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Giuliani's Golfer Son Wants to Run for Mayor of New York

This is the funniest thing I've read all day. Andrew Giuliani, the golfing son of Rudy hired by Donald Trump in 2017 as an "assistant to the public liaison office" for which taxpayers shelled out $90k a year says he is seriously thinking of running for Mayor of New York:

“I am certainly thinking about it. It’s something that a bunch of people that I trust have approached me with,” the younger Giuliani told The Post. “It’s been terrible to see over the last few years how the city has spiraled. I am afraid if the right candidate doesn’t win in 2021, four more years of de Blasio’s policies will remind us of the 80s.”

I guess Don Jr., who once was toying with running for mayor, has now passed the post on to Andrew. Don, Jr. probably thinks the job isn't good enough for him, he'd make a better governor or Senator. (I doubt he'll run for Congress, it's too much work to have to reapply to your constituents every 2 years.) [More...]

What exactly were his duties as a "public liaison assistant "? According to the Atlantic:

The public-liaison office deals with outreach to outside coalitions, and several of the current and former administration officials I spoke to for this story said Giuliani helps arrange sports teams’ visits to the White House.

...Others who have worked with Giuliani offered a different take on his White House tenure. “He doesn’t really try to be involved in anything,” one former senior White House official told me, speaking on the condition of anonymity in order to be candid. “He’s just having a nice time.”

... A second former senior White House official plainly called it “a nepotism job.”

He also was described as Donald Trump's traveling golf buddy:

And as the person with one of the better golf handicaps in Trump’s inner circle, Giuliani sometimes traveled with the president for the sole purpose of joining him for a round or two.

Andrew made the news again when the media learned he had an out-sized west-wing clearance pass for his role and former Chief of Staff John Kelley revoked it and Rudy went nuts:

Kelly revoked Andrew’s West Wing access, disrupting the staffer’s otherwise freewheeling setup. Giuliani “flipped out” about the downgrade, the third former official said. Four of the former officials said Giuliani’s father immediately spoke about it with Trump, who then ordered Kelly to restore Giuliani’s pass and promote him to special assistant to the president. “Kelly just wouldn’t,” the third former official said. “Trump would think it was done. Then it wasn’t … It was classic Kelly. Just ignore and assume Trump will forget.” Kelly, the source added, “said the staff reported to him, not Trump, so it was for him to decide.”

Later, Kelly's successor Mick Mulvaney restored Andrew's privileges.

In January, 2020, the Irish Times ran an article labeling him Donald Trump's Golf-Pro in Residence. It aptly described Andrew's public life beginning with his performance at his father's swearing-in as Mayor when he was just 7 years old:

Giuliani has been in the public eye since 1994 when, as a precocious seven-year-old, he stood next to his father while he made his inaugural address as mayor. As Rudy laid out his plans for cleaning up the city and remaking it as capital of the world, Andrew hammed it up on the podium beside him, blowing kisses to the cameras, mimicking his dad’s every hand gesture and even shouting out random declarations like, “It should be so and it will be so!”

And who will forget his lawsuit against Duke University when he got kicked off the team for behavioral issues, which was thrown out by two different judges: :

Having failed to impact on the course, he was thrown off the team in 2008 for breaches of discipline that included breaking clubs, disrespecting a trainer and throwing an apple at a teammate. At one point, five of the other Duke squad wrote a letter asking him not to come back. Giuliani reacted in a classically Trumpian way, suing the college for damaging his professional prospects and alleging he was persecuted in a manner akin to William Golding’s Lord of the Flies.

What experience does Andrew Giuliani have to support a mayoral run? None that I can see. Prior to working for the White House, his adult job record seems to consist of a short stint as an intern for an investment bank and working on Trump's 2016 campaign. He also was a a contestant on a reality TV golfing show. That's it.

One more thing. His former boss at the liaison office says he sometimes had spare time at the office so they sent him as their representative to attend some White House meetings on the opioid crisis. As the article opines:

Since the Trump administration is notorious for appointing people with no skill set or experience to crucial positions (witness failed newspaper publisher Jared Kushner charged with solving the Middle East crisis), having a failed golf pro at the table when discussing the most grave public health issue facing the nation totally adds up.

What will Andrew's platform be if he runs for Mayor? Law and Order and the 1980's method of policing. According to the New York Post cited above:

“It’s broken-windows policing, it’s empowering the NYPD to do their job, it’s bringing the private sector in and making them more accountable for creating economic opportunity, it’s reintroducing the free market to some of these low income communities in New York City that have been stuck on the cycle of government dependency for so long,” he said. “The nucleus of all of it is public safety. It’s making sure that New Yorkers feel safe and that tourists feel safe coming here.”

He even admits he's taking everything from his father's old playbook. According to the Post, he says even if he doesn't run,

...he could only support a candidate who followed what he called the “Giuliani playbook” of governing the city.

Shorter version: He doesn't have an original thought in his head. He's just swallowed his father's kool-aid.

