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Denver Health Care Event Went Smoothly

I just got back from the health care event at the Stout St. medical clinic for the homeless, sponsored by the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless and attended by Colorado Reps. Diana DeGette and Jared Polis, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. I got lots of pictures outside and was allowed inside for the press conference. I got right up front with the network camera crews and took lots of video. I also interviewed a 16 year old protester on why he objected to the health care bill. It will take me a while to upload, so check back.

There was no disruption of anything by the protesters. They were outside the clinic. Only 70 people, mostly press, were allowed inside the clinic. When I left at the end of the press conference, the street was empty. They had no effect on what went on inside. A total waste of their time.

Update: Videos and Photos below (all uploaded now.)

This is a 16 year old protester (identified in Denver Post as Sean Hannick) explaining to me why he opposes the health care reform bill. He lives in Lakewood, Colorado but grew up in Wasilla, Alaska.

Update: Here's another protester/loudmouth. He was pretty funny.

Update: Here's a 15 second video of the crowd shouting "health care now". I think the pro-health care reform folks outnumbered the protesters, but the protesters had more varied signs. Here are a few:

Now onto the remarks at the closed press conference (The videos are coming in): Rep. Diana DeGette was first:

Rep. Jared Polis was up next:

John P, Executive Director of the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, spoke next and as it turned out, had some really interesting information to share about the homeless:

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was the final speaker. Here's part 1:

Speaker Pelosi and Rep. DeGette took some questions. They weren't all friendly questions, one assumed there were great divisions among the Democrats on health care reform. Here's Speaker Pelosi and Rep. Diana DeGette discussing the negotiations for the bill and stating the Dems are unified in wanting health care reform.

Here is Speaker Pelosi answering the question I told her staffer I would ask, regarding the biggest misconceptions about the health care bill:

In response to another question, Speaker Pelosi addressed the Democrats' support for the public option (video here.)

I also got some handouts (which I've scanned as pdf docs and uploaded in case anyone wants to read them) on both the health care reform bill(what's in it for you), highlights of the 111th Congress, and health care for the homeless, the use of stimulus funds for Colorado, organized oppositon to the health care bill and some facts and figures on the homeless and specific projects the stimulus funds would be used for. One project is the expansion of the Stout St. Medical Center and another is a 98 apartment complex called Residence Uptown Lofts. They even included design photos.

Final word: I can't remember hearing a single thing about Medicare. It ended around 4:00 pm. I was one of the first to leave, and the street outside was deserted. Not a soul in sight. Must have been a big disappointment to the protesters.

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    Good. (5.00 / 4) (#2)
    by coigue on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:04:56 PM EST
    Ours in Napa was a mess of rude outbursts that had our local (conservative) newspaper criticizing the protesters for their tactics. (Our paper endorsed McCain)

    Yours was a presser, too (5.00 / 2) (#17)
    by Cream City on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:37:41 PM EST
    or a town hall?  My Congressperson is doing an event next week.  I got an invitation, but I don't know for sure what that means -- it seems odd to get an invitation to a town hall open to anyone.  I don't need to deal with idiot crowds and not get to ask or hear a thing, anyway, so I'm trying to figure out what to expect.  The distinction in these events, town halls or not, may be key.

    Parent
    agreed. unusual townhalls (none / 0) (#45)
    by coigue on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:04:48 PM EST
    that have expert panelists.

    Parent
    So it actually was a presser (5.00 / 2) (#13)
    by Cream City on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:06:57 PM EST
    and not a public event, a town hall -- a true one, to which anyone can come?  (I.e., not the more staged ones that some pols do for teevee.)

    I hadn't understood that from the earlier post (my bad, no doubt).  That explains why it went smoothly.  Wonder how a town hall would go in Denver?

    What are the odds the protester Jeralyn (5.00 / 5) (#14)
    by oculus on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:12:02 PM EST
    chose to interview would be born in Wasilla, Alaska?

    Video of 2 Americans living in Canada-how grateful (5.00 / 3) (#62)
    by jawbone on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 08:07:19 AM EST
    they are for Canadian health care; nicely done by Kat (Commeter at Think Progress).

