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Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests

Now that Governor Arnold has denied clemency to Donald Beardslee, it appears certain the execution will occur on schedule. Here are the protest sites around the state, if you want to join in:

Tuesday, January 18th

San Quentin State Prison
RALLY BEGINS AT 8:00PM
EAST GATE OF SAN QUENTIN
You can park on Francisco Blvd. E. but expect to walk 1-1.5 Miles to
get to the East Gate of San Quentin.
Contact: stefanie@deathpenalty.org or 415-243-0143

Los Angeles
RALLY AT 7:00 P.M.
WESTWOOD FEDERAL BUILDING
11000 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (Corner of Veteran)
MARCH AT 8:30 P.M. to ST. ALBANS CHURCH for a VIGIL (580 Hilgard
Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90024)
Contact: rohdevictr@aol.com

Sacramento
VIGIL FROM 11PM to 12:30AM
State Capitol Building
11th & L Streets
Contact: lyga@comcast.net

San Francisco
A group will depart from San Francisco's Palace of the Legion of Honor at 7:00AM and walk to arrive at the gates of San Quentin by 6:00pm. Please contact Rev. Lyle Grosjean for more information at
510-895-8203/510-368-3368 or Rfk40a@aol.com. Support drivers are also
needed.

Santa Barbara
For more information contact: robertso@math.ucsb.edu

Monterey
For more information contact: rkoufax@aol.com

San Diego
Vigil from 4:45PM to 6:00PM
San Diego Hall of Justice
330 West Broadway
For more information contact: SGhelardi@aol.com

Orange County
Vigil at 5PM
Circle of Orange
For more information contact: janurban@adelphia.net

Riverside
For more information contact: iedpf@yahoo.com

Santa Cruz
Vigil - 8PM to Midnight
Meet at Town Clock
For more information contact: marilyns@cruzio.com

Marin
Vigil at St. Pauls Episcopal Church
For more information contact: sseverin@igc.org

El Cerrito
Vigil at 7:30PM and Carpool to San Quentin
Church of St. John the Baptist
11150 San Pablo Ave.
For more information contact: 510-232-5659

Stefanie L. Faucher
Program Director
Death Penalty Focus
870 Market St. Ste. 859
San Francisco, CA 94102
Tel. 415-243-0143
Fax 415-243-0994
stefanie@deathpenalty.org
www.deathpenalty.org
www.californiamoratorium.org

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  • Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#1)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 04:00:42 PM EST
    Protests? Onlee a girlee - mahn cares about protests. Eet would take a robot from the futcha to terminate me for this mahn to say "Ah'll be back" and mean it.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#2)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 04:04:19 PM EST
    Why? This is not like there is any doubt whether he did it or not. We are definitely not executing the wrong guy here. And oh yeah, if I kill someone, I will claim I am insane, or retarded or something like that too. It does not take a genious to pretend to be dumb.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#3)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 04:09:43 PM EST
    Why? Does Governor Cardboard risk losing popularity if he fries a guy? Perhaps someone can try to explain why Gov. 'bang might put aside public adulation for the first time in his short career.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#4)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 04:23:21 PM EST
    He murdered 2 women while on parole for a previous murder conviction. This man is a walking example of why we have a death penalty here in California.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#5)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 04:54:25 PM EST
    Remember when life WITHOUT parole actually meant life WITHOUT parole? The death penalty becomes a dinosaur when we start honoring life WITHOUT parole. That said, and while I know NOTHING about California's law, what is stopping Arnold from "reducing" this death sentence to life WITHOUT parole (other than the above)? Seems to me like he could get a lot more political mileage coming off looking like a merciful (compassionate?) Republican - especially in such a Democratic state like California. Just a thought.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#6)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 05:12:11 PM EST
    This guy needs to go. It's not like there's any way it's not the right guy. Good for Arnold. Sometimes taking someone's liberty away just isn't enough!!

