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100 Greatest Films

According to Cahiers du Cinema compilation. (Via Ann Althouse.)

Everyone has their own list of course, but it is hard for me to imagine that nothing from Roman Polanski made the list ("Chinatown" is my favorite film, but "Repulsion" should satisfy the art house insistent.) Plus, "Touch of Evil" makes the list? The other thing is "Once Upon A Time In America" over "Once Upon a Time In the West?" Not buying that one.

This is an Open Thread.

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    Just off the bat (5.00 / 1) (#4)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:33:38 PM EST
    any such list that doesn't have Casablanca and Lawrence of Arabia in the top 10, let alone at all, lacks credibility IMHO.

    I haven't seen all of the films on this list, but with omissions like that, and Singin' in the Rain there (which I just barely enjoyed, though it's clearly an important film), I really have to wonder.

    Though I will give them some credit (none / 0) (#6)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:34:54 PM EST
    for picking Vertigo instead of Rear Window. The latter is more enjoyable, but the former is a masterpiece.

    Parent
    I thought Rope was better (5.00 / 1) (#16)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:41:58 PM EST
    But that's just me.

    Parent
    I don't much like Rope (none / 0) (#27)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:45:41 PM EST
    As a historian, I shouldn't dive headfirst into presentism, but the archaic gay subtext ruins the whole thing for me. It's insulting.

    Parent
    I like that it had virtually no editing. (none / 0) (#78)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:17:12 PM EST
    They just changed the film can once too.

    Parent
    Made doubly difficult (none / 0) (#95)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:26:51 PM EST
    by the fact that they shot it in 3D. It was made just during the changeover to Eastmancolor, so I think it's an early example of that.

    Parent
    Not shot in 3D. (none / 0) (#199)
    by Vico on Fri Nov 28, 2008 at 12:20:01 AM EST
    Dial M for Murder was, though.

    Parent
    Duh! (none / 0) (#203)
    by andgarden on Fri Nov 28, 2008 at 08:03:15 AM EST
    Rope wouldn't make sense in 3d, anyway. No point.

    Parent
    Great movie. (none / 0) (#132)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:07:51 PM EST
    Flawed experiment (none / 0) (#145)
    by brodie on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:30:35 PM EST
    in filmmaking, but interesting to watch nonetheless.  I think the film had to be changed every 15 min or so.  Not in the Top 100 though.

    Hitch's best were Psycho, NxNW, Notorious and the very underrated The Birds.

    Parent

    Vertigo is better than The Birds IMO (none / 0) (#149)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:36:36 PM EST
    but NxNW is one of my favorite movies of all time.

    Parent
    No Grace Kelly? (none / 0) (#18)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:43:14 PM EST
    Not very loyal to Philly, are you?

    Parent
    heh (none / 0) (#33)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:47:39 PM EST
    To Catch a Thief would have been a good choice.

    Parent
    You should read down the post (none / 0) (#10)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:37:45 PM EST
    The omission of David Lean's masterwork is jarring. It's a better film than scarface surely?

    Parent
    In fairness, they've got the original Scarface, (none / 0) (#14)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:41:13 PM EST
    which I've never seen in its entirety. But I'd have expected them to at least pick Public Enemy.

    Parent
    Definitely jarring (none / 0) (#17)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:42:34 PM EST
    Remember - this list was (5.00 / 2) (#31)
    by scribe on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:46:58 PM EST
    put together by some French folks, so there is going to be some difference in the tastes expressed.  I was a little surprised they didn't include something with Jerry Lewis in it.

    Frankly, I would have given the nod to Godfather II, as opposed to The Godfather.

    But, like all "best" lists, there's a lot of room for disputation.

    Parent

    Would have been great (5.00 / 1) (#34)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:48:11 PM EST
    if "The Nutty Professor" was on the list.

    Parent
    how original of you. (none / 0) (#76)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:16:02 PM EST
    That was the first thing that occurred to me.

    Parent
    Buddy Love (none / 0) (#83)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:20:42 PM EST
    the thing that makes "The Nutty Professor" great is that Lewis was just doing method - he was Buddy Love.

    And proved it every Labor Day for a lot of years.

    Parent

    I used to think Lewis and Martin (none / 0) (#133)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:08:54 PM EST
    were terrifically funny.  Wonder if that remains true.

    Parent
    Godfather (5.00 / 1) (#156)
    by brodie on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:50:53 PM EST
    was close to a perfect film, and was fresh and the perceived realism of the Mafia and their violence was shocking for the time.  A Top Ten Alltime Film absolutely.

    Godfather Deux was outstanding, particularly the scenes in Havana, but coming second it didn't have the same surprise element for moviegoers -- we knew there'd be violence and plenty of it.  Not as perfectly made as G the First, in at least one important techinical sense, yet still about 95% perfection.  

    G-2 belongs in the Top 25.

    Parent

    Polanski (none / 0) (#185)
    by cal1942 on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 11:08:25 PM EST
    Not a direct reply but leaving out Chinatown was a disgrace and The Pianist ain't beanbag either.

    Parent
    Lean's best work was (none / 0) (#146)
    by brodie on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:33:03 PM EST
    Bridge on the River Kwai, not on this badly flawed and slightly pretentious Cahiers list.

    Larry of Arabia a close second.

    Parent

    What I like about it is that it is (none / 0) (#68)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:11:15 PM EST
    not a completely Hollywood-centric list.

    It is also worth mentioning that Jerry Lewis was at one time a hero to the French.

    It is a different perspective on the world - I like that. :)

    Parent

    Fla ban on gay adoption overturned (5.00 / 1) (#100)
    by Amiss on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:28:09 PM EST
    NY Times has it:

    LINK

    A Judge overturned the FL ban on Gay adoptions that has been in place now for 31 Years!!

    The Judge ruled that the ban was unconstitutional and that the "best interests of children are not preserved by prohibiting homosexual adoption."