    The downside? If they move back to the US, they won't be covered and they be bankrupted if they can get care.

    My take?

    Medicare for All...with a Robust Private Option

    Parent

    I Know, that cracked me up (none / 0) (#15)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:33:29 PM EST
    I wonder if he ever really lived in (5.00 / 1) (#18)
    by oculus on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:40:14 PM EST
    Canada.

    Parent
    Canada is the new France! (5.00 / 2) (#31)
    by denise k on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:58:59 PM EST
    From what he says, it sounds like Canada is the new out there, crazy, left-wing socialist country.  

    Parent
    Videos are coming (5.00 / 1) (#16)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:34:25 PM EST
    You Tube is pretty slow.

    I also got the press handout which I'm scanning and will upload -- it addresses both the health care bill and homelessness.

    you shoulda asked the kid... (5.00 / 3) (#23)
    by Dadler on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:18:51 PM EST
    ...if he supported a socialized military (which he does, despite the fact our founding fathers were VERY wary of a standing army), or socialized law enforcement, or disaster relief, or on and on and on.

    hell, you shoulda asked him for his working definition of socialism, i'd have loved to hear his "answer".

    nice work, though, as always, out there in the muck mixing it up.  good job, j.

    Ask a teenager (5.00 / 5) (#25)
    by Radiowalla on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:28:19 PM EST
    now while they know everything!

    Parent
    Hey kid, who pd. you to come here (none / 0) (#24)
    by oculus on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:22:37 PM EST
    and how much?

    Parent
    Seriously... (none / 0) (#27)
    by kdog on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:48:20 PM EST
    Like that one dudes sign up there, I'd love to show him mine.

    "It's your choice to have 2 occupations, bases in 90 odd countries, corporate giveaways, drug wars, prisons up the wazoo...it's my choice not to pay for it".  

    Imagine if those "socialist" policies were eliminated, we'd find out right quick who the "socialists" really are, I'll tell ya that much:)

    As soon as our teabagging friends are ready to have a serious chat about liberty and the legitimate role of government, I'm ready to listen...until then its simply a "my socialism is better than yours" argument.

    Parent

    heh (5.00 / 2) (#33)
    by nycstray on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:08:30 PM EST
    and all I could think of was "no viagra for you!"

    And the kid, wonder how much experience he actually has with trying to purchase healthcare and all that other stuff that goes with taking care of your health. I'm betting his mom is doing all the work .. .

    Lordy, this is depressing.

    Parent

    Still... (none / 0) (#36)
    by kdog on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:22:58 PM EST
    there is a bright side...people on the street making signs and giving a sh*t, even givin' a sh*t about total bullsh*t, ya gotta love it at least a little.

    Unless of course they are being paid...though I guess you could call that job creation:)

    What would be really depressing is to find out they're cointelpro, working for the man...that would have no brightside, in my view.

    Parent

    I'm cool with the genuine ones (none / 0) (#39)
    by nycstray on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:36:08 PM EST
    but the blindly following/paid shrills trying to stop the process, not so much.

    I wouldn't mind seeing townhalls with both sides expressing their views, asking questions and listening to their Reps try and answer based on an incomplete bill that nobody really knows what it is aside from the fact they've been sent to promote it. This shutting down the process is just sad. Everyone will get screwed except for the industry. And it will be mandated.

    Parent

    You nailed it... (none / 0) (#46)
    by kdog on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:09:05 PM EST
    Mandated dogsh*t comin' at us in some shape or form...couldn't have said it better myself.  I can smell it already.

    Parent
    I like the sign about paying for abortion. (5.00 / 2) (#35)
    by Chuck0 on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:22:22 PM EST
    How come that didn't fly when I told the IRS I didn't want to pay for invading Iraq?

    You're not a "values" voter (5.00 / 1) (#37)
    by andgarden on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:26:19 PM EST
    Only right wingers have values.

    Parent
    Well, (none / 0) (#57)
    by bocajeff on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 01:00:35 AM EST
    there is a difference between individual actions and those that are collective in nature.