Can someone please tell Andrew that his father didn't invent "broken-windows policing"? It was his police commissioner, Bill Bratton's creation. (And what New Yorker today would support putting poor mostly minority people in jail for "quality of life" crimes like New York did back then? Would New Yorkers today really approve of jailing the guys who jumped on your car at traffic lights with their squeegees to clean your windshield? I doubt it.)

Another thing: Rudy is now 80. Judging from his unhinged TV appearances over the last few years, his mental faculties seem to be in decline. If Andrew runs and wins, will Rudy make it through a four year term? If not, where will Andrew get his cue cards and cliff notes?

Like I said, funniest article of the day. Run, Andrew Run - it will be a slam dunk for your Democratic opponent.

P.S. Does anyone know who came up with the line that Andrew Giuliani and Eric Trump look like they shared the same milkman? I read it somewhere tonight but there was no attribution.

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  • Display: Sort:
    speaking of unqualified, entitled offspring (5.00 / 2) (#4)
    by Peter G on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 09:28:32 AM EST
    If Joe Lieberman's son would drop out of the Georgia senatorial primary, we might be in a position to pick up a Democratic senator there.

    I had no (none / 0) (#5)
    by Ga6thDem on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 12:42:38 PM EST
    idea he was Joe's son. There have been calls for him to drop out but he has been refusing.

    Parent
    who are y'all talking about? (none / 0) (#17)
    by leap on Tue Sep 15, 2020 at 10:26:01 AM EST
    Joe Lieberman's "son"? Must be some sort of in-Georgia joke.

    Parent
    well he's no spring chicken (none / 0) (#19)
    by Jeralyn on Tue Sep 15, 2020 at 11:12:20 PM EST
    he's 52 which is not an age I associate with a child (or even offspring) and he is running as a Democrat in a special election. Why do people think he should drop out? He's lived in Georgia since 2005.

    Parent
    Because it's (5.00 / 1) (#21)
    by Ga6thDem on Wed Sep 16, 2020 at 02:40:33 PM EST
    a jungle primary and Lieberman is splitting the D vote with Warnock. So the vote splitting between Warnock and Lieberman may lead to the runoff being Loeffler vs. Collins.

    Parent
    A few reasons are (5.00 / 1) (#22)
    by Peter G on Wed Sep 16, 2020 at 02:52:00 PM EST
    that he has no political or governmental experience, state or federal, or even experience in public service of any kind, is relying on his (awful) father as a "consigliere," and is running against (in effect) the African American pastor of M.L.K.'s old church, Raphael Warnock.

    Parent
    Yes, (none / 0) (#23)
    by Ga6thDem on Wed Sep 16, 2020 at 05:29:02 PM EST
    but Ossoff also could be described in the same terms as Lieberman.

    Parent
    Please Explain Milkman Joke (3.00 / 1) (#1)
    by RickyJim on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 08:55:58 AM EST
    I suppose that not having the foggiest idea what the joke is means I am totally unwoke or something like that.

    you need to look at the photos (none / 0) (#2)
    by leap on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 09:08:14 AM EST
    of Baby Giuliani and Ewick Trump. They obviously have the same father. Horse-toothed grin. Combed-back greasy light-brown hair. Squinty, dull snake-eyes. Pasty-white ambience.

    Parent
    Was (none / 0) (#8)
    by Zorba on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 01:24:00 PM EST
    Gary Busey the father of both of them?  Inquiring minds want to know.

    Parent
    was he the milkman? (5.00 / 1) (#15)
    by leap on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 10:20:23 PM EST
    n/t

    Parent
    Once upon a time (none / 0) (#3)
    by Chuck0 on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 09:24:00 AM EST
    milk was delivered to people's homes.

    Parent
    My dad was Italian, my mom was Irish. (none / 0) (#6)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 12:51:36 PM EST
    We had a daily milk delivery for most of my childhood.

    I have three dark-haired, deeply tanning, brothers. I am a freckled redhead.

    Just imagine the creative and hilarious jokes. They almost write themselves.

    Parent

    Finally, I Get It (none / 0) (#7)
    by RickyJim on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 01:09:47 PM EST
    Thanks to all of you.  Wikipedia thinks the he joke dates to the early 20th century but doesn't pinpoint the first occurance.

    Parent
    I took it like (none / 0) (#9)
    by Jeralyn on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 02:05:37 PM EST
    they are both as white as mayonnaise, and so is milk.

    Parent
    Well, it's heartening to see that (5.00 / 2) (#10)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 02:40:48 PM EST
    the milkman "joke" is losing its relevance as the years go by...

    Parent
    We didn't have daily milk delivery (none / 0) (#11)
    by CST on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 03:15:27 PM EST
    One of my sisters is dark-haired, deeply tanning and everyone else (especially on my father's side) is more of a freckled redhead.

    We still had milkman jokes.