    Judge Cindy Lederman stated that the law "violated equal protection rights for children and their prospective parents."

    How much has the court changed (5.00 / 1) (#103)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:30:28 PM EST
    since 2000?

    Lawton Chiles's people might agree, but probably not JEB's.

    Parent

    Here are some more (5.00 / 1) (#170)
    by Politalkix on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 08:07:15 PM EST
    Schindler's List (Steven Spielberg)
    The Last Emperor (Bernardo Bertolucci)
    Dr. Zhivago (David Lean)
    Judgement at Nuremberg (Stanley Kramer)
    The Bridges of Madison County (Clint Eastwood)

    Lean Derangement Syndrome (5.00 / 1) (#182)
    by cal1942 on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:56:25 PM EST
    I forgot about Dr. Zhivago.  The maker(s) of this list really have a bad case of LDS.  

    Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia AND Dr. Zhivago are easily among any best of all time list.

    Parent

    Wings of Desire (5.00 / 1) (#172)
    by ChrisO on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 08:49:17 PM EST
    I'm with oculus on that one. Great film. One of my three favorites, none of which made the list. Badlands is my all time favorite film (really, Netflix it if it looks like something you'd like) followed by Shawshank Redemption and Wings of Desire. Although I guess Godfather has to fit in there somewhere.

    And it will never make a list like this, but I think Raising Arizona is the best comedy ever.

    Berlin Alexanderplatz (none / 0) (#186)
    by squeaky on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 12:05:56 AM EST
    Is nothing to sneeze at either.

    Parent
    I'll raise you "Lives of Others" (none / 0) (#187)
    by oculus on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 12:24:26 AM EST
    MacMurray also played a great cad (5.00 / 1) (#202)
    by Vico on Fri Nov 28, 2008 at 01:00:40 AM EST
    in Wilder's The Apartment, a Best Picture Oscar winner that almost no one watches anymore.

    I'm surprised the Deer Hunter... (none / 0) (#1)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:30:56 PM EST
    ...didn't make it.  Or maybe  missed that one.  

    I missed it. (none / 0) (#2)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:32:05 PM EST
    lol

    Parent
    number 35 (none / 0) (#23)
    by scribe on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:44:06 PM EST
    interesting list

    Parent
    I didn't see Deer Hunter until maybe (none / 0) (#35)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:48:28 PM EST
    three years ago.  Not all that interesting, which surprised me given all the hype when it first showed.

    Parent
    Deer Hunter belongs with "100 Worst" (5.00 / 1) (#55)
    by Jacob Freeze on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:00:48 PM EST
    I saw that thing in a revival house with an audience of jingo squareheads on the 4th of July, and laughed all the way through it.

    After the movie, they immediately formed a circular firing squad around me, and all I had to do was duck.

    [Editor's note: This comment is a metaphor.]  

    Parent

    Coincidentally I tried to watch it the other day (5.00 / 1) (#190)
    by ruffian on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 06:24:54 AM EST
    because I remembered liking it at the time, and wanted to see the young DeNiro, Streep, and Walken again.  But I couldn't even make it through the wedding reception.

    Walken however was even better than I remembered.  I'm sorry his career got channelled into charmingly villainous roles instead of more just plain charming.  That's just me.

    Parent

    The only thing I liked about the movie (none / 0) (#62)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:08:33 PM EST
    was seeing Meryl Streep in one of her first movie roles.  

    Parent
    You weren't young (none / 0) (#173)
    by oldpro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 08:52:31 PM EST
    in the 60s, were you?

    I think it was a truly remarkable movie with very fine performances exploring the complex relationships of friendship and love in the crucible of the violent mindaltering venom that was Vietnam.

    Parent

    I was. But I didn't see it then. (5.00 / 1) (#175)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 09:06:25 PM EST
    Deer Hunter was a (none / 0) (#183)
    by cal1942 on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:59:55 PM EST
    very good movie but it depressed me for a week.  

    It's been on cable several times recently but I won't watch it again. Once was enough.

    Parent

    Simply Bogus (none / 0) (#5)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:34:14 PM EST
    Without Chinatown, Repulsion, or Touch of Evil.

    Forget it Jake ;-) (5.00 / 1) (#7)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:35:22 PM EST
    My Siamese is named Jake Gittes (5.00 / 1) (#110)
    by Molly Bloom on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:34:28 PM EST
    Chinatown was released the same year as the Godfather. It just doesn't get the respect it deserves.

    No Bogart? No Maltese Falcon, no High Sierra or The Petrified Forest?  Not to mention Casablanca, the Big Sleep, Key Largo and To Have and Have Not.

    Parent

    Too lazy to look it up, (none / 0) (#151)
    by brodie on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:40:41 PM EST
    but I'm almost certain Godfather came out in 72, and Chinatown was in 74.

    Check on the Bogie flicks.

    Casablanca the best, then To Have and Have Not, and Largo.  The Big Sleep had a confusing plot and a lot of characters but not much of a human touch.  Something of a cold film, for cinéastes more than for the general public.

    Citizen Kane, a perennial #1 with the sophisticated critics but not with the jus' plain movie-loving folks chez Brodie, is another Cahiers-type film which leaves me cold.

    Parent

    We have similar movie tastes (none / 0) (#154)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:43:34 PM EST
    I didn't much enjoy CK. But Casablanca absolutely is in the top ten, if not the top five, if not at the very top.

    Parent
    Chinatown was released June 20, 1974 (none / 0) (#159)
    by Molly Bloom on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:03:46 PM EST
    Per IMDB Chinatown was released  June 20, 1974;  Godfather Part II was released in 1974 as well.

    Both were nominated for  1945 Academy Awards.  Chinatown won best original screenplay  a category which it did not compete in with Godfather Part II (Best Writing, Screenplay Adapted From Other Material)

    If you will kindly over look my faux pas as to which Godfather, my point is otherwise correct.