    Parent
    Iraq vs. Health care (none / 0) (#74)
    by dml341 on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 04:16:17 PM EST
    The money for Iraq is supports obligations of the federal government under Article I, Section 8 of the U. S. Constitution.   There is no constitutional authority for providing health care.  If there was such a mandate, it would be nice if we could find a way to respect the privacy of individuals.  

    I would implore EVERYONE to actually read H.R. 3200 before taking a passionate stance either FOR or AGAINST this reform.   I think all Americans want to maintain global leadership on health care.  The question is how do we do that in a sustainable way.   Details DO matter.

    Parent

    I look forward (none / 0) (#76)
    by Steve M on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 06:37:10 PM EST
    to your lawsuit seeking to declare Medicare unconstitutional.  Hint: losing argument.  Just because you say there is no constitutional authority doesn't make it so.

    Parent
    Interesting how several of the signs (5.00 / 2) (#47)
    by nycstray on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:15:03 PM EST
    are done in the same handwriting but carried by different folks. Were they handing them out? In the photo with the guy in the Hitler t-shirt, you can see 3 of them.

    I'm guessing... (none / 0) (#49)
    by MileHi Hawkeye on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:22:55 PM EST
    ...the two organizers in the second photo had something to do with the signs.  

    Ben was right, you can tell who's getting paid from the shoes.  

    "Grassroot" my behind.

    Parent

    they have the organizer thing wrong (none / 0) (#50)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:39:29 PM EST
    The guy they call the organizer in blue jacket and tan pants and tie was inside with the Dems, I photographed him here.

    And the 16 year old lives in Lakewood, CO (10 minutes west of Denver) -- he grew up in Wasilia.

    Parent

    Indeed. (none / 0) (#53)
    by MileHi Hawkeye on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 10:16:44 PM EST
    Congressional aides perhaps?  

    10 minutes to Lakewood?  I wish!  

    Parent

    yes, he was a Dem aide (none / 0) (#56)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 10:51:52 PM EST
    not a lobbyist for the opposition.

    It takes me 10 minutes to get to Lakewood from downtown, it's under 10 miles. (I know because the jail in Golden is 15 miles and takes me 20 minutes from downtown.)

    Parent

    still paid, so I'm right about (5.00 / 1) (#60)
    by Ben Masel on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 02:05:18 AM EST
    the shoes.

    Parent
    You must have a super secret... (none / 0) (#65)
    by MileHi Hawkeye on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 08:41:24 AM EST
    ...lawyers only route then.  My straight shot from Capital Hill out 8th/6th Ave takes 15 to 20 minutes in rush hour.  

    Parent
    WasiLLA. (none / 0) (#58)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 01:11:05 AM EST
    Thank you for taking the time to do this Jeralyn (5.00 / 1) (#66)
    by ruffian on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 09:07:19 AM EST
    Nice to get videos of what went on. I'm going to try to find one in my area too.

    When can we see the video? (none / 0) (#1)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:00:16 PM EST


    Who says bloggers don't do (5.00 / 2) (#3)
    by oculus on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:08:07 PM EST
    investigative journalism?

    Parent
    I don't (none / 0) (#5)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:12:59 PM EST
    But J did.

    I really look forward to her post on this.

    Parent

    Just as oculus (5.00 / 2) (#6)
    by Steve M on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:19:54 PM EST
    looks forward to your post on the Bill Clinton meeting w/ bloggers!

    Parent
    I have nothing interesting (none / 0) (#7)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:22:22 PM EST
    left to say about that meeting.

    Hell, I do not think what I did say was that interesting.

    Parent

    What you did say left me puzzled. (none / 0) (#8)
    by oculus on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:23:26 PM EST
    But isn't there more mundane info to share?  Impressions?  

    Parent
    To be fair ... (none / 0) (#11)
    by Robot Porter on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:37:13 PM EST
    I would call this reporting, not investigative journalism.

    But, still, more than most bloggers do.

