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Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Felonization of the Undocumented

Republicans and Democrats appear to have made some progress on an immigration reform bill. Republicans now seem ready to drop two provisions from Sensenbrenner's bill : the one that would have made it a felony to be in the U.S. without proper documentation and another that exposed humanitarian workers to criminal liability for aiding the undocumented. The latter provision read:

"whoever -- assists, encourages, directs or induces a person to reside in or remain in the United States (illegally) -- shall be punished ...."

But there is no promise by Republicans not to make undocumented presence a misdemeanor -- nor to drop the other punitive measures in Sensenbrenner's bill.

In related news, 21 immigrants were fired from their meat-packing jobs at Wolverine Packing in Detroit for attending a March 28 immigration rally in Detroit that drew 20,000 people. The company's response:

Employees had been notified orally and by letters posted in the plants that they would be fired if they missed work without authorization, the statement said.

"Many of these issues are near and dear to our hearts and can have serious effects on our lives, but Wolverine cannot allow these issues to stop our business," Mr. Bonahoom said. "When a large number of employees leave on a particular day, we cannot service our customers, and this puts all of our jobs in jeopardy."

More appropriate reactions by others:

"They were trying to exercise their right to protest, their right to have a voice," Ms. Castillo said. "I think we're going to see that this is just one incident of many civil rights violations that these workers have endured."

and

"There are two or three potential employees available for every one of these poor folks who were fired....It's better for everyone if there is a lawful protected class of workers and not this shadowy underground army of workers that are here today, gone tomorrow."

In polling news, the public is backing allowing the undocumented to earn citizenship:

The proposed Senate compromise also appears to have overwhelming support among voters. A new Washington Post-ABC News poll found that 63 percent of those surveyed backed letting immigrants who have lived in the country a certain number of years apply for legal status and eventually become citizens.

The Washington Post reports the fallout from the demonstrations over Sensenbrenner's no-sense bill may hurt Republicans in 2006.

The demonstrations are working. We need to keep them going until we get an immigration reform bill that protects the undocumented among us, allows a path to citizenship that doesn't require leaving the country and unreasonable hurdles, includes protections and benefits for workers and respect for families, civil rights and due process.

We also need to get rid of Sensenbrenner's plan to build hundreds of miles of border fences. On that and related topics, here's an excellent editorial from a University of Alaska newspaper I recommend to all.

No fences or laws imposing felonies and fines, which would cost millions of dollars in construction and court costs, will solve the problems caused by having a population that is made up of 11 percent illegal immigrants.

...In a country forged in the blood and sweat of Appalachian coal-miners, Midwest factory machinists, Great Plains farmers, Southwest ranchers and Southern migrant crop workers, it's hard to believe that there are jobs that Americans won't do. But we have only to remember our nation's history of slavery, child-labor sweatshops, chain gangs and Chinese rail-workers to know that this is true.

For Americans, a low-wage job is a step down on the ladder. For immigrants, it's a step up. The luxury that naturalized Americans now enjoy was purchased by our ancestors' hard work and fortitude. To deny others the chance to improve the lives of their children and grandchildren, we mark ourselves as astonishingly ungrateful.

The editorial continues, discussing Latinos:

Anti-immigration arguments improperly site Latino culture as a source of crime, vice, disease, increased government spending and gang violence.

To students who paid attention in History 102, these fears should sound very familiar. In the early parts of the 20th century, would-be immigrants from countries in Eastern Europe, having been "proven" inferior by the brave new world of eugenics, were packed back to their motherlands to face first Nazi, then Soviet occupation of their countries.

At that time, America adopted an immigration policy based on fear. So much for lifting our lamp to the world. But even while America looks back on this policy as an embarrassment to the ideals we strive to uphold, we find the same arguments being voiced again, a hundred years later, about a different immigrant group.

And then there's this:

A 14-year-old boy who took part in a student walkout on March 28 in Ontario, California--one of hundreds of walkouts around the country demanding immigrant rights--killed himself on March 30 after a vice principal at De Anza Middle School told him he would be punished for his truancy. The administrator said he could not attend graduation, his mother would be fined $250, and he could be jailed for three years, said attorney Sonia Mercado.

Soltero phoned his mother with the news, but before she could get home, he shot himself in the head using a gun his stepfather had hidden in the garage, leaving behind apology notes. "We have to let the schools know that they can't punish our children for exercising their rights," said his mother, Louise Corales, in a statement issued by Mercado. (Press-Enterprise, Riverside, April 8; Press Release from Civil Rights Lawyer R. Samuel Paz, April 7)

Legalization. It's the only way.

