen and (5.00 / 1) (#105)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:06:03 PM EST
    Stephen Colbert. Dammit Ruffian, you are lusting after all my men!

    Parent
    Hee hee hee, yeah, that is pretty much my trifecta (5.00 / 1) (#111)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:18:22 PM EST
    Did someone say "Daniel Day Lewis"?! :) (5.00 / 1) (#131)
    by nycstray on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:48:55 PM EST
    They are all (none / 0) (#145)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 09:15:39 PM EST
    lust-worthy, indeed.
    I would add Ralph Fiennes.  And Liam Neeson.
    Oh, and, by the way, Peter Dinklage.  

    Parent
    Charlotte Rampling (none / 0) (#119)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:14:21 PM EST
    Is one of my favorite actors ever.  Night Porter is one of my all time favorite films so that part I liked.  I did not like Deb dying but as far as the ending it seemed like they had a meeting and someone said "ok, since the first episode every fan has been trying to imagine what ultimately happens to Dexter.  We have to come up with an ending NOONE will see coming."  And they succeeded.  I would bet not one person on earth thought Dexter would run away and become a lumberjack. I am still pissed.  It felt like a total betrayal of the fans.  Contrast to the end of Breaking Bad.  One of the all time best endings ever.

    Parent
    Speaking of finales (none / 0) (#122)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:19:09 PM EST
    The season finale of Banshee is tonight at 9.

    On Demand is a wonderful thing.

    Parent

    Oh my gawd. It's a good thing I (none / 0) (#126)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:42:10 PM EST
    never watched "Dexter."

    Parent
    There must be some kind of (none / 0) (#133)
    by CaptHowdy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:52:15 PM EST
    Statute of limitations on spoilers.  
    Btw Norman Bates mom is stuffed ;)

    Parent
    So was Misty of Chincoteague. . (none / 0) (#136)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:00:33 PM EST
    You just broke my inner child (none / 0) (#141)
    by Militarytracy on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:33:24 PM EST
    Detroit's new mayor (none / 0) (#27)
    by jbindc on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 11:58:01 AM EST
    Warren Buffet -- sage or consumate insider? (none / 0) (#30)
    by Dadler on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:16:49 PM EST
    People who are addicted to money and power (5.00 / 2) (#32)
    by shoephone on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 12:23:00 PM EST
    don't generally care where it comes from. Buffet has successfully created the image of himself as the kindly grandpa, investing deliberately and moderately, therefore, he's no danger to anyone...Following the money, as always, tells us what we need to know about people.

    Parent
    Bsahing Buffett? (3.00 / 2) (#42)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:38:53 PM EST
    With Innuendo? What do you have on him shoephone? From what I have read his political positions are better than many here. And he puts his money where his mouth is..  

    To suggest he is a danger is really slimy imo. And this:

     

    Buffet has successfully created the image of himself as the kindly grandpa, investing deliberately and moderately...

    WTF? Do you think that he has some evil plan to take over the world and has carefully created a false image of himself to provide stealth?

    Parent

    Jefferson once said... (5.00 / 2) (#45)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:47:45 PM EST
    he believed banking institutions were a greater threat to liberty than standing armies.  And Buffet is a walking bank.

    And I believe it was Balzac who coined the phrase "behind every great fortune there is a great crime".

    I don't think he has plans for world domination, but he's well on his way to US wealth-domination.  And though he's always saying "tax me more", he hasn't donated anything extra to the treasury yet afaik.

    Parent

    Philanthropy (5.00 / 2) (#50)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:05:28 PM EST
    He gives his money to charity, and holds views that may be similar to yours regarding the way money is distributed in our system:

    My luck was accentuated by my living in a market system that sometimes produces distorted results, though overall it serves our country well... I've worked in an economy that rewards someone who saves the lives of others on a battlefield with a medal, rewards a great teacher with thank-you notes from parents, but rewards those who can detect the mispricing of securities with sums reaching into the billions. In short, fate's distribution of long straws is wildly capricious.



    Parent
    I hear ya bro... (5.00 / 1) (#53)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:24:01 PM EST
    he's certainly not the worst billionaire in the world...but he's still a billionaire.  Obscenity.

    But he's not delusional like so many of the rest of the billionaire set, I'll give him that.  But that begs the question...why is he in the rackets at all if that's how he feels?  

    I might feel better if he was delusional like his colleagues...he knows it's f*cked up and plays right along, shooting the angles hustling.