    Parent

    it took me (5.00 / 3) (#54)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 10:48:46 PM EST
    5 hours without getting up from my chair to get these videos, pictures and documents uploaded. That's in addition to the 3 hours spent at the event.  A full 8 hour day, and no law work accomplished.

    It is not investigative journalism but it is reporting. And, it turns out, I may have been the only progressive blogger who got inside the event to make these videos.

    Considering no one paid me a dime to do it, and I lost a day's work, I'm pretty pleased with the effort.

    Parent

    I'm working on it (none / 0) (#21)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:11:25 PM EST
    That's great, Jeralyn! (none / 0) (#4)
    by Dalton Hoffine on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:12:15 PM EST
    I was honestly a little worried about it turning into one of the bigger outbursts, what with both Pelosi and Polis being somewhat polarizing figures (one for no good reason, of course).

    I can't wait to see the video! You are quite the multi-talented individual... a lawyer, a blogger, AND a journalist! And good at all three, to boot. :)

    I'm curious to hear what (none / 0) (#9)
    by dk on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:25:26 PM EST
    "smoothly" means, exactly.  For example, were any single payer advocates allowed in to ask (or did any in the media ask) why Pelosi, who recently said she was a single payer proponent for 30 years, suddenly decide to try to ram through a giveaway to for-profit insurance companies?

    In the same vein, I hope someone asked (5.00 / 1) (#10)
    by oculus on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:35:02 PM EST
    Pelosi if the Senate will honor the President's side agreement with big pharma?  

    Parent
    Yeah, I'd love to hear the stammering (5.00 / 2) (#12)
    by Anne on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 05:49:13 PM EST
    that accompanies that answer...

    Parent
    The lobby in charge of setting up the right wing (none / 0) (#19)
    by Wile ECoyote on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 06:48:29 PM EST
    protesters must have run out of money for this one.  I think it will be the MO of the dems now is to do the rally inside rooms where they can legally limit who will be there.  Fine by me.  

    Good idea having them where people (none / 0) (#68)
    by ruffian on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 09:12:10 AM EST
    are really suffering also. It must be harder to scream 'no no no' in the presence of homeless and others being badly served by the system we have now.

    Parent
    I'll wager money (none / 0) (#73)
    by Wile ECoyote on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 03:45:43 PM EST
    Pelosi was not in the same room as any homeless.  Liberal Mantra:  Let someone else do it.

    Parent
    nothing but a photo op (none / 0) (#20)
    by diogenes on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:11:04 PM EST
    LBJ could have staged similar photo ops in American Legion posts and kept out protestors in 1968; what exactly would have this proven?

    Not true (none / 0) (#22)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:12:11 PM EST
    it was very moving, particularly the stuff about the homeless which is coming.

    Parent
    Jeralyn, did you see (none / 0) (#26)
    by dk on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:46:39 PM EST
    or talk to any people opposing the plan from the left, or only right wing opposition?

    only right wing (none / 0) (#48)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:21:50 PM EST
    that I saw but there really wasn't any discussion. Just protesters outside and media inside.

    Parent
    It was a presser, not a town hall meeting? (none / 0) (#59)
    by BrassTacks on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 01:16:28 AM EST
    Thats rather disappointing.  They may as well have been in DC.  

    Parent
    I was there too (none / 0) (#28)
    by progressiveinvolvement on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:50:06 PM EST
    Jeralyn makes some good points, but our side could be doing a better job of showing up to promote health care reform.  My take:  www.progressiveinvolvement.com

    @dk (none / 0) (#29)
    by progressiveinvolvement on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:53:37 PM EST
    There were several people who held signs saying "single payer," but they seemed supportive of Obama/Pelosi et. al.

    Interesting. Did you speak with (none / 0) (#30)
    by dk on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 07:57:31 PM EST
    them?  I'm curious if they knew that Obama and Pelosi rejected single payer and kept them from having a seat at the table in crafting the bills currently in Congress.

    Parent
    I'm guessing (none / 0) (#32)
    by progressiveinvolvement on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:07:04 PM EST
    but, given a choice between being seen to side with the teabaggers or the administration, they chose the administration.