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#7)
    by pigwiggle on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 05:34:54 PM EST
    Real Men Love Jesus- Please explain how ‘thou shalt not kill’ gets translated into ‘thou shalt only kill murdering rapists’.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#9)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 07:07:07 PM EST
    Or rather, he might deserve it, but there's no value to killing him.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#10)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 07:18:30 PM EST
    Free Radical: It's all in the implementation. Life without parole works and works well. Are there problems? Of course; you just named one of many. Frankly, I could never understand why prisoners are allowed to workout. THAT is one privilege I would be taking away. Same goes for ANY media. The name of the game is CONTROL and, today, too few prisons have basic control over prisoners. Talk Left and I may disagree on these two items but, from what I've seen, I suspect it would work wonders. Anyway, the whole point, FR, is to get the state out of the business of killing its own citizens (and especially its non-citizens) regardless of the crime. We're all safer when the state loses the rationale for legally-sanctioned murder-by-the-state in all but name. You'd think this would be a no-brainer in such an allegedly, overwhelmingly Christian nation. And why does it always seem that Christian fundamentalists are of the Old Testament persuasion? I mean, if we've got to have any fundamentalism at all, could we have a lot more of the New Testament variety, please?

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#11)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 07:27:05 PM EST
    I have a very utilitarian aproach to the entire criminal justice system. I see little to no value in killing people, because statistically we know deterence is a big fat lie. Whether they deserve it, or the state has the right murder people, is of little importance to me compared to the over-all effect to society. Similarly, I see no benefit to having life without parole. If someone is really a bad person, then hopefully they won't be given parole, but it should at least be there as an incentive. As for the no work-out, no media issue, I'm torn. If you make people bored enough, they're bound to cause more trouble than they would otherwise. I'd rather have less densely populated prisons with more constructive things for inmates to do like schooling or working, and less of the media/workout type mindless activities.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#12)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 18, 2005 at 10:51:02 PM EST
    FR: I think you're on to something there. Don't get me wrong, I think precluding workouts is good only so that prisoners don't become a danger to both their guards and other prisoners. Also, deprivation of all media is not meant as punishment but as a means of rehabilitation. Let's face it, apart from a prisoner's basic human and civil rights, the system effectively OWNS those committed to life WITHOUT parole. Perhaps we need to look to the Japanese penal system for some guidance and inspiration. Most of all, we need to be guided by compassion, no matter how heinous the crimes. For most of my life, I admit to being a true believer in capital punishment. What was the epiphany? Well, after representing a few hundred of these lost souls (NOT capital offenders, just run-of-the-mill felons), I came to realize how utterly empty their lives almost always are. They are literally the dregs of society, the lumpenprole. No one cares about them, least of all themselves. Shouldn't somebody? Shouldn't they receive some sort of compassion from society, while incarcerated for their crimes? I all too often see the Old Testament; where's the New? Probably the most pathetic thing in the world is to have a client who thinks that "going in" isn't bad at all. Many tell me that, at least, they'll know where they'll be sleeping for the foreseeable future and that they're guaranteed three squares a day and they won't be killed on the streets - and that they might make a friend or two. It frightens AND repels me to know that so many of my clients see jail - and even prison - as not only a refuge from this mad world, but a haven in a storm. Which leads me to believe that the vast and overwhelming majority of prisoners are suffering from mental illness of some degree. Nothing makes one appreciate one's freedom like KNOWING you have the right to freely walk into and out of a jail and prison; freedom is that much sweeter. I wish those of us who so callously judge these people, and are fervent - as I once was - supporters of capital punishment, took the time to get to know some of them. Most prisoners that I know state that they got exactly what they deserved. The level of candor and honesty is astonishing - in most. I've found some to be the most humane people I have ever met. The only difference between myself and them is that they f**ked up. My heart does NOT bleed for them. They got what they deserved, as they almost always freely admit. But state-sanctioned killing? Especially in an age of state-sanctioned torture? I find both especially repugnant in this, our vaunted democracy. It simply must stop.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#13)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 02:27:26 AM EST
    Seems to me like he could get a lot more political mileage coming off looking like a merciful (compassionate?) Republican - especially in such a Democratic state like California. Just a thought.
    Why should he be shown compassion? Did he show any for the multiple people he killed? That he killed over a bad drug deal? No. Tell me this, Lavocat... If a man who was on parole for murder, no doubt that he done it, came to your home and proceeded to rob you - then finding you're at home, decided it's better off to have no witnesses kills your wife and children - God forbid - yet you survived.... Tell me, could you HONESTLY say that you would not want to see that man dead? It's not judging someone callously. It's judging them for their crime. If they've murdered once, the should get life. If they murder twice then it appears they haven't learned anything from the first time - odds are, they're not going to learn anything this time other than how to be a better killer.
    For most of my life, I admit to being a true believer in capital punishment. What was the epiphany? Well, after representing a few hundred of these lost souls (NOT capital offenders, just run-of-the-mill felons), I came to realize how utterly empty their lives almost always are. They are literally the dregs of society, the lumpenprole. No one cares about them, least of all themselves.
    So you've changed your mind because you've represented a few hundred lost souls that haven't committed a crime that would ever warrant the death penalty? Hmmm... *SIGH*