    Parent

    Totally off the current topic, (5.00 / 1) (#56)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:35:13 PM EST
    but I found an appropriate popcorn popper as per your specifications for roasting coffee beans, at a Salvation Army thrift shop, of all places.
    As soon as the weather turns warmer and I can open the windows and run some fans for ventilation, I want to order the green coffee beans and start roasting.
    Of course, it may be awhile up here before the weather gets warm.  We are expecting more snow on Monday.  :-(
    (Looks like we will not be planting potatoes at the traditional time, which is St. Patrick's Day.  Usually we don't hit the day exactly, but within a week or so.  Who knows, this year?)

    Parent
    Link (none / 0) (#60)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:42:43 PM EST
    In case you did not see it, I posted this link in the coffee thread, as a good instruction guide. I like dark roasts, and am currently (no pun intended) playing around with using very long extension cords to slow down the process.

    From what I gathered, you prefer a lighter roast, so it may work out for you to remove the beans just after the second crack... 4.5-6 minutes, depending on your machine and variables.

    Or remove the beans shortly after the first crack..  I found that there is usually 1-1.5 minutes between the first crack and second.

    Keep notes!

    Parent

    Thanks, I saved the link (none / 0) (#65)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:50:14 PM EST
    I don't like really light roasts, but I don't want really dark unless I want to drink espresso.  I guess I would say that we prefer a slightly more than medium-body roast.
    Looks like I will be doing some experimenting in a few weeks.  I will definitely keep notes.  This will amuse Mr. Zorba, since he is a scientist and keeps notes on lab experiments all the time.
    I will consider this in the nature of a culinary experiment.  Since Mr. Zorba also loves his coffee, I expect that he will get involved in this at some point, as well.    ;-)

    Parent
    Onto something else.. (5.00 / 1) (#150)
    by jondee on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 09:18:50 AM EST
    Zorba,  I finally got around to seeing Inside Llewyn Davis the other night. It's striking to me how few people see that film as being about an artist finding himself and his voice..You see and hear Llewyn's voice and spirit finally breaking through in that slowly-building-in-intensity, firey version of Fair Thee Well near the end of the film. That moment almost made me cry. I think possibly people like this film to the degree that they have affection for the real Llewyn Davis' in life, of which I've known at least at least a couple in my time. As a matter of fact, ten minutes into the film I found myself thinking out loud "My God, that's Steve to a tee!" Artists are always "difficult people"; they're always searching, always in ferment. The understanding
    of that state of affairs is exemplified beautifully by Llewyn's sweet professor friend and his wife in the film.

    Also, what amazing, haunting cinematography there is in this film. And as icing on the cake, a brief marvelous scene shot on the street from the Dylan Freewheelin' album cover.

    Parent

    I watched Inside Llewyn Davis last night (none / 0) (#151)
    by CoralGables on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 09:41:55 AM EST
    and although unimpressed, would still place it above Her, Nebraska, and Gravity, but below American Hustle, 12 Years a Slave, Captain Phillips, Dallas Buyer's Club and The Wolf of Wall Street. (still haven't seen Philomena)

    Would also place it behind August: Osage County.

    Parent

    This things are obviously (5.00 / 1) (#152)
    by jondee on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 09:49:37 AM EST
    tremendously subjective..

    I watched Rush, which I'd heard nice things about, after Llewyn Davis and it was like viewing the works of Leroy Neiman after walking through a Rembrandt exhibit.

    Parent

    Just saw Philomena yesterday (5.00 / 2) (#153)
    by MO Blue on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 09:58:55 AM EST
    Very sad. The pain that people inflict on others in the name doing the will of God just never ceases to astound me no matter how often it is done.  

    Parent
    Yje book on which the film is based is available (none / 0) (#166)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 03:17:17 PM EST
    via amazon. I have bought the kindle version. Have not read it yet n

    Parent
    I am on the waiting list at the library (none / 0) (#202)
    by MO Blue on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 01:28:00 PM EST
    Let me know if you liked it after you complete it. IIRC I am number 128 on the list so you will probably be finished long before I get the book.

    The title is The Lost Child of Philomena Lee for anyone else who may be interested.

    Parent

    I have to finish Elizabeth George and read (none / 0) (#204)
    by oculus on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:21:20 PM EST
    Armistead Maupin first!

    Parent
    I'd place nothing behind "Osage County." (none / 0) (#164)
    by Donald from Hawaii on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 02:05:03 PM EST
    That was, in my opinion, a truly contemptible film. On stage, it's a great black comedy. On screen, it's just black, and Meryl Streep was channeling Al Pacino at his most excessive, with her ghastly scenery-chewing performance.

    On stage, Estelle Parsons found real pathos and humor in Vi's outragious behavior. Streep played Vi onscreen like she had just binge-watched the complete works of Tennessee Williams and Eugene O'Neill, and nailed her character's pathetic repulsiveness while forgoing her humanity.

    Aloha.