    Is it necessary (none / 0) (#34)
    by dk on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:09:43 PM EST
    to side with one or the other?  Obviously it doesn't on an intellectual, or political, level.  Do you mean emotionally (meaning at a rally, there is sort of a peer pressure mentality that one must "choose a side" even if one doesn't really believe in either one)?

    Parent
    no peer pressure (none / 0) (#40)
    by progressiveinvolvement on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:52:55 PM EST
    In fact, the teabaggers seemed to be of a single mind--anti-Obama--but the rest were a mixture of Dems, regular liberals (for lack of a better term), and single-payer types.

    Parent
    The questions were pre-sceened, right? (none / 0) (#38)
    by lambertstrether on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:33:57 PM EST
    Any advocates of Medicare for All?

    Which would solve a lot of problems of being homeless, yes?

    they came out and asked ahead of time (none / 0) (#42)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 08:58:26 PM EST
    who had questions, and they wrote them down, but when they answered questions, it was from whoever asked. Medicare wasn't mentioned.

    Parent
    Jeralyn-- (none / 0) (#44)
    by MileHi Hawkeye on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:01:28 PM EST
    Did you see the swastika guy at the event today?

    Tampa (none / 0) (#51)
    by SOS on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:43:47 PM EST
    Pile on the Swag (none / 0) (#52)
    by SOS on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 09:46:50 PM EST
    The Health Insurers Have Already Won
    How UnitedHealth and rival carriers, maneuvering behind the scenes in Washington, shaped health-care reform for their own benefit.

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/09_33/b4143034820260.htm

    please put your links in html format (none / 0) (#55)
    by Jeralyn on Thu Aug 06, 2009 at 10:49:30 PM EST
    they will skew the site and have to be deleted. And this post is about the Denver event.

    Parent
    not sure (none / 0) (#61)
    by mymy on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 07:35:40 AM EST
    why this was consider democracy in action?Only people who agreed with the speakers were allowed in the event.Where is the exchange of ideas our President says he is in favor off

    that's incorrect (none / 0) (#69)
    by Jeralyn on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 12:16:45 PM EST
    All media were invited, it wasn't just media who agreed with the speakers. UPI and all the local tv networks were there, including the local Fox station.

    Parent
    i hate to break the news to you mymy, (none / 0) (#63)
    by cpinva on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 08:17:24 AM EST
    Where is the exchange of ideas our President says he is in favor off

    but once single-payer was unceremoniously dumped, any "exchange of ideas" ceased to be. at this point, it's merely a matter of how much more public funds will be skimmed by the private insurers.

    thats (none / 0) (#64)
    by mymy on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 08:35:07 AM EST
    the problem Jerayln is saying how well this event went.I don't see how this was a good event.Maybe a good Press conference,but not a Health Care Event

    Business Week: Big Insurers have already won the (none / 0) (#67)
    by jawbone on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 09:07:21 AM EST
    the health care debate, per the article. Their victory is our loss.
    Mass posted about this article:

    As the health reform fight shifts this month from a vacationing Washington to congressional districts and local airwaves around the country, much more of the battle than most people realize is already over. The likely victors are insurance giants such as UnitedHealth Group (UNH), Aetna (AET), and WellPoint (WLP). The carriers have succeeded in redefining the terms of the reform debate to such a degree that no matter what specifics emerge in the voluminous bill Congress may send to President Obama this fall, the insurance industry will emerge more profitable. Health reform could come with a $1 trillion price tag over the next decade, and it may complicate matters for some large employers. But insurance CEOs ought to be smiling.

    Their stock seems to rise with every announcement from Baucus that there is no real action in his committee. Think they feel they're control the outcome of any reconciiation?

    We can't afford to subsidize high premiums for the for-profit Big Insurance Parasites (BIPs)--the system will collapse. But the execs will be grinning big sh$t-eating grins....

    Obama wants to try to cut the increase in health care costs over the next 10 years. He's told the public that without doing "something" BIP premiums will increase 100%*. BUT.......with his "plan"...something will cut costs...and premiums will increase only 50-70% (!!!).