    Parent

    That should be 1975 (none / 0) (#161)
    by Molly Bloom on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:04:29 PM EST
    the 4 is underneath the 7 on the number pad

    Parent
    Oh, if you meant G-2 coming out in 1974 ... (none / 0) (#165)
    by brodie on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:27:09 PM EST
    Usually the US-based lists of Alltimers gives Chinatown its due, and it's all the more of a surprise, this slight from the Cahiers crowd, since Polanski is Euro and, these days, against his will, a Paris-based director.

    Something of a puzzler.

    But then, I don't see Wilder's masterpiece Double Indemnity noted by Cahiers either.

    Both Chinatown and Double Indem are Top Ten movies, and at worst Top 25.  

    Parent

    Touch of Evil? (none / 0) (#8)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:36:21 PM EST
    C'mon.

    Fun but 100 Greatest?

    Parent

    The multiple entries... (5.00 / 1) (#13)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:40:55 PM EST
    ...by individual auteurs suggests the surveyed group  was really saying they liked the work of xyz directors.  I'm not sure Chaplin needed more than one entry.  

    Parent
    The Auteur Theory (none / 0) (#22)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:44:05 PM EST
    in action.

    Parent
    Strong preference for French (none / 0) (#24)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:45:23 PM EST
    films on this list.  Gee, I wonder who was on the panel?

    Parent
    Some British Sympathies, however, (none / 0) (#58)
    by KeysDan on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:04:03 PM EST
    since they include "Bicycle Thieves", the Brit title. In the US. it was "The Bicycle Thief".  

    Parent
    They might as well have included (none / 0) (#36)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:48:47 PM EST
    One Of The (none / 0) (#20)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:43:58 PM EST
    Greatest opening scenes in all film of all time, imo. Also only one Kurosowa film. And not L'age d'or. just one Bunuel. No Warhol/Morrisey films.

    Also I agree Once a time in the west is much better than Once a time in America.  I can hear the jew's harp as I type.

    Parent

    Sure (none / 0) (#25)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:45:30 PM EST
    The problem is Heston is in the rest of the film.

    He ruins it. What a terrible performance.

    And I loved Heston in Planet of The Apes and Soylent Green. Seriously.

    Parent

    Disagree (none / 0) (#41)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:50:50 PM EST
    I thought he was perfect. For me the whole film was perfect.

    My game leg...  The sound innovations and the ending. I could watch it over and over and not get bored.

    Parent

    Marlene Dietrich (none / 0) (#47)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:55:34 PM EST
    was perfect.

    A lot of the rest of the film was not.

    Parent

    OMG (none / 0) (#150)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:39:55 PM EST
    She was great. Also in Josef von Sternberg's, The Blue Angel. Another great film..

    Parent
    Biting (none / 0) (#153)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:42:39 PM EST
    Quinlan: Come on, read my future for me.
    Tanya: You haven't got any.
    Quinlan: What do you mean?
    Tanya: Your future is all used up.

    Parent
    I'm not saying (none / 0) (#46)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:54:57 PM EST
    Heston is the best actor ever, but of all the careers to have in Hollywood, his must've been one of the coolest.

    He played religious manliness, roman manliness, caveman manliness, future manliness...

    Parent

    and spaceman er manliness. (none / 0) (#64)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:09:11 PM EST
    so much manliness (none / 0) (#77)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:16:39 PM EST
    so little time.

    Parent
    Could that be (none / 0) (#71)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:12:27 PM EST
    because he was manly?

    ;-)

    Parent

    It is shocking (5.00 / 2) (#81)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:19:14 PM EST
    that Heston never made an Old Spice commercial.

    Parent
    I think he did a Burma Shave (none / 0) (#179)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:47:50 PM EST
    Damn right Touch of Evil should be on the list. (none / 0) (#200)
    by Vico on Fri Nov 28, 2008 at 12:26:31 AM EST
    It's one of the great American films on the subject of America, and the French obsession with the idea of America, its contradictions, ambiguities and anomalies, no doubt helped it to its high position on the CdC list. To my mind, it's Welles' best film, considerably better than Kane, and a bit better than The Magnificent Ambersons.

    Parent
    I'm surprised (none / 0) (#12)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:39:22 PM EST
    there aren't other Bergman films on the list.

    And two Tati movies?  That is too much.  Playtime is really entertaining though.  I prefer Mon Oncle.

    Parent

    Well (none / 0) (#40)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:50:20 PM EST
    they had to include the entire Fellini filmography . . .

    Parent
    Yes, more Bergman films (none / 0) (#60)
    by KeysDan on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:06:26 PM EST
    especially if you enjoy themes of man, woman, bed and the sea.

    Parent
    Dark parsonages, angst, (none / 0) (#135)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:11:40 PM EST
    etc.  

    Parent
    oh bugger. (none / 0) (#9)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:36:37 PM EST
    Do the Indians have competent special forces chaps to deal with such a large hostage situation?

    what is their history in such situations?  Russian-like or more the French, British and Germans?

    So many hostages so many.

    What worries me... (none / 0) (#28)
    by MileHi Hawkeye on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:46:13 PM EST
    ...is somehow Pakistan is blamed for this and the nukes start flying.  Or W, in a last minute attempt to salvage his "legacy", decides to bomb India.  

    It doesn't appear that the Indian police/military response to this has been very good up to now.  

    Parent

    In AP article, police sd. they are inside (none / 0) (#38)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:50:02 PM EST
    their station and still being fired on.  Speculation in that article the violene was caused by Muslims who are getting payback for various attrocities visited on Muslims at revered sites on holy days.  

    Parent
    Good grief (none / 0) (#61)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:08:31 PM EST
    I see your BDS is in full bloom.

    Parent
    And a Happy Thanksgiving to you! (none / 0) (#164)
    by MileHi Hawkeye on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:26:16 PM EST
    In the spirit of the Holiday, I've decided to give you a break and not pwn you like Dark Avenger did the other day.

