home

TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences

28 juvenile offenders in Texas are leaving death row. Gov. Rick Perry signed the commutation orders today. He made it clear he was signing the orders only because of the Supreme Court decision 3 months ago banning the death penalty for those who are under 18 at the time of their crime as cruel and unusual punishment.

On a related note, Gov. Perry sure stuck his foot in his mouth when a camera caught him calling a reporter a "motherf**ker" at the end of a interview session. Crooks and Liars has the video. Perry has telephoned the reporter and apologized.

Update: The Houston Chronicle reports (June 22, 2005, available on Lexis.com):

Gov. Rick Perry thought he was off-camera, but a Houston television station caught the governor using an abbreviated version of a 12-letter word best left in the locker room.

Perry called the reporter on Tuesday and apologized for the "inappropriate" word.

The incident occurred Monday as Perry gave a series of interviews in preparation for a special session on public school finance. The governor refused to give details of a property tax cut plan that he was set to unveil on Tuesday.

KTRK (Channel 13) reporter Ted Oberg pressed him for details. "You'll have to wait until tomorrow. I hate to let you guys in on it and no one else," Perry said. After the interview ended, Oberg told Perry, "Try as I may, governor, I guess I can't win this one." About 20 seconds later, Perry repeated what he apparently thought Oberg had said, and then added his own touch.

"Try as I may, governor, I'm not going to wait that long. Adios," Perry said, adding an expression that's an abbreviation for a word - as Oberg said in his report - that "isn't something you want to say to your mother or use in good company."

< Detainee's Lawsuit Against Rumsfeld to Be Heard in D.C. Federal Court | Skippy's Blogathon - No Money Needed >
  • The Online Magazine with Liberal coverage of crime-related political and injustice news

  • Contribute To TalkLeft


  • Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#1)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    Gee. The feds telling the states what to do. Where are the Liberals defending states' rights on this one??

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#2)
    by DawesFred60 on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    One word..Good.

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#3)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    I've never understood how anyone could sentence a minor to be executed. Just unfathomable.

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#4)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    If you know that crooksandliars has the video I would suggest that you go and take a look at it. Then you might consider editing your post to reflect what the governor actually said. It is pretty plain and I cannot understand how you could have missquoted him so egregiously unless you have not bothered to view the video. Be sure to have your speakers turned on. [What 12 letter word do you think MoFo stands for, read the Houston Chronicle article I linked to]

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#5)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    There are some things individual states need a little help making policy on. The death penalty is one of those things. And it seems like Perry, despite his own personal feelings, is trying to do the right things. Except, maybe, for cursing out that reporter.

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#6)
    by ras on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    Here's a q for the lawyers here. Does cruel and unsual punishment mean just that: cruel and unusual punishment? Cuz if a punishment is just cruel (but not unusual), or just unusual (but not cruel), is it still banned? On the face if it, yes. If the Founders had intended to ban either cruel or unusual punishment, they would have said so. But I think they understood that all punishment is, by definition, cruel, at least to some extent. So they were careful in their wording, and correctly so. We all see examples, on occasion, of judges handing out unusual punsihments. These are not usually challenged, when they are not also cruel. Can we therefore assume that cruel punishments, if usual, are similarly immune to challenge?

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#7)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:25 PM EST
    Claxton writes, "There are some things individual states need a little help making policy on." How about medical marijuana? Is that one of those things too? How about concealed carry for retired cops? My point is that critics of the Bush administration are quick to defend states' rights, until it's an issue where they agree with the federal mandate, then their "principle" goes out the window.

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#8)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:28 PM EST
    Fight fJ- As one of those Bush critics, and a Leftist, I'll answer you. I may not believe in the death penalty, but I believe states rights trump my opinions on any issue that states have the right to determine. I also believe these issues should always be voted on by the citizens of that state.

    Re: TX Gov. Commutes 28 Juvenile Death Sentences (none / 0) (#9)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Sat Dec 17, 2005 at 01:00:31 PM EST
    Actually, FJ, you are incorrect...I'm not defending any state's rights, mainly because many states don't have a clue as to what's best for their people. The death penalty happens to be one of those things that I believe shouldn't be left to states. The only jurisdiction that should be allowed to administer death sentences is the federal government, and only for treason. In case you haven't been paying attention, the Supreme Court recently threw out a death sentence, for the second time, because Dallas County (TX) prosecutors have documented instructions to exclude blacks and other minorities inclined to oppose the death penalty from capital juries. Texas has a documented history of bias in capital cases, and that's one of the reasons behind Perry's signing of the life-without-parole bill.