    Parent

    My sister, 13 months younger than me, (5.00 / 1) (#16)
    by Peter G on Tue Sep 15, 2020 at 08:32:33 AM EST
    is/was short, round, and blond. I am/was tall, thin, and dark. We used to tell people we were "identical twins."

    Parent
    My middle sister (none / 0) (#20)
    by CST on Wed Sep 16, 2020 at 02:22:50 PM EST
    (the milkman one) is also about 5 inches shorter than me and not quite two years older.  Growing up we were the same height from the time I was 2 years old.  I loved telling people we were twins.  She did not love that.

    Parent
    So witty, amirite?! (none / 0) (#12)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 04:06:53 PM EST
    Especially when said to the parents at like every Sunday mass for a decade or so.

    Sidesplitting.

    Parent

    I'm sorry to hear that. (5.00 / 1) (#13)
    by Ga6thDem on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 05:50:18 PM EST
    People can be so obnoxious.

    Parent
    Thanks GA. (none / 0) (#14)
    by sarcastic unnamed one on Mon Sep 14, 2020 at 07:15:51 PM EST
    Very kind of you.

    I haven't heard this "quip" for many years now, it kind of brought up some old memories! :-)

    Parent

    I honestly never heard it (none / 0) (#18)
    by Jeralyn on Tue Sep 15, 2020 at 11:06:46 PM EST
    before this, and I did have a milkman for my son from the time he went off Similac until he left for college.  For those who don't know what Similac is, I just googled it and was surprised they are still around.

    Parent
    And now, introducing the face of (none / 0) (#24)
    by Peter G on Wed Sep 16, 2020 at 06:56:08 PM EST
    the Republican Party of Delaware: Look who won their primary.

    Didn't the Delaware Republicans (5.00 / 1) (#25)
    by desertswine on Wed Sep 16, 2020 at 10:13:27 PM EST
    run an actual witch for the Senate a few years ago?

    Parent
    More (none / 0) (#26)
    by FlJoe on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 05:04:24 AM EST
    proof that the inmates are running the asylum, she won by a mile over the GOP endorsed candidate.

    The lunatic fringe has truly taken over the Republican party.

    Parent

    Unintended consequences (none / 0) (#27)
    by CaptHowdy on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 08:18:41 AM EST

    Trump faces a different challenge: Not only is he behind, but a slice of his potential supporters are iffy about voting, the poll finds. At the same time, the main issue he has pushed in recent weeks -- law and order -- appears to have salience mostly with people who already strongly support him.

    Registered voters who solidly back Trump and those who solidly back Biden report a similar likelihood of voting, about 95% on average. The president's problem comes with those who say they only lean toward voting for him. They average a 75% likelihood, the poll finds, compared with 92% for those who lean to Biden.

    Those weak Trump supporters are also slightly more doubtful that their ballots will be counted -- a worry that the poll indicates may be discouraging their likelihood of voting. Trump's warnings about rigged elections and vote fraud, which have been replete with false statements, may have heightened those concerns, unintentionally deterring some of his supporters.

    yahoo

    Dan Coats Op-Ed (none / 0) (#28)
    by CaptHowdy on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 08:22:19 AM EST
    The Trump campaign (none / 0) (#29)
    by KeysDan on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 11:22:07 AM EST
    appears to have given up on getting more votes in favor of stealing them--- and discrediting those cast as rigged.  And, Barr, who has gone "full Caputo", is paving the way for election protesters to be dealt with as seditious.

    Parent
    I'll say it again (5.00 / 1) (#30)
    by CaptHowdy on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 11:50:08 AM EST
    They have had this planned for years and I really really think that WITHOUT the virus it would have worked.

    Parent
    Barr seems to be (none / 0) (#31)
    by KeysDan on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 12:29:57 PM EST
    having trouble keeping the DOJ career attorneys on board for his election project. Barr is not a kidder, or a laugh-a-minute type guy, so we know to take him seriously as we would  with any snake's death rattle.

    However, he seems particularly distraught over the largely peaceful protests around the nation despite Trump's best efforts to make them otherwise so as to put into effect their law and order scheme. The big old Republican playbook is not only out-of-date, but also, no match for the virus.

    Parent

    Yes that (none / 0) (#32)
    by CaptHowdy on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 12:51:30 PM EST
    The protests really rub his rhubarb.  I think not just the general idea of civic action but even more the way they are being seen in a positive light by a majority of voters.  

    I am feeling a bit less panic.  Not much but it really seems to be slipping away for them.

    After the announcement of Bloomberg going to FL they had a little dog and pony show about how he didn't have to win FL to win.  Which seems to me to be mostly justification for them not giving up when they lose FL.

    Also that OpEd by Dan Coats is very very good.  Real people - Republican people - are starting to sound the alarm.

    I'm feeling better.

    Look on the bright side.  Trump could already have Covid

    Parent

    Law `n order no more (none / 0) (#33)
    by CaptHowdy on Thu Sep 17, 2020 at 01:40:21 PM EST