    You're welcome.

    Parent

    Save your fellowship for DA (none / 0) (#177)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:43:28 PM EST
    I can exist quite nicely without it.

    From him or you.

    Of course you aren't the ankle biter that he is.

    Parent

    You mischacterization of (none / 0) (#197)
    by jimakaPPJ on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 07:35:08 PM EST
    my remarks re the 2006 elections are typical of your standard mode of operation.

    But you know that because about I have reminded you of it at least six times... mostly I just choose to ignore you..

    And if you have something you want to bring forward, please make sure you bring the whole thread...

    DA, I basically just don't like you and would be happy to never use any bandwidth responding to you. That you continue to be the aggressor indicates a sick personality.

    I urge you to get help.

    Parent

    300,000 milion muslims (none / 0) (#73)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:14:35 PM EST
    in India too blame instead.

    Parent
    Once Upon a Time in the West (none / 0) (#11)
    by msaroff on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:37:47 PM EST
    God, that was Awful!!!

    I will admit that Sergio Leone helped me understand the American western, but showing me what it wasn't, and in a very real way, Clint Eastwood's path to "The Unforgiven," started with his Spaghetti Western days, but while some of his earlier movies were entertaining, in an Italian Grotesque sort of way, this was interminable.

    Wow! (none / 0) (#15)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:41:26 PM EST
    "Once Upon A time In The West" is genius. Pure genius.

    BTW, we upped our blog analyzer quotient today . . .

    Parent

    Sergio Leone (none / 0) (#106)
    by samtaylor2 on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:32:12 PM EST
    Both Once Upon a time in the the West and America (the original version) are masterpieces.

    Parent
    No "Ran"? (none / 0) (#19)
    by The Poster Formerly Known as cookiebear on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:43:51 PM EST
    Bah. Although I do like all the Fellino and Apocalypse Now and a few others.

    But the absence of Ran is criminal.

    Speaking of which, I'm sorry but Hitchcock is boring. I like all the ferris wheel and carnival stuff in some of his films, but I can barely stand more than five minutes of him without having to go fix myself a snack then make all those phone calls I've needed to make for the past three months.

    Ran is a really cool movie (5.00 / 2) (#26)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:45:37 PM EST
    love the fool on the hill and all the great battle scenes.

    Parent
    and never tire of it. I see something new in it every single time.

    Parent
    if you like foreign films (5.00 / 1) (#39)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:50:17 PM EST
    with buckets of blood in them, I suggest El Topo.  That movie is a trip.  

    Parent
    eg, Bunuel's Exterminating Angel. omg! The. Best! omg!!!

    I'm not wild about the blood in Ran, but god, it's such a trip and so, so beautiful. Just an amazing piece of work.

    Parent

    El Topo is pretty trippy (none / 0) (#65)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:09:30 PM EST
    the main character goes from being a widower to an avenging cowboy to a Christ figure to a Buddha figure.  The rest of the characters are similarly interesting.  Don't want to spoil you though :P  It is a really cool movie.  

    I don't think Talk to Her deserves to be on that list myself..

    Parent

    At least one of Almodovar's films (5.00 / 2) (#72)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:13:19 PM EST
    should make the list.  Maybe that first one distributed in the U.S.?  Banderas.

    Parent
    The first one to receive WIDE distribution (none / 0) (#74)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:15:33 PM EST
    was "Mujeres Al Borde De Un Ataque de Nervios" - but  he has made alot of good ones so that one would not make the list anyway - too popular.

    Parent
    I believe his best films (none / 0) (#201)
    by Vico on Fri Nov 28, 2008 at 12:36:04 AM EST
    are Law of Desire (or, as you would have it, La Ley del deseo) and Matador. Both much better than Women on the Verge. Of his more recent ones, Talk to Her (Hable con ella) seems to get better, more profound and more human-embracing every time I see it. Live Flesh is excellent, too.

    Parent
    It Did (none / 0) (#80)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:19:07 PM EST
    Talk To Her

    Parent
    I like Volver (none / 0) (#86)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:22:21 PM EST
    All About My Mother...I dunno maybe I should watch Talk to Her again.  

    Parent
    I Liked Talk To Her A Lot (none / 0) (#97)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:26:55 PM EST
    Although I liked all of them.


    Parent
    Remember the hue and cry (none / 0) (#112)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:34:51 PM EST
    when "Tie me up" opened in the U.S.?

    Parent
    Great One (none / 0) (#124)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:55:27 PM EST
    Did you see Woody Alleln's latest, (none / 0) (#122)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:44:58 PM EST
    VickyMariaBarcelona?  The more I think about it, the more I decide he was imitating Almodovar.

    Parent
    No But (none / 0) (#125)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:56:05 PM EST
    I heard it was great.

    Parent
    It is a good movie. (none / 0) (#126)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:02:32 PM EST
    With Barcelona as a bonus.

    Parent
    Why do people always pick The General? (none / 0) (#21)
    by tworivers on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:44:00 PM EST
    Buster Keaton has far better movies (like, for instance, The Navigator).

    Also, no Bringing Up Baby or His Girl Friday?  Is there a single screwball comedy on the list?

    I don't think I saw any Altman on there, either.

    Not a particularly impressive list, if you ask me

    Agree completely (none / 0) (#29)
    by The Poster Formerly Known as cookiebear on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:46:20 PM EST
    Bah!

    Parent
    Comedy never makes it onto these (none / 0) (#93)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:25:37 PM EST
    lists - it is an unwritten rule that comedic genius be excluded - and I agree that it would be great to see films like Bringing Up Baby and His Girl Friday on lists like this one - although as this is a French audience it is less likely that these dialogue-driven films would be fully appreciated by a majority of the group.

    Parent
    The Cahiers snobs (none / 0) (#157)
    by brodie on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:56:35 PM EST
    didn't include the absolute best screwball comedy of them all, My Man Godfrey.  