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  • Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#1)
    by BigTex on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 12:36:19 AM EST
    The individuals have the right to peacably assemble, but that right does not mean that they do not have to suffer the collateral effects of their actions. The workers weren't fired for peacably asembling. They were fired for missing work without authorization. The student wasn't punished for peacably assembling, he was punished for violating truancy laws. In the workers case there was no government action. Their right to peacably assemble wasn't quashed by anyone. Their right to peacably assemble doesn't mean that their employer has to give them the day off to do so. It only means that the government doesn't have the right to arrest them for assembling. With the student this was an act of civil disobediance. Civil disobediance can be honorable if the disobediant are willing to pay the price for their actions. Otherwise it is anarchy and totally ignoble. Exercise your rights is great, more people need to do so. But to complan about the collateral effects is dishonorable to an extreme.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#2)
    by Kitt on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 01:45:30 AM EST
    The student wasn't punished for peacably assembling, he was punished for violating truancy laws.
    The student wasn't punished (yet); he was threatened with punishment... "after a vice principal at De Anza Middle School told him he would be punished for his truancy. The administrator said he could not attend graduation, his mother would be fined $250, and he could be jailed for three years."

    I'll bet the repos are backin' off the felony bit. They saw the rallies. They see the polls. The bigot thing just ain't playin' like they thought it would. That's what they get for bein' a one-trick pony. To hell with 'em. They painted themselves into this corner. Let 'em live with the consequences. They wanna negotiate? Good. Let 'em come, cap in hand. It'll be good for 'em. After all, it's Easter. Let the repos be reborn as decent human beings.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#4)
    by Edger on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 05:20:21 AM EST
    The workers weren't fired for peacably asembling. They were fired for missing work without authorization. The student wasn't punished for peacably assembling, he was punished for violating truancy laws. BullS**T! These are excuses, Tex. Nothing more. Were you fired the last time you took a day off work? And don't give me that authorization crap. They were employees, and the kid was a student. Period. They are not slaves, chattels, or indentured servants.
    "Many of these issues are near and dear to our hearts and can have serious effects on our lives, but Wolverine cannot allow these issues to stop our business," Mr. Bonahoom said. "When a large number of employees leave on a particular day, we cannot service our customers, and this puts all of our jobs in jeopardy."
    More bullS**T... the only issue near to Bonerhoom's "dear heart" is making an example out of these people he dearly wishes were chattels. Does Bonerhoom know how to do basic arithmetic? When a large number of employees ARE FIRED on a particular day, Wolverine cannot service it's customers either. But maybe they can hire some more who will hopefully be so cowed by what happened to their predecessors who demonstrated on their behalf? Think so? I think Wolverine might be in for a surprise. Go ahead. Tell me they would have been fired or threatened with 3 years prison if they had gone to a pro-bush rally or any kind of repub support function. See if you can tell me that with a straight face. On second thought don't bother, 'cause I'll repeat what I just said - you're full of s**t on this.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#5)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 05:34:54 AM EST
    BugTex writes:
    It only means that the government doesn't have the right to arrest them for assembling.
    No, but it does have the right to arrest all illegal aliens.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#6)
    by fafnir on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 05:47:36 AM EST
    Lets be rational, shall we? Legalization is not the only way; it's a false choice. It didn't work in 1986 and it won't work today. The two things that will work are attrition through strict enforcement, and trade policy reforms that eliminate the economic need for workers to cross our borders illegally.

    And who was President in 1986? Who controlled the Senate? That's what I thought. Who's been in control of Congress for the last 11 years? Who's been mismanagin' the White House? Sounds like a job for Addition by subtraction.

    I agree firing workers who went to a demonstration on immigrants' rights does not violate the workers' freedom of assembly. But wasn't their attendance at the demonstration a concerted activity? Didn't that concerted activity concern wages, hours and terms & conditions of employment (Surely a reasonable National Labor Relations Board would see immigrant status affecting conditions of employment). So, if hunting for a violation of law, a case can be made that the discharge was an unfair labor proactice. But law to one side -- wasn't firing those guys just plain wrong?

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#9)
    by Edger on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 06:52:29 AM EST
    But law to one side -- wasn't firing those guys just plain wrong? And a blatant intimidation tactic, however much it is denied.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#10)
    by fafnir on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 06:56:18 AM EST
    The point, charlie, is that legalization did not work. The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 was established to stop illegal immigration from Mexico by "regularizing" about 4 million illegals, and criminalizing the act of knowingly employing an illegal alien. Moreover, neither the Dems or the Reps have been serious about enforcing the 1986 law. This is a bi-pandering problem. The Republican pander to illegals to help their corporate cheap labor agenda, and the Democrats pander to illegals for electoral windfall. Neither side is interested in honestly discussing the problems or solutions.