    Parent

    Agreed. (none / 0) (#199)
    by KeysDan on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 12:55:40 PM EST
    Not only the Broadway stage, but also, a community playhouse of amateurs in my little island city, captured the ethos and pathos of Vi.  While the vigor of the 86-year old Miss Parsons running up and down the stairs, alone, was unlikely to be reproduced in the movie, Miss Streep, my view, missed the essence of  Steppenwolf's art.

    Parent
    Yes, she did. By a mile. (none / 0) (#214)
    by Donald from Hawaii on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:59:49 PM EST
    But that said, La Streep's misfires are still way more interesting than most of the schlock that's presently out there on any given day. I noticed that they made a sequel to "300" -- just what we need, "Folsom Street Fair, B.C."

    Parent
    I know I am in the minority, (5.00 / 1) (#217)
    by KeysDan on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 03:25:00 PM EST
    if not the "lone ranger,"   but  I feel Miss Streep often over-acts and is over-rated.    

    Parent
    kdog, you are so underemployed (5.00 / 2) (#54)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:27:40 PM EST
    in light of your literary acumen.

    Parent
    Knowledge is it's own reward... (5.00 / 5) (#61)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:42:56 PM EST
    my dear...besides, wisdom and imagination are really where it's at.

    Knowledge can be obtained with a library card...wisdom and imagination are much rarer commodities.

    Parent

    fwiw, according to snopes: (none / 0) (#64)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:49:49 PM EST
    Although Jefferson certainly expressed disdain and mistrust of banking institutions and paper currency on many occasions, this particular quotation bears all the hallmarks of being a retroquote -- "words placed posthumously in the mouth of a well-known dead person":

        No documentation ties it to its putative originator.

        Its earliest known reference did not appear until long after the death of its supposed originator.

        Multiple sources are claimed for its origins.

        Contextual information indicates the words are of more recent origin than claimed



    Parent
    I (possibly) stand corrected... (none / 0) (#71)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:59:01 PM EST
    Will the 1937 Congressional aide please stand up and receive thy Jeffersonian Spirit Award? ;)

    Parent
    Well, you made me investigate Balzac also (none / 0) (#76)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:05:34 PM EST
    Balzac published a series of interlinked novels called "La Comédie Humaine" or "The Human Comedy", and "Le Père Goriot" was part of this series. Eventually all were translated into English, and here is a rendering of the statement above published in 1896:
    The secret of a great success for which you are at a loss to account is a crime that has never been found out, because it was properly executed.

    Here is another translation into English that was published in 1900:

    The secret of a great fortune made without apparent cause is soon forgotten, if the crime is committed in a respectable way.

    Note that Honoré de Balzac did not pronounce a general rule that larceny was at the root of all large fortunes.

    However, the simplified statement that is popular in modern times is arguably more provocative and consequently more memorable.



    Parent
    You are a stickler... (5.00 / 2) (#79)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:15:27 PM EST
    speaking of missed callings, you should work for Snopes! ;)

    Interesting tidbits from wiki on Balzac...he once studied law but turned his back on the profession due to its "inhumanity" and "banality".  Yet his politics were conservative royalist.  Interesting cat.

    Parent

    Ha! I tool a biz law class once (none / 0) (#84)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:31:16 PM EST
    and it was banal beyond words. Now, though, I find many aspects of the law very interesting.

    Parent
    So many acclaimed composers (5.00 / 2) (#87)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:45:19 PM EST
    studied law resentfully and then followed their true callings. I reversed this path.

    Parent
    There's still time to go back.. (none / 0) (#144)
    by jondee on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:39:03 PM EST
    Kind of have gone back. (none / 0) (#157)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 12:05:02 PM EST
    Playing piano again after a 20-yr. hiatus.

    Parent
    Did you see that Kos of Dailykos plays too (none / 0) (#158)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 01:08:42 PM EST
    And used to write his own stuff as well?

    Parent
    Ugh! I took a Business Law class in (none / 0) (#108)
    by vml68 on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:13:11 PM EST
    college and expected to really like it and find it fascinating, but instead it was absolute torture. As soon as the professor started speaking, I would zone out.
    I like to read just about anything, but I found going through that textbook excruciating.


    Parent
    Stand your ground. (none / 0) (#127)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:45:42 PM EST
    You're telling me (none / 0) (#142)
    by jondee on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:35:23 PM EST
    Not to the Treasury, (none / 0) (#49)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:03:41 PM EST
    But:

    In 2006, Buffett pledged most of his fortune to the Gates Foundation and to four charitable trusts created by his family--the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation, the Howard G. Buffett Foundation, the Susan A. Buffett Foundation, and the NoVo Foundation (led by Peter A. Buffett). His gift to the Gates Foundation of 10 million shares of Berkshire Hathaway stock, to be paid in annual installments, was worth approximately $31 billion in June 2006.