    Bringing Up Baby would be the second best.

    Parent

    Snobs? (none / 0) (#160)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:04:20 PM EST
    Did not seem like snobs to me, just French, and lacking.

    Parent
    Is Auntie Mame there? (none / 0) (#174)
    by oldpro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 09:00:16 PM EST
    Guess I'd better look.

    Parent
    Very discerning to include (none / 0) (#30)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:46:46 PM EST
    Sajarit Ray and Woody Allen.

    Annie Hall over Manhattan (5.00 / 1) (#37)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:49:33 PM EST
    imo.

    Parent
    They like Manhattan (none / 0) (#42)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:51:57 PM EST
    because Allen made the city look beautiful.

    Parent
    But it is a beautiful city. (none / 0) (#98)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:27:21 PM EST
    I couldn't bear to leave.

    Parent
    It had. . .issues (none / 0) (#102)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:29:11 PM EST
    And seriously (none / 0) (#43)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:53:28 PM EST
    Dr. No, From Russia With Love, Goldfinger. Pick one.

    And they were too self-conscious (none / 0) (#49)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:55:57 PM EST
    to pick The French Connection, apparently.

    Parent
    "An Affair to Remember" (none / 0) (#44)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:54:27 PM EST
    really hasn't stood the test of time.  I had forgotten Deborah Kerr sings!  

    Off the list... (none / 0) (#48)
    by Addison on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:55:49 PM EST
    Dr Strangelove
    12 Angry Men

    I think maybe these two films speak more to American audiences than others (esp. 12 Angry Men), though?

    But where's Monty Python and the Holy Grail?!


    African swallow? (5.00 / 1) (#51)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:56:53 PM EST
    Well, maybe... (5.00 / 2) (#53)
    by Addison on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:59:44 PM EST
    ...but not a European Swallow. That's my point.

    Parent
    Heh (none / 0) (#69)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:11:45 PM EST
    Dr. Strangelove would absolutely be on my list (none / 0) (#50)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:56:45 PM EST
    Plus "To Kill a (none / 0) (#52)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 04:58:28 PM EST
    Mockingbird."

    Also, where is "Wings of Desire"?

    Parent

    Ousmane Sembčne (none / 0) (#54)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:00:28 PM EST
    Xala, Black Girl etc

    I'm no fan of French films (none / 0) (#56)
    by nellre on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:03:05 PM EST
    There seem to be a lot in this list.
    But it's no wonder, it was put together by French film directors.
    My all time favorite is Alien... and pretty much everything Ridley Scott does.

    I love French films, but, unfortunately (none / 0) (#59)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:05:57 PM EST
    either they aren't being shown in the U.S. very much now or the French aren't making as many films.  That being sd., I'm seeing the new Deneuve today!

    Parent
    When I was overseas... (none / 0) (#63)
    by Addison on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:08:59 PM EST
    ...I saw "Irreversible" dubbed form French into Russian. It was absolutely horrifying. I didn't need to understand any of the words (though I understood some, of course) to never feel like watching it again.

    I'm still very unsure whether it was gratuitous or necessary as a film.

    Parent

    Top ten artp*rn (none / 0) (#70)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:12:19 PM EST
    Not in Order:

    Brown Bunny
    9songs
    Irreversible
    Baise Moi
    Salo
    Last Tango in Paris
    The Dreamers
    Kids
    ...
    ...

    anything else?


    Parent

    From Digby (none / 0) (#57)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:03:46 PM EST
    Am I the only one who finds it fairly offensive that the TV networks are obsessing about whether or not this Mumbai terrorist attack was really an attack against America?

    [snip]

    Not everything is about the United States.

    Update: I should be clear --- it certainly could have been targeted at Americans and be an attack "on Americans." But CNN is just frothing over the possibility when there's very little information to that effect at this point.

    digby


    That is always how the US media (5.00 / 1) (#121)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:42:45 PM EST
    covers foreign events - they are compulsive about finding the "American angle".  I used to listen to BBC World Service radio and the coverage was very different - it was about the people regardless of nationality.

    When Grenada was hit by hurricane Ivan and a bunch of us were trying to get the media to cover it, I called a producer at one of the US outlets and they told me that their "rule" was that there had to be a considerable number of Americans OR at least 3,000 dead for them to cover an international story.  There is a medical school there attended mostly by Americans, so there was a way to get them interested, but if there hadn't been one - they would have ignored the begining of what turned out to be a huge story in Ivan.

    There is a reason why we in the US are often totally surprised by explosive strife in foreign countries - we never hear about the stuff that leads up to the big events.

    Parent

    Except these particular terrorists (none / 0) (#130)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:06:44 PM EST
    were taking hostage only people w/U.S. or British passports.

    Parent
    Not true. (none / 0) (#139)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:21:57 PM EST
    They've also been attacking the Indian police.

    And I am responding to Digby's observations about the media's commentary which was very American-centric - even before anyone quite knew what was going on there.  I was pointing out that it is no different from the coverage of any other international story.  Remember the Tsunami in SE Asia?  Same thing.  "Big tidal waves.  Many people dead.  We are looking for Americans."  That's how we do it.  At the time, I was living overseas and watched both foreign reports and American reports.  By and large the foreign coverage simply covered the vast devastation and did no obsess on any particular victim because of nationality.  Our media, as I explained actually have a rule that there be an "American angle" or more than 3,000 dead.  So if you have 2,999 dead - you're SOL in the USA.

    Parent

    See NYT. BTD posted above. (none / 0) (#140)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:24:03 PM EST
    I totally phrased that improperly. (none / 0) (#147)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:35:38 PM EST
    It is true that Brits and Yanks were targeted, but what was not true was that that was immediately evident when the coverage started - there was a long time this afternoon where the media was reporting that with caveats - I saw the reporting that Digby was refering to.  There was - as there always seems to be - an excitement level about the possibility that an international incident is driven by Americans.  When I said, "Not True" I was trying to say that it is not true that they were the only targets and failed to note that there are some analysts who have suggested that targeting the Brits and Yanks might have been a diversionary tactic to get at the Indian officials who have been attacked and in some cases killed.  Sorry for being unclear.