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#14)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 02:29:35 AM EST
    Sorry.. Forgot to put my name on that post! Also, I want to clarify something I said so there isn't an misunderstandings - when I said "God forbid" : I mean that I hope that would never happen to your family.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#15)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 08:19:00 AM EST
    Todd,
    kills your wife and children - God forbid - yet you survived.... Tell me, could you HONESTLY say that you would not want to see that man dead?
    Of course he/she would, blockhead. Ten thousand years ago Lavocat and her/his friends/relatives/neighbors would have formed a mob and beaten/stoned the person to death. Or Lavocat and the killer could have been subject to tribal/family laws, where by the way a lot of innocent people were killed for dishonor and vendetta "crimes". Then a thing called civilization happened and folks thought that maybe we should have a uniform code of laws for a city/nation to live by, and that folks should maybe have a chance to defend themselves. There was also a spiritual revolution based on Christ's teachings which said that God's presence can be seen in the least among us. And to love the sinner. And to turn the other cheek. And to reflect on our own weaknesses and sins before "casting the first stone." Christ was given the Death Penalty for Sedition against the Romans, a sentence the imaginary right-wingers of his time would have applauded, I'm sure. Oh yeah, and also a lot of desperate, innocent, marginally culpable and mentally challenged people were hung, beheaded, burnt to death, cut into pieces, etc., etc. For thousands of years there were no juries and the prosecution had an unassailable hold on the scales of justice. Rarely did an accusation not equal a conviction. Eventually the poor and disenfranchised got tired of being treated so unfairly - starved and killed for complaining. The enlightenment happened. Revolutions happened. Government BY THE PEOPLE and FOR THE PEOPLE became a self-evident truth and an inalienable right. We created juries, ensured that defendents were represented as well as checks and balances to reign in the prosocutorial zeal created by the conflict of interest inherent when a prosecutor is rewarded for wins. Most importantly, we incorporated Christian and Western principles into a new kind of justice that reached beyond the Hammurabic 'eye for an eye'. We said that the punishment should fit the INTENT of the defendent rather than the end result of his actions. For example, if I ran a stop sign and killed a little boy, under eye for an eye, either me or my son should forfeit our lives. Under democratic justice, as I didn't INTEND to hurt anyone my punishment should befit someone guilty of gross negligence resulting in death, who should have known that the consequences of disobeying traffic laws can be fatal. However, old habits die hard. Certain crimes sound the call for blood and the real reason people are incarcerated - to protect the rest of us from them - is lost. To me, if someone is no longer a danger, there is no point in keeping them in jail (it costs me the taxpayer a lot of money!. With all due respect and sympathy to victims, the justice system isn't about justice for them, it's about justice for the accused. Certainly some crimes are so horrific, affront us so much that we have a quite natural urge to repeal their right to even be a human - to live. However, much more often the death penalty is meted out to the killers of attractive, caucasian, soundbite friendly, high SES victims. To poorly defended, poorly raised, mentally challenged individuals whose lives may have no meaning to us or to the state. Don't forget, once the State claims the right to take lives, it also administers the line where life and death is drawn. Now I'm willing to give the Gov't. control over some tax money, but I just don't think they're up to the job of deciding life and death. I hope all of you "stone throwers" will go back to review this story and see that Mr. Beardslee was not the primary purveyor of these murders and received a disproportionately severe sentence to those who were. Also, he was more than a little slow. Clearly posessing violent tendencies and dangerous, it's easy for us to decide that the world would be better off without him. Will he be more cognizant of the reason he is being killed than he was of the reason's he killed others? Is justice done more than if he were institutionalized for life or until he was 'cured'? You may disagree, but I and the preponderance of progressive judicial legislation over the past two thousand years say a resounding NO.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#16)
    by Che's Lounge on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 08:22:43 AM EST
    Todd, Tell me this, Lavocat... If a man who was on parole for murder, no doubt that he done it, came to your home and proceeded to rob you - then finding you're at home, decided it's better off to have no witnesses kills your wife and children - God forbid - yet you survived.... Tell me, could you HONESTLY say that you would not want to see that man dead? You are advocating vigilantism. Get a clue.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#18)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 09:45:55 AM EST
    pigwiggle Please explain how ‘thou shalt not kill’ gets translated into ‘thou shalt only kill murdering rapists’. I'll give it a shot.... 'Thou shalt not kill' applies to this guy too. He chose to disreguad it, so we as a society need to make a choice, we can either let this guy run loose killing whoever he wants, or we can stop him. Unfortunately, when you are in prison & not on death row, you have several opportunities to get out. This guy did & he murdered 2 women while on parole for the previous murder conviction. So I say, not only should we fry him, but the one responsible for turning him loose should also get it. Then we can be sure he'll never kill again. Simple enough? 'Thou shalt not kill' is a good one, but there are others like " do unto others".... & ... "An eye for an eye"...etc. that we should follow also. If there was real 'true' justice, this guy would be raped & murdered just like he did to his victims.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#19)
    by pigwiggle on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 09:50:21 AM EST
    “'Thou shalt not kill' is a good one, but there are others like " do unto others".... & ... "An eye for an eye"...etc. that we should follow also.” Those others aren’t commandments, but rather nice sayings. I don’t understand how Christians can ignore Gods law; isn’t this and obvious contradiction?