    Gates Foundation

    Maybe he thinks that the various foundations will make better use of his money than the US Treasury.

    Parent

    The Foundation... (none / 0) (#52)
    by kdog on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:14:29 PM EST
    most definitely would make better use of it than the US Treasury, which funds the NSA, DEA, CIA, DHS, and assorted acronyms for tyranny.

    Kudos due for the 31 billion with a b, no doubt...but I like to think if it were me, I'd at least give away 57 and a half of the 58 billion I was worth, retire from the finance rackets leaving my life of crime behind, and go party my arse off for a lifetime on the 500 million of grift money left over;)

    Parent

    He may be somewhat on the same page you are, (none / 0) (#95)
    by Zorba on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 04:44:16 PM EST
    Dog. Uncle Warren has pledged to give away 99% of his net worth.  He is worth, more or less, $60 billion.  One percent of that would leave around $600 million.  Pretty close to your $500 million.
    Of course, he's getting older.  He's already given away a lot of that, but not all of it.  The rest may be given away after he dies, depending upon how soon he leaves this earth.  
    Which doesn't leave his kids anywhere near what they could have gotten if he hadn't given away most of it.  But still, I'm sure that we would all be happy with whatever the kids wind up inheriting.   ;-)


    Parent
    Isn't (none / 0) (#116)
    by Mikado Cat on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:43:37 PM EST
    pretty much all of those billions hard at work providing people jobs right now? Its not like Scrooge McDuck with a giant vault of gold, its shares of company stock which allow good companies to grow.

    Parent
    Your Source? (none / 0) (#47)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 01:52:26 PM EST
    Not sure your source is doing anything but trying to drum up business. Is this a site whose information you trust?

    Swing Traders & Investors, position your portfolio for profit with our Research Center. Step inside this Elite service for 7 free days right now and view the latest trades. If you have been living under a rock and have not heard about our performance over the past +6 years, take a look at the documented Track Record of every call members received for 2013 right here. See you all on the right side of the trade!
     

    Seems to me that they are painting Buffett as having insider knowledge, which corresponds to their stock recommendations... for a small fee you can sign up and be as rich as Buffett... without going to jail.

    (Buffett going to jail???, hahaha)

    If someone would simply do the math on how many subscribers they have, its easy to see that their cash flow is from marketing their website, not from trading. The free videos market for the Research Center. The Research Center videos market for the ChatRoom, the ChatRoom markets for the overpriced WEBINARS. It's a great little scheme they have running. But they are better at this scheme than they are at trading the market.

    link

    Parent

    Today's open thread was pretty boring. But (5.00 / 1) (#58)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:36:21 PM EST
    then,...

    Parent
    hahahahaha (5.00 / 1) (#62)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:44:03 PM EST
    We don't like boring..  

    Parent
    Since this an open thread, (5.00 / 1) (#68)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 02:56:44 PM EST
    No segue, today a friend told me he just bought a new Yamaha "5 x 5" piano with a walnut case. He was a bass trombone major at Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music but switched to a non-music field. Many years ago. Has played piano and taken lessons for exactly five months!  I am very envious.

    Parent
    What is That? (none / 0) (#77)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:09:20 PM EST
    yamaha 5 x 5 walnut piano?  sounds like a waste of good wood..

    Parent
    Must be this one, which (none / 0) (#82)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:25:42 PM EST
    mercifully is not available in "polished white."  link

    (I do not lust for a Yamaha.)

    Parent

    Oh (none / 0) (#97)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 05:13:06 PM EST
    Looks like it will sound bright and tinny.

    IMO a  good electric, with full weighted keyboard, would be better.


    Parent

    My friend started on a Yamaha electric. Then his (none / 0) (#134)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:54:08 PM EST
    teacher of 5 months said, it is time for you to buy a piano. And helped him select one. And the salesman said, you are the finest pianist to ever play at our piano store. Baksheesh????

    Parent
    That sounds like what a friend of mine (5.00 / 1) (#78)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:10:33 PM EST
    who was once (still is?) very into multi-level marketing of various products says about the way it has evolved. It is not about the products at all - it is about selling the training "secrets" to people to supposedly sell the products. Eventually the smarter ones catch on and realize they are not going to get rich selling the acai juice or metabolife, or whatever - but they can make money convincing others they can sell the stuff. A real Aha! moment for me hearing all this.

    Parent
    Yup! (none / 0) (#83)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 03:26:44 PM EST
    Sounds about the same.  From what I read, in comments about that site, no one who subscribed to their stock tips etc ever made any money..  but they cash in by collecting $$ to join and get the training videos etc..