    But law to one side -- wasn't firing those guys just plain wrong?
    No. If you don't show up to work without approval, you can be fired. I know that if I decide that I have somewhere important to be and don't let my boss know, I risk being terminated. The right to peacefully assemble (within certain time, place and manner restrictions) means that individuals won't be tossed in jail for expressing their beliefs in rallies and protests. This doesn't extend protection to workers skip out on work. Same goes for students: if you're truant, regardless of the cause, you are in violation of truancy laws. Want to help out the position of immigrants? Stay in school, further your education. Protest and march after school. San Antonio protesters did it right--they waited until 5:30 to march.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#12)
    by Edger on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 07:20:08 AM EST
    San Antonio protesters did it right Somehow I find it difficult to see how your idea of the "right" way to protest should or would have made any difference to them, or been relevant in any way...

    Somehow I find it difficult to see how your idea of the "right" way to protest should or would have made any difference to them, or been relevant in any way...
    By right, of course, I mean they were able to conduct a march, get their media coverage and not miss school or work in the process. That's the "right" way to do it, edgar.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#14)
    by peacrevol on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 07:26:17 AM EST
    Same goes for students: if you're truant, regardless of the cause, you are in violation of truancy laws.
    Missing one day of school doesnt make you a truant. If I was given three years in jail and a $250 fine for every day of school I skipped in my youth, I would be in jail the rest of my life...and in debt the rest of my life probably. Unless this kid had missed many many many more days and was going to be punished anyway for missing one more day, whatever the reason, the punishment threat was rediculous. As for the workers, many work places in America, especially restaurants and hourly paying jobs, have rules about no call no show. One or two no call no shows and you will be fired. It's not all that outrageous to me that they were fired. The company does have a business to run. Although it does sound slightly suspicious to me that they told them they would be fired if they didnt show up to work. Kinda makes you wonder if they were trying to keep them from marching. But if they had a reason to think that most of their workers would have gone on strike, perhaps they felt they had to make that threat to be able to keep their business going on that day. In that case I can understand it (dont necessarily agree with it but I understand). Had it been my company, I would have made work optional on that day and offered holiday pay to all employees that showed up. Then I would have made them sign up to work so that I would know how many were coming. If you were slated to work and didnt, then you would have been fired. But that's just me.

    I wouldnt throw them in jail or fine them 250$ (unless they were habitual skippers) for missing this one day. I would say, however, that as most schools I'm aware of have rules about detention for skipping class, these kids are eligible for whatever punishment is typically dealt out. And if the school isn't strict about truancy, I bet I can guess how good of a school it is...

    I wouldnt throw them in jail or fine them 250$ (unless they were habitual skippers) for missing this one day. I would say, however, that as most schools I'm aware of have rules about detention for skipping class, these kids are eligible for whatever punishment is typically dealt out. And if the school isn't strict about truancy, I bet I can guess how good of a school it is...

    Posted by fafnir April 12, 2006 07:56 AM The point, charlie, is that legalization did not work. The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 was established to stop illegal immigration from Mexico by "regularizing" about 4 million illegals, and criminalizing the act of knowingly employing an illegal alien.
    So, you figure multiplying Elian Gonzales by 18-20 million is the way to go because that went off without a hitch, eh? Sure thing. You guys are on a roll. You're just ridin' the crest of a slump. I think we've seen enough of your act. It's time for the adults to take over again, thank you very much. Your services are no longer required.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#18)
    by Edger on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 07:47:23 AM EST
    That's the "right" way to do it, edgar. Chase... it's edger, not edgar. I guess you missed the whistling sound when my earlier comment went past your ears without going in. Oh, well.