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#20)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 09:51:49 AM EST
    Free rad.... What good does it do to kill him? The only way to make sure he never does it again. Plus, he's not breathing valuble air & sucking up tax money for another 30 years! To be perfectly honest, you're a bunch of malicious bastards if you want to kill someone just for the hell of it. It isn't just for the hell of it...it's called justice. You play by the rules or you suffer. It's very simple.

    Lavocat - I don't have anything to add to the discussion that hasn't already been said, but what does "lumpenprole" mean? I can't find a definition...

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#22)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 10:15:38 AM EST
    Personally, BB, I think you don't deserve to breathe the valuable air you suck up and are a waste of a good computer. Fortunately for you, however, I don't get to decide if you live or die. Neither evolution nor intelligent design theories seem to fully account for your regressive thinking. Perhaps I'll re-read Lord of the Flies to get some vision of life under the rock you crawled out of.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#23)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 10:23:04 AM EST
    The lumpen proletariat is us.

    Got it. Thanks.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#25)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 01:23:02 PM EST
    Lumpenproletariat From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The lumpenproletariat (German Lumpenproletariat, "rabble-proletariat") is a term used by Marxists to describe the section of the proletariat that can't find legal work on a regular basis. These may be prostitutes, beggars, or homeless people. LOL - Speak for your self, Lavocat. I am working towards becoming uberlumpenproletariat, or even regular proletariat one day!!!