    Parent
    Sometimes I think people who get (5.00 / 1) (#106)
    by ruffian on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:09:11 PM EST
    Into that kind of stuff get their money's worth out of the excitement and hope they get from getting involved for a while, even if they never profit. It is almost like their form of entertainment, as long as they keep their day job too. My friend was a tad bipolar I think.

    Parent
    Yes (none / 0) (#107)
    by squeaky on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:12:48 PM EST
    Good point. better to think of it a service industry catering to a type of entertainment. End is not the point but the means is where the juice is. Win win..  

    Parent
    It can be a very burdensome debt. (none / 0) (#129)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:47:22 PM EST
    Well (none / 0) (#155)
    by jondee on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 10:33:08 AM EST
    we had all better hope and pray Buffet is somewhat enlightened now that even the ACLU has basically declared that money is speech.

    Parent
    Are the knife attacks (none / 0) (#117)
    by Mikado Cat on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 06:53:36 PM EST
    in the news taking some of the steam out of the anti gun movement?

    Doubt it (none / 0) (#135)
    by Yman on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:58:25 PM EST
    It has nothing to do with numbers (none / 0) (#176)
    by Mikado Cat on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 08:10:56 PM EST
    its about media coverage, which will inevitably lead to numbers.

    Parent
    The media coverage will ... (none / 0) (#177)
    by Yman on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 08:17:03 PM EST
    ... lead to numbers?  What does that mean?

    Parent
    If media starts showing (none / 0) (#181)
    by Mikado Cat on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:54:45 AM EST
    the bias toward coverage of any knife related event, those who wish to have their actions get the most media coverage will use the weapon with the most media response.

    If knives start to capture more media attention, there will likely be some shift, and that make take some of the gleam out of media eyes for reporting anything negative gun related.

    In an area where its actually hard to buy an illegal gun, knives and bombs become the first choice.

    Parent

    It's not "bias" (none / 0) (#184)
    by Yman on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 07:35:57 AM EST
    Media tend to focus on gun violence over knife violence because of the higher magnitude of the risk, the much higher prevalence of knife violence and the fact that guns are the choice of weapon for high (and low) profile crimes.

    In an area where its actually hard to buy an illegal gun, knives and bombs become the first choice.

    Really?  Considering the fact that gun violence far outnumber knife violence across the US and I can count the number of bomb attacks on my fingers, I'm assuming you're talking about England?  Strange, considering the chances of being a victim of knife crime are only slightly higher than in the United States.  There were 32,714 knife offenses in the UK in 2011 (page 18, paragraph 1), for a ratio of 52.6 offences per 100,000 people.  In the US, this number was 45.8.  Thus, you were 1.14 times more likely to be the victim of knife crime in the UK compared to the US.

    With respect to gun crime, OTOH,  firearms were used in 67.7 percent of our nation's murders, a ratio of 3.17 per 100,000 people.  In the UK, the number was 55 gun murders (page 63, paragraph 3), or a ratio of 0.08 per 100,000.  So in the US you are 39.6 times more likely to be the victim of gun murder than in the UK.

    I would take that trade any day of the week and 39.6 times on Sunday.

    Parent

    Should read ... (none / 0) (#185)
    by Yman on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 07:36:45 AM EST
    ... "the much higher prevalence of gun violence ...".

    Parent
    I hear the flights (none / 0) (#187)
    by Mikado Cat on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:45:00 AM EST
    are regularly scheduled, write when you get settled. Giving up freedom for the perception of safety never appealed much to me.

    Knives make better weapons for terror, as long as none of the victims have a gun.

    Parent

    I would trade it HERE (none / 0) (#191)
    by Yman on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 09:39:23 AM EST
    But nice deflection/ignoring of the actual facts which debunk your NRA myths.

    Parent
    Knives (none / 0) (#193)
    by jbindc on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 09:43:03 AM EST
    are also better for doing things like cutting my steak up or buttering my toast.

    Guns, on the other hand, have no other uses.

    Parent

    thread cleaned (none / 0) (#121)
    by Jeralyn on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:17:47 PM EST
    of personal attacks and name calling. Shoshone, please stop or you will go to time out.

    Ezra Kelin stepped into (none / 0) (#128)
    by KeysDan on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:45:53 PM EST
    a controversy with the hiring of Brandon Ambrosino, a gay man who is a gay contrarian, for his new media venture, VOX.  Mr. Ambrosino is a graduate of Liberty University and is a fan of the late Jerry Falwell (of gays are responsible for 9/ll fame among volumes of similar utterances).   Klein is defending his new hire on the basis that he did not read all of Ambrosino's work.  I note from the guide that Andrew Sullivan is scheduled to be a guest on tonight's Bill Maher show.  My guess is that Ambrosino will have Sulllivan in his corner--to be continued.

