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Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congress

While I doubt Tom Tancredo is doing this to help Dog the Bounty Hunter (Duane Chapman) as opposed to trying to further his xenophobic immigration platform, I'm all for the result:

U.S. Rep. Tom Tancredo and 28 other members of Congress recently sent a letter to Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice, asking her to deny the extradition of Duane "Dog" Chapman to Mexico.

"Thanks to Mr. Chapman, Luster is now serving a 124-year sentence," said Tancredo. "It seems that Mexican authorities are pressing this case only because they are so stung by the embarrassment of failing where Mr. Chapman succeeded."

This part of Tancredo's statement fits with my understanding of the case:

In 2003, Chapman received a tip regarding the whereabouts of Andrew Luster, who disappeared during his trial for rape. Chapman went to Mexico to act on this tip, and was accompanied by a local Mexican police officer -- who he agreed to pay. He was also in communication with U.S. officials, who were aware of his activities, Tancredo said.

Dog should not be extradited to Mexico. He came back to the U.S. because that's what his lawyers told him to do. Good faith reliance upon advice of counsel would be a defense in the U.S.

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  • As I've written many times here, Dog is a long-time personal friend of mine . He used to make bonds for my clients when he lived primarily in Colorado. In recent years, I've been friends with both him and his wife. The U.S. kidnaps criminals from other countries and it's allowed. Dog was trying to follow the rules and work with the FBI. I don't support bond jumpers like Andrew Luster, particularly when they have been convicted of violent crimes. Dog got the short end of the stick on this one.

    In a nation of 300 million people some Congresscritters can find plenty of time to assist individual celebrities with their self-made problems while leaving the nation's business unattended. Is it any wonder that the public's dissatisfaction with Congress runs so high?

    i realize you're a defense atty, but i would think you'd prefer to argue this case on its merits, not just because you don't think it's right.
    cpinva, She does when she states:
    He came back to the U.S. because that's what his lawyers told him to do. Good faith reliance upon advice of counsel would be a defense in the U.S.


    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#2)
    by Linkmeister on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 12:36:54 AM EST
    I'd question the motives too, since none of the Hawai'i delegation was even asked to co-sign the letter, according to Neil Abercrombie (D-Hawai'i-01).

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#4)
    by Andreas on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 01:06:26 AM EST
    He was also in communication with U.S. officials, who were aware of his activities, Tancredo said.
    The US government was aware of the plans of Duane Chapman in Mexico? And now the Republican Party is active to "help" him? That is really interesting.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#5)
    by Che's Lounge on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 07:00:05 AM EST
    JM, The State of CA also screwed the pooch. They let him get away. Don't be so quick to blame Mexico for our justice system's failures.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#6)
    by Che's Lounge on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 07:02:28 AM EST
    Sorry JM, that quote I objected to was by Tancredo, which explains the racist inference.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#7)
    by John Mann on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 07:10:26 AM EST
    Amazing. BTW, Che, Here's where I am now.

    If I am not mistaken, extraditions of American nationals are almost always denied anyway, whether it is 'Dog' or anybody else (unless it is an international incident; see James Earl Ray). I expect the request to be denied and it won't have anything to do with Tim Tancredo. While it is possible that we have entered into a treaty that dosen't have some type of provision allowing us to deny extradition to American citizens I don't know of it. A good example of the common practice of denying extradition requests would be the Neidecker Case.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#8)
    by cpinva on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 10:09:04 AM EST
    i must admit jeralyn, you continue to surprise me, with your support of this clown. let's see if i have the facts straight: 1. dog gets tip wanted man is hiding in mexico. 2. dog decides to go to mexico, and commit an illegal act. 3. dog tells u.s. authorities that he's going to commit an illegal act in mexico, for pay. 4. mexican authorities request that the u.s. extradite dog back to mexico, to face criminal charges, for the illegal act that he knowingly committed. 5. u.s. authorities don't want to send dog back, to face legitimate criminal charges in mexico, because dog is their bud. that pretty much sum it up? i'm kind of disappointed in your situational ethics, i expected better of you, as you do of public officials. in essence, you're saying it's ok to violate the laws of another country, as long the reason meets your exacting specifications, and the guy has a really bad haircut. i realize you're a defense atty, but i would think you'd prefer to argue this case on its merits, not just because you don't think it's right.