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#26)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 03:20:11 PM EST
    You are advocating vigilantism.
    No, Che's Lounge, I was asking a question.
    Of course he/she would, blockhead. Ten thousand years ago Lavocat and her/his friends/relatives/neighbors would have formed a mob and beaten/stoned the person to death.
    I am not talking about ten thousand years ago; I am talking about NOW.
    Most importantly, we incorporated Christian and Western principles into a new kind of justice that reached beyond the Hammurabic 'eye for an eye'. We said that the punishment should fit the INTENT of the defendent rather than the end result of his actions. For example, if I ran a stop sign and killed a little boy, under eye for an eye, either me or my son should forfeit our lives. Under democratic justice, as I didn't INTEND to hurt anyone my punishment should befit someone guilty of gross negligence resulting in death, who should have known that the consequences of disobeying traffic laws can be fatal.
    I agree with you here, mfox. If a person murders another person, as in this case, a multiple-murder that apparently has no remorse for his actions then he should fry - his INTENT, as you put it, was obviously to KILL.
    However, old habits die hard. Certain crimes sound the call for blood and the real reason people are incarcerated - to protect the rest of us from them - is lost. To me, if someone is no longer a danger, there is no point in keeping them in jail (it costs me the taxpayer a lot of money!. With all due respect and sympathy to victims, the justice system isn't about justice for them, it's about justice for the accused.
    I agree. If they *appear* to no longer be a danger, perhaps they've learned their lesson, let them out. If they repeat the same crime then justice should dictate they have not learned their lesson and they should be put under the jail!
    Certainly some crimes are so horrific, affront us so much that we have a quite natural urge to repeal their right to even be a human - to live. However, much more often the death penalty is meted out to the killers of attractive, caucasian, soundbite friendly, high SES victims. To poorly defended, poorly raised, mentally challenged individuals whose lives may have no meaning to us or to the state. Don't forget, once the State claims the right to take lives, it also administers the line where life and death is drawn. Now I'm willing to give the Gov't. control over some tax money, but I just don't think they're up to the job of deciding life and death.
    This is very tricky area. Ultimately the judge is the one to sentence the criminal; however, there are several things weighed into account before a death sentence is issued - input from the jury, input from the family, and although, not officially, I would imagine public opinion weighs in on it as well. So, I do not see where the gov't has complete control over this.
    I hope all of you "stone throwers" will go back to review this story and see that Mr. Beardslee was not the primary purveyor of these murders and received a disproportionately severe sentence to those who were.
    "purveyor"??? He was selling the murders?
    Excerpt: They claimed Beardslee helped with the murder plot and sent his roommate to get duct tape to bind the victims before they even arrived at his apartment. (source)
    Sounds to me like he was purveying quite a bit - sending his roommate to get items to commit this horrid crime.
    You may disagree, but I and the preponderance of progressive judicial legislation over the past two thousand years say a resounding NO.
    I do disagree and the preponderance of progressive judicial legislation from where? History is complete with death sentences for particularly heinous crimes.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#27)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Wed Jan 19, 2005 at 06:17:02 PM EST
    Sheesh, I guess I'm on a different internal clock from the rest of you. Todd: No offense taken. The road I took was a long one and I have great patience for those still on it. I suspect that you will come 'round, after a while. The problem I have with your argument is this: you avoid meeting me on the rational plain and go right for the emotional jugular - only to perfectly prove my position. If U.S. public (penal) policy is to be decided on emotion, and the unfettered desire for vengeance, then we remain in the Middle Ages. I know, it was an argument I once thought I had honed to perfection. And, I'll give you this: I FIRMLY believe in the constitutionality of capital punishment - always have, always will. A state CLEARLY has the right to protect its citizens from its citizens, to the point of killing them, IF (very big if here) it can do so in such a way that guarantees a truly fair trial to the accused. But THAT is just the point, it's a conundrum and virtually impossible to achieve. It's like communism: in theory it's a wonderful utopia; in practice it just doesn't work. The bottom line is that capital punishment is an atavism from the young republic. And we need to move on. Besides, forgoing capital punishment as a society has ENORMOUS symbolic value over the crazy-quilt pattern now in effect in the 50+ American jurisdictions. And symbols carry with them enormous power. If a nation says, no, we will NOT kill, it sets a great example and states something that needs to be constantly reiterated: all life is sacred - even the most irredeemable of lives. Also, from an intellectual point of view, I find capital punishment to be incredibly unimaginative. Haven't we evolved to the point where we can consider more create options than you-killed-him-so-we're-going-to-kill-you? After all this time, we can't come up with something less animalistic? mfox: what you said! Sarcastic unnamed one: while originally a German Marxist term, "lumpenprole", I meant it in its more post-modern generic form - essentially the modern ne'er-do-wells of common criminals, homeless, and those chronically "outside" the system. While it does carry a modern cachet of being heroin-chic or just post-grunge, I meant it more in the form of "unfortunate soul". To be a lumpenprole is to be forever pitied. Otherwise, mfox strikes again.

    Re: Schedule of Calif. Death Penalty Protests (none / 0) (#28)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Thu Jan 20, 2005 at 10:40:03 AM EST
    I just don't understand the death penalty... killing people to say that killing people is wrong?? It obivously isn't an efficient detterrant as people still commit murders. How is the state any better than the murders themselves when they carry out a planned, calculated murder, in cold blood, and allow people to watch? They are then the murderers. We do not have the right to kill people, no matter what the circumstances.