    Parent
    You seem to be getting your info (none / 0) (#152)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:42:38 PM EST
    from TV.  I'm relying on print media.

    Parent
    I've been following both. n/t (none / 0) (#155)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:50:43 PM EST
    Reading the BBC accounts is (none / 0) (#158)
    by inclusiveheart on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:58:37 PM EST
    different.  No Americans or Brits mentioned in this linked article.  More perspective offered on the unique political situation in that part of the world.

    link

    The national elections are discussed - not American interests.

    The reality is that in some ways the US media rules end up endangering Americans overseas.  If the lunatics want an American audience they know they have to do something outrageous and that they have to target Americans.  That's the ugly truth about why American tourist hotels have such a long history of being targeted by these insane groups.

    Parent

    Hope she's correct. (none / 0) (#67)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:10:34 PM EST
    P.S.  Mailed my visa applic. yesterday.  Awwk.  

    Parent
    This is a good diary (none / 0) (#66)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:10:08 PM EST
    at daily kos - Link.

    Top of the Rec list at worthy. I am shocked.

    Yup... (5.00 / 2) (#85)
    by Addison on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:22:16 PM EST
    The contempt that I have heard at recent gatherings as people talk sarcastically of "Obama supporters" as mindless naifs is beyond disconcerting.  It strikes me as counterproductive to actual movement-building.

    ...especially was nostalgic for me. But back when I was planning the revolution it was Clinton and Gore in the role of Great Betrayer. Sometimes it seems like the far left needs betrayal like Republicans need persecution.

    Parent

    I am glad you wrote that (5.00 / 2) (#105)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:31:32 PM EST
    For some Clinton is still the Great Betrayer and that is what resonated with me.

    Parent
    Nice (5.00 / 1) (#120)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:40:39 PM EST
    Happy to have read it. A good reminder that joy is internal and important to nurture on a daily basis.

    Certainly the most attractive people I have ever met are full of it, joy that is.

    Parent

    Thank you for the point out (5.00 / 1) (#131)
    by Militarytracy on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:07:25 PM EST
    What a great share from someone who accomplishes tangible things every day and doesn't just ruminate about what they ruminated.  For me, this inauguration can't happen soon enough.  I feel exhausted.  I was told by a child days ago that when Barack Obama is President white people and Christians will start to be killed in this country.  Who teaches their children garbage like that?  I think it is starting to worry my son, maybe my reactions are, I don't know. When we were shopping for Thanksgiving yesterday he pointed to some tabloid with Obama's face on it where Obama looked like he was shouting and wanted to know what it was about.  I refused to read the headline.  I said, "Baby, I don't know but I'm so sick of people just losing their minds about our next President", and by God I said it loud enough for anyone remotely nearby to hear me clearly.  I'M TIRED OF IT!

    Parent
    Gosh (none / 0) (#134)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:11:10 PM EST
    Living in the south has its downside. Not sure that I could do it. ALthough, I am sure it is good for character training or spiritual development to have to put up with that level of nonsense on a daily basis.

    Parent
    It is very covert when it happens (none / 0) (#137)
    by Militarytracy on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:19:31 PM EST
    The kids at school did a vote.  My son took this very seriously.  Most of his friends were voting McCain, and he lives in a house where everything was discussed up one side and down the other.  He said he hadn't made up his mind for sure until election day. Josh chose Obama.  The child said this to us when their parent had walked away.  White people being killed was an "issue" I guess we missed in this house.  I didn't freak.  I told the kid I bet him he was wrong.  He said he bet me he was right and then we shook on it like kids do.  It hurt me though to hear that from a child's lips and of course I had to download to spouse because it is so heinous and frustrating and I'm tired of 'pretending I didn't hear that'.

    Parent
    Once (5.00 / 1) (#143)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:28:12 PM EST
    I stayed with an older couple in Atlanta for a weekend. An english friend of mine was a very distant relative, had never met them. We were traveling through the south and decided to look them up and stay a weekend,

    Really, the hospitality was unsurpassed. They were incredibly kind and super generous, considering that they did not know us from jack.

    It got really hard to take though because almost everything that they said was racist sexist or bigoted. The stream of crap that came out of their mouths was astounding. As long as they thought you were one of "them" they loved you, anyone else, forget it.

    The subtle stuff must be worse though, because it is very hard to tangle with, or explain to a child. Tough stuff.

    Parent

    I think our son though small notices the nuances (none / 0) (#166)
    by Militarytracy on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:29:06 PM EST
    better than I do. I have shades of racism in some of my older family members but with each generation it becomes more isolated and challenged.

    Parent
    You live in Alabama, right? (none / 0) (#142)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:27:19 PM EST
    It was one of (if not the) most racially polarized states on election day. Not a recent development. . .

    Parent
    If I point the racism out on blogs though (none / 0) (#167)
    by Militarytracy on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:39:39 PM EST
    often Southerners start screaming.  I was ticked when I got my son's school vacation schedule his first year of school here and MLK shares his birthday observance here with the observance of Robert E Lee.  The day is for both men here I'm told.  I scanned the schedule into the computer and posted it on DailyKos and Miss Laura ripped my butt off.  Said something to the tune that I had been searching high and low for some scrap of something from some back country hovel to screech racism at.  I didn't have to search very hard, just unzipped his backpack.  My son's grade school I believe has the top rating in the state too, didn't realize it was the school of some back country hovel.

    Parent
    Oy (5.00 / 1) (#168)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:49:46 PM EST
    People on blogs seem very defensive of the south (which isn't any person in particular, it's a mentality). But let's just put it this way: if voting in the rest of the country were as racially polarized as it is in the deep south, John McCain would have won in a landslide.