    Consider me unimpressed. The BIPs have achieved what they wanted: Obama is not really pushing a genuine public plan; what's being hinted at, somewhat fleshed out is Romney Care for the nation. Mandated purchase of BIP offerings; subsidies which won't help many; and little cost containment.

    Is that why Obama is eyeing Medicare and Medicaid for cuts and "controls"?

    Now, Medicare for All, even with a robust private option, as a single payer plan would save $350-$400 Billion each year, meaning $350-$400 Trillion in savings over 10 years. Per Dr. David Himmelstein of Harvard and PNHP.org, who has done the studies on health care costs used by both sides of the debate. With those savings, everyone could be covered, comprehensively, from day one, dollar one--no co-pays, no deductibles.

    But Obama kept that off the table, even out of the debate, leaving the BIPs able to achieve their goals of increasing their market with mandates (from the president who as candidate said he was against them).

    Single payer would affect the BIPs--and their profitability apparently must be preserved at great cost to the public and the government. Subsidies to pay for the high cost of BIPs' premiums is a cost borne by both the public, as individual payers, and the government, which is again the public, paying taxes. Obama does seem to come donw on the side of corporatists.

    There's one small chance for rational health care provisioning in this country: Rep. Weiner's Medicare for All single payer type bill, based closely on HR 676, to be voted on in September in the House.

    Of course, the NYTimes and WaPo aren't covering this--that might stir up enthusiasm among the little people who are supposed to just take whatever their betters give them.

    Not sure about you, but I'm feeling like a mushroom. Guess that happens when you're thrown under the bus and it's not going anywhere. All this rain, cool growing weather, kept in the dark: Perfect for treating the public like mushrooms.

    A once in a generation opportunity for real health care reform is a terrible thing to waste.

    Rep. Bill Pascrell, a D(???) from NJ, said on WNYC this past Tuesday that maybe in 50 years single payer might be implemented in the US--FIFTY YEARS, people. I'll be long gone, but the younger generations may be messed over for another half century? FSM help us all.

    *My Parasite has increased premiums between 17 and 20% each year, so in 10 years the increase could be astronomical, and the Parasite will kill the host. (I had to stop adding 18% after 4 years, it was just too scary. The Big Insurance Parasites will eat the nation alive.)

    Pray FSM that Medicare is not messed up by Obama's health care "deform"!

    Jeralyn, thanks for posting this info. (none / 0) (#70)
    by Pragmatist on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 12:27:18 PM EST
    It's too bad Tampa & St Louis didn't go as well.  Unfortunately, it's hard to claim the moral high ground (not you Jeralyn) when the health care reform 'supporters' resort to more severe tactics than their opponents -- sending a protester in St Louis to the ER & shoving older people around in Tampa.  What can't we have civil discourse anymore?  (Rhetorical).  It's ok to disagree; in fact, it's healthy.  An occasional hoot is ok as long as we can return to having a discussion/dialog.  But, shoving people is uncalled for.  I intend to attend a town hall and ask questions.  I'm sure I'll be viewed as a 'brownshirt' for asking a question which questions conventional wisdom.  I must be doing something right though because folks here view me as a conservative and folks at conservative sites view me as a liberal.  It's good be a conundrum wrapped in an enigma.

    You will be viewed as a brownshirt if ... (none / 0) (#71)
    by FreakyBeaky on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 01:27:32 PM EST
    ... you act like one.  Last time I checked, asking a question wasn't even close.

    I hope you're correct... (none / 0) (#72)
    by Pragmatist on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 02:16:29 PM EST
    just to be sure, I'll wear my very old and faded blue "the only easy day was yesterday" t-shirt.  Seriously, I only want some dialog and I would like for my Rep to explain some of the language in the proposed legislation.  I prefer straight forward statements not open to interpretation vice some of the legalize.  So, I'll give my rep an opportunity to shine.

    Parent
    YES !!!! (none / 0) (#75)
    by dml341 on Fri Aug 07, 2009 at 04:22:45 PM EST
    informed, calm, rational debate of what is available in H.R. 3200 would be WONDERFUL.   Why can't we stop the demonization of each other ???


    Parent