    Ezra Klein (none / 0) (#130)
    by KeysDan on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 07:47:54 PM EST
    Unsolicited advice: (none / 0) (#138)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:09:33 PM EST
    ignore your tormentor(s).

    I still say oreos and ice tea (5.00 / 1) (#146)
    by CoralGables on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 10:30:05 PM EST
    cures all blog related stress

    Parent
    "The Psychology of Online (5.00 / 1) (#147)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 01:56:43 AM EST
    Comments":

    New Yorker

    Parent

    Good article! (none / 0) (#149)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 07:30:11 AM EST
    Not sure that group moderation comcept applies (none / 0) (#156)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 11:54:01 AM EST
    here though.

    Parent
    Group moderation can fail :) (none / 0) (#159)
    by Militarytracy on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 01:09:23 PM EST
    The comment to which we are replying has (none / 0) (#167)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 03:22:49 PM EST
    vanished.

    Parent
    NRA opposes Pres. Obama's Surgeon General (none / 0) (#139)
    by oculus on Fri Mar 14, 2014 at 08:31:49 PM EST
    nominee.  Some Dem. senators will not vote for the nominee.

    NYT

    Makes me want to donate to the NRA (none / 0) (#178)
    by Mikado Cat on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 08:25:11 PM EST
    nobody else seems as willing to protect the second amendment as they are. What is Obama thinking trying to slip a radical anti gun person in as Surgeon General?

    Parent
    In my opinion, this is not "radical": (5.00 / 1) (#179)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 08:30:37 PM EST
    Though Dr. Murthy has expressed a desire to see more restrictions on how guns can be purchased and who can own them -- views in step with where many Americans stand on gun control -- the N.R.A. has dismissed him as a radical.


    Parent
    Maybe not Obama radical, but (none / 0) (#182)
    by Mikado Cat on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 03:05:52 AM EST
    Murthy tweeted this, "Tired of politicians playing politics w/ guns, putting lives at risk b/c they're scared of NRA. Guns are a health care issue."

    Former Surgeon General Richard Carmona wrote a letter to the president in December to protest nominating Dr. Murthy because he is not qualified. Dr. Carmona said that Dr. Murthy appeared to have "no significant related leadership experience and no formal public health training or experience."

    Doctors for America was Doctors for Obama in 2008, why should we be OK with Obama paying his political debts with critical government jobs? Being a campaign supporter should not be the primary qualification.

    Parent

    Not radical at all (5.00 / 1) (#186)
    by Yman on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:09:02 AM EST
    Murthy tweeted this, "Tired of politicians playing politics w/ guns, putting lives at risk b/c they're scared of NRA. Guns are a health care issue."

    Not radical at all.  In fact, Murthy's position (that gun violence should be approached as a health policy/healthcare issue is the position of almost every medical organization.

    Former Surgeon General Richard Carmona wrote a letter to the president in December to protest nominating Dr. Murthy because he is not qualified. Dr. Carmona said that Dr. Murthy appeared to have "no significant related leadership experience and no formal public health training or experience."

    So he's unqualified because one guy thinks he's not ready?!?  You might want to consider more than a single opinion on Murthy's qualifications, simply because you don't like Murthy's views on guns.

    Anothe former Surgeon General Dr. David Satcher
    : "As Surgeon General, Dr. Murthy's impressive track record of accomplishments as an innovative and well-respected thought leader in healthcare will prove invaluable to the American people.

    [...]
    I feel that Dr. Murthy meets all of these qualifications superbly."

    Not to mention the very long list of public health experts and medical organizations that have come out in support of Murthy's nomination, including American Public Health Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, American Cancer Society, American Diabetes Association, American Heart Association, Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and many others.

    Doctors for America was Doctors for Obama in 2008, why should we be OK with Obama paying his political debts with critical government jobs? Being a campaign supporter should not be the primary qualification.

    Virtually every political appointment is filled by someone who agrees with the administration that is nominating them and is a supporter of that administration.  You haven't the slightest bit of evidence to support this silly claim ...

    ... as usual.

    Parent

    Fine if you like half the debate (none / 0) (#189)
    by Mikado Cat on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:57:11 AM EST
    All birds of a feather ideologues. Satcher supports a Medicare-for-all style single payer health plan, in which insurance companies would be eliminated and the government would pay health care costs directly to doctors, hospitals and other providers through the tax system.

    Parent
    Not really "half" (5.00 / 1) (#192)
    by Yman on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 09:42:30 AM EST
    You only offered the opinion of a single person that Murthy was not qualified.  

    But nice try at ignoring all the major medical organizations that share the opinion that he is, in fact, well-qualified.