    Alabama and Maryland have about the same percentage black population +/-5. You do the math. . .

    Parent

    andn if the primary voting had not been (2.00 / 0) (#180)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:52:06 PM EST
    as polarized ....95%... for Obama, Hillary would be Pres.....

    Parent
    What's the primary got to do with anything? (none / 0) (#184)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 11:04:22 PM EST
    White voters in the south were an aberration this year, as they always are. The good news, but not for you, is that they have made themselves electorally irrelevant.

    Good riddance.

    Parent

    Surely you understand that (2.00 / 0) (#191)
    by jimakaPPJ on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 08:23:10 AM EST
    first you have to win the primaries to be nominated.

    As for your snarky racist remark, I'll tell our black Mayor, Aldermen, School Board members and Sheriff that all those white folks who voted for them didn't know they are black.

    Get your elitist mind into 2008 and try, if possible, to understand that the South votes on issues more than the North, East and far West. The population is more conservative and is more defense minded than the so-called "blue states." Obama failed on both points, as did Kerry and Gore before him.

    Our population is 35% black, 60% white with a 5% sprinkling of Asian and Hispanic. Blacks aren't one or three people you see in Lit 101 or that one couple a block over in the 'burb, but people we associate with and live with day in day out.

    Blacks have voted Democratic for years based on a belief that the Demos did more for "them." That, of course, is not factual but the results of a clever selling job. My hats off to the DNC.

    Blacks voted in the Demo primaries for Obama because of racial pride. That is perfectly understandable.

    Good riddance? Ha. You should be so fortunate to live here.

    Parent

    This "racist" "elitist" (none / 0) (#194)
    by andgarden on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 10:35:04 AM EST
    grew up in a city that was almost 50% black. There, racially polarized voting is very much an exception.

    You have a problem in the deep south, and it's not a new one. Don't project it on to me.


    Parent

    Your problem is that you (none / 0) (#195)
    by jimakaPPJ on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 07:28:34 PM EST
    like many people of the Left, still think "In the Heat of the Night" is a movie about current events.

    Plainer. You don't have a clue.

    Parent

    You're in denial (none / 0) (#196)
    by andgarden on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 07:32:11 PM EST
    if you think that the radicalized voting patterns I pointed to don't mean anything.

    Parent
    I am sorry if you feel (4.00 / 0) (#189)
    by Amiss on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 12:28:16 AM EST
    that some of us scream at you MT. But having been raised in the South and having lived all over the country, I see just as much racism elsewhere as I have in the South. You live in Columbus right? and Phenix City is right near there. My Mother was raised in Eufaula, about an hour away. Anyway, Phenix City is horrid, always has been and I imagine always will be. I think it has to do with HOW people are raised more than where they are raised whether it be n,s, e or west.

    I was raised in a Democratic home in the south, back then the Democrats dominated the South, believe it or not.

    Parent

    I pray that you folks gets a transfer (none / 0) (#181)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:53:13 PM EST
    Ft Lewis???

    Parent
    You reminded me (none / 0) (#136)
    by Fabian on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:16:19 PM EST
    I have a relative I might see tomorrow.  It'll be interesting to see what she has to say.  I'm not sure she has any original thoughts of her own, but she's great for repeating whatever she hears.  

    I pay more attention to what NPR and PBS say than anyone else.  They are the most resistant to bias, even though I've caught it creeping in.  Their coverage of Obama is cautious optimism.  Their coverage of economic and financial matters is cautious concern, emphasis on the concern.

    Parent

    Family (none / 0) (#141)
    by Militarytracy on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:26:49 PM EST
    Can't live with them, couldn't have got here without them.

    Parent
    Excellent, persuasive writer. (none / 0) (#94)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:25:49 PM EST
    But more than five paragraphs.

    Parent
    Indeed (none / 0) (#104)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:30:45 PM EST
    But necessary to explain her emotional journey.

    I would ask her this though - does she not see how it took a PERSONAL connection - Obama's election -to get her out of that thinking?

    I like to relate it to my exasperation with Clinton Hate.

    I think there is a real connection to what she writes about and what I have been trying to say about that.

    Parent

    I'm too busy excoriating (5.00 / 1) (#116)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:37:35 PM EST
    myself for continually complaining about Obama's FISA vote.  Get back to you.

    Parent
    She's a rebel.........yeah baby (none / 0) (#138)
    by Militarytracy on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:20:19 PM EST
    An interesting diary. (none / 0) (#169)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 08:01:37 PM EST
    I am sure Obama's presidency will reveal to us how far people are willing to go and how much people are willing to push for social change.  

    Hopefully the fact that Prop 8 and Obama happened at the same time will prove very fruitful.

    Parent

    No Fassbinder Either (none / 0) (#75)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:15:59 PM EST
    I think 100 is too limiting a number, although the village voice has a better top 100 than this one. IMDB has 250 which is more reasonable.

    500 is a better number (none / 0) (#79)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:18:12 PM EST
    I think.

    Duck Soup though, just seeing the title made me laugh.

    Love me some Marx Brothers.

    Parent

    Totally (none / 0) (#84)
    by lentinel on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:20:59 PM EST
    agreed.

    Parent
    Horse Feathers (none / 0) (#88)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:23:43 PM EST
    Is a funny title too. Professor Quincy Adams Wagstaff..

    hilarious.

    Parent

    Let' s not get started (none / 0) (#92)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:25:06 PM EST
    doing Groucho lines.

    We'll be here all night.

    Parent

    Just one (none / 0) (#101)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:28:36 PM EST
    cuz I love it so

    "You've got the brain of a four-year-old boy, and I'll bet he was glad to get rid of it."

    Parent

    Obama shot an elephant (none / 0) (#127)
    by Manuel on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:03:02 PM EST
    in his pajamas.