    If those workers were dumb enough to ignore fair warning what would happen if they joined some stupid protest then they deserved to get fired. It's too bad even the ACLU would be hard pressed to glorify that situation with the meat workers. What good would it too for those who were told not to protest. They aren't worried about work. As if this is a indicator of what will happen to big business and things to come.America land of the free and home to the slave. What happens if they have work and no one came.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#20)
    by BigTex on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 08:06:15 AM EST
    Tell me they would have been fired or threatened with 3 years prison if they had gone to a pro-bush rally or any kind of repub support function.
    At my last job one no call no show was enough to get us on a final written warning. The cause of the no call no show didn't matter. Here, they were told in advance that they would be fired if they didn't show up for work.
    Employees had been notified orally and by letters posted in the plants that they would be fired if they missed work without authorization, the statement said.
    They had a choice to make. They were told both orally and in written form they could not miss without authorization. They made the choice to miss anyway. It's called personal accountablilty. They made their bed, now they need to lay in it.
    Anti-immigration arguments improperly site Latino culture as a source of crime, vice, disease, increased government spending and gang violence.
    Wow, such willful ignorance. Here in Texas, 4% of our $118 billion budget directly goes to education, healthcare and incerceration of illegals. We have latino gangs. People may debate the degree of crime, vice, disease, gang violence, and government spending, but to say that there is no latino crime, vice, disease, gang violence, or government spending is so facially flawed it's journalitically unethical.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#21)
    by Dadler on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 09:25:15 AM EST
    Tex, So in this case, capitalism should trump the excercise of the only thing freedom means in this nation. An evolved employer, who genuinely cared about his employees and his business in the LONG TERM, would've closed for a day and applauded these folks for standing up and acting like free Americans. Instead, money is more important than principle. This is a huge issue, it was a huge day of protest, and accomodations should've been made. Very Chinese Communist Party of them -- you can have your job and check, but you can't practice political freedom without retribution. That's the message.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#22)
    by Edger on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 09:38:15 AM EST
    Here, they were told in advance that they would be fired if they didn't show up for work. Right. The intimidation of them and anyone Wolverine might hire after firing them started even before the protest. Personally? If I was working there I would have replied to that by telling them to stuff the job. Dadler:
    An evolved employer, who genuinely cared about his employees and his business in the LONG TERM, would've closed for a day and applauded these folks for standing up and acting like free Americans.
    I agree. "When a large number of employees leave on a particular day, we cannot service our customers" is a lame excuse and even cowardly justification. Pure BS.
    When a large number of employees ARE FIRED on a particular day, Wolverine cannot service it's customers either.


    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#23)
    by squeaky on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 10:14:59 AM EST
    "Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Felonization of the Undocumented"
    Yes, but now they have really decided to clean up the streets: littering is on the table for felonization. Hey, the incarceration lobby has to see some results otherwise they would stop being so generous.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#24)
    by jimakaPPJ on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 11:50:50 AM EST
    et al - For those who don't understand, or who don't want to understand, let me explain something. The company in question was a meat packing operation. That's production line work. If enough people are missing, the line can't run, so the factory shuts down. Now, tell me why those who didn't want to protest should lose a day's pay?

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#25)
    by Edger on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 04:58:37 PM EST
    When a large number of employees ARE FIRED on a particular day, Wolverine cannot service it's customers either.
    And the whole place shuts down. I'd be quite pi**ed at the company doing this and expecting me to lose a days pay over their wanting to intimidate future hirees.

    Posted by JimakaPPJ April 12, 2006 12:50 PM
    et al - For those who don't understand, or who don't want to understand, let me explain something. The company in question was a meat packing operation. That's production line work. If enough people are missing, the line can't run, so the factory shuts down. Now, tell me why those who didn't want to protest should lose a day's pay?
    For the same reason those who protested get lousy wages, working conditions, benefits and get tossed on the scrap heap if they get hurt. Because life isn't fair. Now the shoe's on the other foot. It's what's known in the trade as irony.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#27)
    by Aaron on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 08:04:53 PM EST
    Hard to believe that wages for meatpacking workers have actually declined since the 1980s. But I guess not when you consider the fact that back then half the workers in the meatpacking industry were protected by unions, unions which went the way of the dinosaur during the Reagan era. These workers in Detroit are getting $10.35 an hour today, while back in 1982 the entry-level wage for these workers was $10.69 an hour. That was more than 20 years ago. Meat and Migrants Is it any wonder that most Americans aren't interested in these dead-end jobs. As far as the firing of these workers is concerned, it's totally reprehensible, and wrong and employers who engage in this kind of activity should be made to pay. Doing this kind of thing is tantamount to firing people for their political views, something corporate America would love to engage in. The whole criminalization of illegal immigrants and the people who helped them, and the people who employ them really is absurd. Unless of course you're an investor in the private prison systems of this country, then it would make perfect sense. Since we'd be talking about turning 30 million people into felons with their right to vote stripped from them and their ability to prosper in America harshly curtailed. Actually from a political perspective it's a pretty damn good move. You don't like a certain ethnic or racial groups politics, just brand them immoral criminals and disenfranchise them from society. After all, it is the American way.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#29)
    by jondee on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 11:41:41 PM EST
    Yes, the beatified-by-the-right St. Ron: the most monumentally fraudulent, one dimensional, give-it-to-the-American worker-up-the-wazoo, p.o.s of the last 50 years and the template for the even more deficient current cretin.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#28)
    by Che's Lounge on Wed Apr 12, 2006 at 11:47:41 PM EST
    Thank you Aaron. I'm so tired of corporate a*s kissing, cowards who would rather blame a powerless group than challenge the true domestic threats to our economy.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#30)
    by jondee on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 12:53:53 AM EST
    I saw a poll on cable show on which Reagan was voted the greatest American of the last 200 years. Whats that Green Day song; moron nation or something?