    Parent

    It may have escaped your attention, (5.00 / 3) (#190)
    by Anne on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 09:32:10 AM EST
    but those who support a particular candidate do so on the basis of what that candidate believes in/advocates, after looking at what the other guys are all about.

    It may further have escaped your notice that when Republicans have the White House, they have a tendency to appoint/nominate people who supported them.

    Let me ask you this: suppose a Republican wins in 2016 - I don't think that's likely, but let's just suppose it happens.  And this Republican president nominates....Dr. Ben Carson to be Surgeon General.  The same Dr. Ben Carson who is a world-renowned neurosurgeon, but also the same Dr. Ben Carson who was touted as a candidate for president himself, who said some pretty radical things about Obama and Democrats in the run-up to 2016.

    Is he qualified?  Would you be telling us he's too closely aligned with the GOP to be objective, or to advocate for positions in the interest of promoting the nation's health?

    Somehow, I suspect you'd be fine with Ben Carson - primarily because he shares the worldview of the Republican Party and your own aversion to the current administration and Democrats.

    I'd further suspect you'd be making the argument that elections have consequences and presidents are entitled to have their choices for these positions confirmed.  I say that because it's an argument that Republicans always make when a Republican president is the one doing the nominating/appointing.

    It's also one the Republicans get amnesia about, a condition you seem to have developed yourself.

    Parent

    Murthy is a devout Obamacare (none / 0) (#188)
    by Mikado Cat on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:50:59 AM EST
    supporter, putting him as surgeon general would serve to destroy what little honest debate among doctors that still exists.

    Murthy is radically too partisan for the job which should be uniting, not dividing.

    Parent

    AN AXE LENGTH AWAY, vol. 303 (none / 0) (#162)
    by Dadler on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 01:50:22 PM EST
    He's one Mariachi who ain't gonna get played. (link)

    v. 302
    v. 301
    v. 300

    Have a good Saturday peeps. We were up early for Eli's ensemble and solo performance. Love watching and listening to my son blowing his century old trombone. Thing's a silver piece of art.

    Peace out.

    What is the history of this horn? (none / 0) (#163)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 01:59:37 PM EST
    All I know... (none / 0) (#195)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 10:59:33 AM EST
    ...is it was made about a century ago, 1915 or 1916 (or so we think, but the more I look into it the more I think it's about five years older than that), it's a class silver King, but with the added bonus of having a slide made by hand by H.N. White himself. At some point soon, though, as he goes into high school next year most likely, he's probably going to have to play a more modern horn. His classic trombone just wasn't made for 21st century play. The metal itself is such a thinner guage than a modern T-bone. But it works for him, and it looks really cool.

    Parent
    We bought it in Berkeley... (none / 0) (#196)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 11:02:45 AM EST
    ...a few years ago.

    Parent
    From whom did you buy the instrumen? (none / 0) (#206)
    by oculus on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:26:00 PM EST
    Just some guy... (none / 0) (#208)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:29:56 PM EST
    ...who bought and sold instruments at a little profit.

    Parent
    It would be interesting to know who owned the (none / 0) (#210)
    by oculus on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:32:19 PM EST
    instrument through the years.

    Parent
    Trombone ad from the period (none / 0) (#197)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 11:05:51 AM EST
    here's the horn itself (none / 0) (#198)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 11:16:08 AM EST
    I don't know anything about horns.. (5.00 / 1) (#200)
    by desertswine on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 01:21:58 PM EST
    but it looks pretty.

    Parent
    Beautiful engraving. Why a different horn (none / 0) (#207)
    by oculus on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:28:42 PM EST
    for high school?

    Parent
    Mostly because the old trombone... (none / 0) (#209)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:31:53 PM EST
    ...according to a few expert players I know through my brother-in-law in L.A., isn't really made for the kind of playing you do now. It's a much smaller bore and bell, doesn't give you the kind of volume you need as a first trombone, which he'll be as a freshman in high school. But, what do I know, maybe he'll use the thing 'till HE'S a century old.

    Parent
    And if it's not smaller bore I'm talking about (none / 0) (#211)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:33:33 PM EST
    ...it's because I am as musical as an old Rambler engine.

    Parent
    Makes sense. (none / 0) (#212)
    by oculus on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:47:36 PM EST
    Werther just died. Again. Met opera (none / 0) (#165)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 03:01:56 PM EST
    radio broadcast.  HD was also today and encore is this week too.

    Sigh...snow in the forecast for (none / 0) (#168)
    by Anne on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 03:43:53 PM EST
    late Sunday afternoon until Monday afternoon; 3-6 inches...

    Today, however, it is sunny and close to 60.