    Parent
    Huh? (none / 0) (#129)
    by squeaky on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:06:12 PM EST
    Didn't know that he made movies, nature movies no less.

    Parent
    How about... (none / 0) (#162)
    by lentinel on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:05:30 PM EST
    "Is there anything further, father?"

    Parent
    Freedonia! (none / 0) (#90)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:24:59 PM EST
    and no Pasolini (none / 0) (#91)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:24:59 PM EST
    No Gospel?

    Parent
    I mentioned Salo. . . (really, a disgusting movie) (none / 0) (#99)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:27:37 PM EST
    I refer you to slaughterhouse 5 (none / 0) (#108)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:33:47 PM EST
    Pasolini's Salo was actually an adaptation of De Sade's 120 Days. Which is a pastiche of the way society functions. I'm named after the Alien in Vonnegut's novel.

    is the spare part ready yet earthlings?

    Parent

    you know (none / 0) (#113)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:36:04 PM EST
    I always wondered if you had chosen the name after Pasolini's movie.  I thought, interesting guy!

    Parent
    should have asked (none / 0) (#118)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:40:07 PM EST
    I'm Tralfamadorian.

    Parent
    true (none / 0) (#109)
    by lilburro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:34:19 PM EST
    I have never seen that one but I'd like to.  The stills suggest you are correct!  Have you seen it?  Is it watchable?

    Parent
    If you hated irreversible (none / 0) (#115)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:37:11 PM EST
    you'll detest this one.

    It's an adaptation of De Sade's 120 Days. It's sickening but I tend to rate De Sade highly as an enlightenment era humorist and philosopher.

    Parent

    Soon you will be able to see (none / 0) (#117)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:39:10 PM EST
    De Sade's ruined castle restored (by Cardin).  

    Parent
    Don't plan to go to dinner afterwards (none / 0) (#123)
    by andgarden on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:51:24 PM EST
    Some of my favorite films (none / 0) (#82)
    by lentinel on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:19:55 PM EST
    will never make anybody's list...

    I have seen many of the films of the list presented above.
    I have no quarrel with any of them.

    But among my favorites that will never be listed are:

    Just about anything done by Laurel and Hardy.
    Just about anything done by W.C. Fields.
    Any of the Sherlock Holmes films featuring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce.
    "The Three Strangers" - featuring Peter Lorre and Sydney Greenstreet.
    "The Verdict" - also with Lorre and Greenstreet.

    Rathbone will always be (none / 0) (#87)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:22:42 PM EST
    the Sheriff of Nottingham to me.

    Parent
    No quarrel there. He is the sheriff. (none / 0) (#96)
    by lentinel on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:26:52 PM EST
    I'm just saying I can watch those Sherlock films over and over.

    To get a little heavy, I also think they are beautifully directed, and the supporting cast members are believable and memorable - even if they have only a few lines.

    Parent

    Laurel and Hardy... (none / 0) (#89)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:24:49 PM EST
    ...Gordo y Flaco.

    Parent
    Wait up (none / 0) (#107)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:32:24 PM EST
    Did you grow up in my house?

    Parent
    Many a day in the South West (none / 0) (#111)
    by Salo on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:34:37 PM EST
    I'm practically a Sonoran.

    Parent
    Ah (none / 0) (#114)
    by Big Tent Democrat on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:36:30 PM EST
    Likewise... (none / 0) (#148)
    by CoralGables on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:36:01 PM EST
    Having spent the better part of ten years seeing nothing but kid's movies...
    Two of my favorites that will never appear:

    The Princess Bride
    Milo & Otis

    Parent

    Back to the movies: (none / 0) (#119)
    by oculus on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 05:40:16 PM EST
    Bottlerocket.

    Interesting that "M" is in the top 10. (none / 0) (#128)
    by ThatOneVoter on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:03:39 PM EST
    I think it's  a fantastic film, but I didn't know it was so well-regarded.
    Peter Lorre is amazing in it.

    My favorite lists (none / 0) (#144)
    by Jeralyn on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 06:30:32 PM EST
    Right wing blogger Jeff Goldstein has terrific movie  lists. He's accumulated them all here. He does them by decade. His lists for the 70's are top notch.

    Another group of movies (none / 0) (#163)
    by lentinel on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 07:11:40 PM EST
    that are on nobody's list..

    are the ensemble films made in England featuring Peter Sellers, Ian Carmichael, Terry-Thomas and other great people like Alastair Sim and Wlifred Hyde-White.

    I'm Alright Jack
    Make Mine Mink
    Two Way Stretch
    Wrong Arm of the Law
    School for Scoundrels

    among others.

    57. The Seven Samurai - Akira Kurosawa (none / 0) (#171)
    by ding7777 on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 08:29:45 PM EST
    Good choice!

    Comparing The Seven Samurai w/John Sturges' The Magnificent Seven explains why The 7 Samurai made the list

    Inherit The Wind? (none / 0) (#176)
    by oldpro on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:13:43 PM EST
    Witness For the Prosecution
    Baghdad Cafe and Fargo and Raising Arizona?
    The Executioner's Song
    The Young Lions
    Guys and Dolls
    and a hundred others!

    Walkabout (none / 0) (#188)
    by oculus on Thu Nov 27, 2008 at 12:25:27 AM EST
    Bogus List (none / 0) (#178)
    by cal1942 on Wed Nov 26, 2008 at 10:43:39 PM EST
    Almost like they've deliberately left out some of the greatest films ever.

    No Casablanca, Lawrence of Arabia, Chinatown, Bridge on the River Kwai, Godfather 2.  And what's this Manhattan without Annie Hall?

    I guess I'm no real judge, I still haven't figured out Mulholland DR.

    Attempting rank movies ordinally is, IMHO, a foolish exercise.  Best a Hall of Fame list in no order and without deliberately shunning certain overachieving British and Polish directors.

    The authors of this list are dopes.