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#31)
    by Aaron on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 01:39:35 AM EST
    Our country's new obsession with illegal immigration is already leading to a shortage of laborers willing to do this work, and this problem is only going to get worse. Farm Labor Shortages Raise your hand if you want to go pick some lettuce.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#32)
    by BigTex on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 08:27:22 AM EST
    Raise your hand if you want to go pick some lettuce.
    What about the other option, willingness to pay 3x the current price for a head of lettuice. I could go for that because the supply and demand kink would be temporary.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#33)
    by kdog on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 08:41:04 AM EST
    I'll pick lettuce, at John McCain's offer of $50 an hour. I'll do it for $25 an hour plus benefits. Not for $5 or $6 an hour w/ no benefits. You'd have to be crazy...or desperate. That's where the immigrants come in...desperation.

    That's where the immigrants come in...desperation.
    kdog, ... maybe even felons? Just a thought...

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#36)
    by squeaky on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 08:54:44 AM EST
    Years ago, just after Russia changed from communism, I visited. I stayed with a emigree's ('74) part of her family that did not leave. He was a Doctor that worked in intensive care unit for infants with heart problems. His dream was to come to the US where he could make real money. His plan, since he would not be able to practice medicine here, was to pick blueberries. He had heard that in Maine you can make $5./hr picking berries. I was astonished.

    Macro, do you mean our prisoners will end up doing the work if the bastards really closed the border? I wouldn't put it past them.
    Well it was mentioned,...
    "I say let the prisoners pick the fruits," -Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of California
    ... however, I should have been more specific. I meant ex-prisoners. Felons to be specific. This is a group of individuals that may be desperate for work.

    So, Dana Rohrabacher thinks Abramoff, the dukester and toxic tommy should be pickin' our vegetables, eh? I see a movie. Oy, Brother, where art thou, already, and do you think you could insert a rider for our mutual friend....? Can't ya just see that trio shackled together hoppin' up and down through the Delta under that hot Mississippi Sun?

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#39)
    by jimakaPPJ on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 08:30:37 PM EST
    Jondee writes:
    I saw a poll on cable show on which Reagan was voted the greatest American of the last 200 years. Whats that Green Day song; moron nation or something?
    No, it was the National Anthem of the Left... "I can't get no satisfaction.... 'Cause you see I'm on losing streak I can't get no, a no no no Hey hey hey, that's what I say"

    The Stones are English, Jim. They were English in 1965 when that song was a hit. It was their first number one in the States. Mickey Mantle still played center for the Yanks. Simon and Garfunkel still knew Joltin' Joe's whereabouts. Eve of Destruction was a hit that summer. Except for the 21 year-old vote, not much has changed. It's just moved from the Eastern World to the Mid-Eastern World. Young people don't have to go as far to get killed for nothin'. That's thoughtful.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#41)
    by jondee on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 09:10:08 PM EST
    And Jim, showing his incredible acumen again, probobly agrees with the poll result. But, he's been on a losing streak since the Ns were officially declared our equal, and he didnt get to nuke the Rooskies or the gooks. Though, he's still holding out hope for the Iranians. Then he can die with a smile.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#42)
    by jondee on Thu Apr 13, 2006 at 09:13:13 PM EST
    Dylan got together with Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper to do something that year too.

    Yeah, and you know something is happening here but you don't know what it is Do you, Mr Jim!

    Nobody should be forced to choose between retaining the livelihood they have worked for or protesting against the ambitions of these fat, rich, white men in Washington: attempting to turn America's borders into a fascist police state fortification. Corporate wh*res shouldn't be on television with their frizzy hair and ridiculous make-up and outfits criticizing economically impoverished children walking out of public schools to protest against the government seperating their families / deporting their parents . ...and finally, if anyone is going to be lumped together and forcibly evicted from this country, it should be the racist redneck warmongers among you that support this kind of garbage.

    Re: Republicans Signal Willingness to Drop Feloniz (none / 0) (#45)
    by jondee on Fri Apr 14, 2006 at 09:57:32 AM EST
    Charlie - My favorite line: (maybe its just the way he sings it) You have many contacts amongst the lumberjacks to get you facts when someone attacks your imagina..tion.