    I miss east coast culture. But not the weather. (5.00 / 1) (#169)
    by oculus on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 04:51:48 PM EST
    Barefoot, windows open, ceiling fans on (none / 0) (#170)
    by nycstray on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 06:07:00 PM EST
    and dirty from working in the veggie garden :) I LOVE 75 and sunny!

    Parent
    Don't rub it in! (none / 0) (#171)
    by Zorba on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 06:54:32 PM EST
    :-(

    Parent
    Does it help if I say allergy season has been (none / 0) (#172)
    by nycstray on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 07:06:56 PM EST
    here for a bit and going strong?  :)

    Tomorrow we're having a potluck at the community garden-to-be to welcome spring a bit early. Even though we really didn't have much of a winter and have had many days just like this, spring fever seems to be rampant! (I've been eying spring dresses and I don't wear dresses!) I think it's the longer days coupled with the great weather returning. Some of my friends were down at the marina kayaking and had shorts on! Oy. Time to see what my legs look like . .  :P

    Parent

    Nice (none / 0) (#173)
    by squeaky on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 07:29:00 PM EST
    I always worried that without east coast seasons the spring would be a big "so what"...  I did not think that the light change would kick in the "fever".  Nice..  sounds like you are in a good place.

    Parent
    We usually have seasons (none / 0) (#174)
    by nycstray on Sat Mar 15, 2014 at 07:51:37 PM EST
    just not as severe as the EC. This year fall was warmer and lasted forever. While you guys were having the polar vortex, I was wearing t-shirts out at the marina walking my dog :) Usually, it would have been cold and rainy. If El Nino happens next year, you can bet we will be sick of cold and downpours, like when I first moved here, and I personally will be beyond sick of muddy paws ;)

    Parent
    I would, too, lol... (none / 0) (#216)
    by Anne on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 03:23:35 PM EST
    It is in the upper-30's, thickly overcast and just plain raw. Son-in-law came over about 12:30 to help husband repair the gate that got crunched in half when high winds blew a tree onto it. Lucky that was only major damage from violent front. Temps dropped from 65 to 19 in a matter of hours. Keeping fingers crossed that road surface temps are high enough to prevent most stickage, and the morning commute won't be a(nother) nightmare...I'm at the point where I fear wishing for spring will be like wishing for flooding and violent t-storms...

    Parent
    BATF raids shop for records, not guns. (none / 0) (#183)
    by Mikado Cat on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 03:20:12 AM EST
    Apparently the law has a legal loophole for what is called an 80% lower receiver, think of it maybe like the raw chassis to a car, but without holes drilled for bolts etc, useful for nothing until finished. Sellers have been around for a few years, this week BATF started raids.

    One of them in the news got a TRO, got raided anyway, no guns seized, but all records taken.

    Link to a place called Examiner.com with at least one side of a fuller story.

    If somebody wanted to find a way to stir up the NRA base and get them ready for political action, it appears to be working.

    AN AXE LENGTH AWAY, vol. 304 (none / 0) (#194)
    by Dadler on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 10:53:35 AM EST
    If a loving God actually exists, they can assure you he sure as hell isn't some uptight honky. (link)

    And the rest of last weeks comics:

    v. 303
    v. 302
    v. 301
    v. 300
    v. 299
    v. 298

    Peace out, mi amigos. Only a couple more months of this, until my creative OCD is soothed by that magic "Vol. 365." So it goes in the twisted mind.

    Fred Phelps (none / 0) (#201)
    by desertswine on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 01:27:24 PM EST
    is reported to be near death.  Finally. Send me a postcard from you know where Fred.

    Crimea has voted to (none / 0) (#203)
    by Militarytracy on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 01:48:41 PM EST
    Join Russia

    Is anyone surprised? (5.00 / 2) (#205)
    by jbindc on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:21:58 PM EST
    A foregone result, (5.00 / 3) (#215)
    by KeysDan on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 03:13:32 PM EST
    but maybe a surprise to the CIA.

    Parent
    Washington (5.00 / 2) (#218)
    by lentinel on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 04:21:38 PM EST
    has rejected the results of this referendum as "a farce".

    Maybe it is and maybe it isn't.

    But how many farcical elections have we supported - including a few of our own that I can think of - notably the big stinker of 2000.

    Add to that the elections held by governments that we have set up and propped up in foreign countries.

    In short - if there is a stench about this one - and I for one do not know enough about it to make a definitive judgement - it could have been taken out of the playbook which we have authored.

    It seems like a case of "everybody does it" to me.

    What I hope is that it is not used as a rationale for a reestablishment of a cold war with Russia - with the attendant incremental increase in expenditures for more horrific weaponry and further cuts to expenditures for our social needs.

    Parent

    Founder of Westboro church (none / 0) (#213)
    by oculus on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:58:04 PM EST
    Has been excommunicated:  link