    Well then I hope that when a bounty hunter from India comes into the US and drags the head of Dow Jones off to india to answer his indictment and conviction for the Bhopal tragedy we can turn as blind an eye to our laws as we are asking the Mexicans to do. i do not see the glorification of thugs such as this animal as healthy for the law or the country.

    JM, really, can you explain your interest in this guy? He would seem to be on the opposite side of the crime and punishment ideological spectrum from you...

    Thanks JM. Sorry you had to repeat, but many of us probably don't read every thread every day... :-)

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#14)
    by Andreas on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 01:06:36 PM EST
    Talkleft wrote:
    The U.S. kidnaps criminals from other countries and it's allowed.
    Which countries allow the US to kidnap people within their borders? Mexico almost certainly does not belong to those countries. Talkleft also wrote:
    I don't support bond jumpers like Andrew Luster,
    I doubt that anyone here "supports" Andrew Luster. With that type of argument opponents of the war were slandered to support Saddam Hussein. It is called demagogy.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#16)
    by John Mann on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 03:23:16 PM EST
    The U.S. kidnaps criminals from other countries and it's allowed.
    Yes, and most of the people on this board complain about routine violations of another country's sovereignty.
    Dog was trying to follow the rules and work with the FBI.
    I didn't know the FBI was authorized to operate in Mexico. In any event, "Dog" is not likely to ever set foot in Mexico again, and he and his spouse are undoubtedly much more wealthy from the experience.

    Talkleft wrote:
    The U.S. kidnaps criminals from other countries and it's allowed.
    So two wrongs make a right? Surely you've read the case of US. v. Alvarez-Machain to see the specious reasoning on why the US syas its ok. So in this case, why invoke the treaty? Why not just kidnap him and take him to Mexico for trial? Just because we do it does not make it right.

    I certainly don't condone the DEA kidnapping people...and yes, the US. v. Alvarez-Machain case is the one I was thinking of. But for the U.S. to do it and then abandon Dog isn't right either. Dog wasn't kidnapping Luster to personally bring him back to the U.S., he was snatching him to turn him over to legal authorities in Mexico, who had the FBI done their job, would have had extradition papers ready. This whole thing has cost Dog a small fortune, he was denied the reward money and has huge legal bills. I don't know why anyone thinks he profited off it.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#17)
    by kdog on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 03:56:54 PM EST
    I gotta side against the bounty hunter on this one too. Though I'm glad a rapist was brought to justice, I can't condone visitors to foreign countries grabbing people off the street. I'm against the CIA doing it, and I'm against Dog doing it. Either you cooperate with the local government on their terms or your man got away...better luck next time. Just as it is better to let 1000 guilty men go free than to convict one innocent, it is better to let 1000 bail jumpers get away than to give bounty hunters worldwide jurisdiction.

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter May Get Help From Congre (none / 0) (#18)
    by kdog on Thu Oct 12, 2006 at 03:56:54 PM EST
    And as for Congress helping him out, that's fine as long as they help everybody out. Would they do the same for Snoop Dogg?

    i dont think it would be a wise thing to send duane chapman and tim and leland to mexico. I think our people in the U.S. should not let this happen because they are our own. Morally they were in the right and it really should not be political it should be standing for what is right. They risk their lives but also their lives are in risk if they have to go back. they should not have the worry, we should protect our citizens

    Re: Dog the Bounty Hunter (none / 0) (#21)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Wed Oct 18, 2006 at 02:12:32 PM EST
    I heard Dog's lawyer on the radio yesterday.

    Apparently it's not only Dog but also his wife and daughter are under extradition for the same charges.

    The charges, meanwhile, are not for "bounty hunting," per se, but for "involuntary detention" or something along those lines.

    What they were charged with is a fairly low-level offense and he, at least, was released on a small $1500 bond.

    The attorney was supposed to meet with Mexican officials today to try to work something out.

    Mexico is a "civil law" or something jurisprudence, whatever that is, in contrast to the US.