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Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr.

I hope everyone will re-aquaint themselves today with the extraordinary words of wisdom, vision and passion of Martin Luther King, Jr. It takes only a minute to watch this video. It features excerpts from Dr. King's 1967 Vietnam War speech, and ends with an appeal to take part in a Global Day of Protest on the one-year anniversary of the Iraq War.

Alternet has an excellent compilation of some of Dr. King's most memorable quotes. Here are the links to the full text of just a few of his speeches.

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    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#1)
    by Darryl Pearce on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 09:33:01 AM EST
    I like this picture of the man.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#2)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 10:51:02 AM EST
    From the Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Oslo, Norway, Dec. 10, 1964. King was 35 when he won the Nobel Peace Prize:
    I still believe that we shall overcome.


    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#3)
    by Dadler on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 12:09:56 PM EST
    When I was depressed in college, which was just about every day, I'd go to the library and listen to records of King's speeches. To me, the most powerful has always been the "I've been to the mountaintop" speech he gave the night before he was killed. "I may not live a long life..." A true prophet.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#4)
    by kdog on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 12:22:43 PM EST
    My 6 year old niece made my day yesterday. She said she had off from school tomorrow (today) because of Martin Luther King Day. I asked if her teacher taught her who he was, and she said "he made America better." So true.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#5)
    by wg on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 01:58:54 PM EST
    Is it only me, or is this guy looming larger and larger with every passing year? Or could it be that we all, GOP-ers included, need to occasionally connect to something honest for change, something clean and moral, to take our minds off this administration and everything they stand for. -- This was a man they called the "most dangerous and effective negro leader in the country" and vowed to "take him off his pedestal." They hounded him mercilessly, like you hound a dangerous animal, but pedestal is still his, while his tormentors continue to operate in shadows, like rats or skunks, always afraid of being caught red-handed, afraid of having their methods exposed.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#6)
    by kdog on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 03:40:34 PM EST
    Very well said wg. Reading his speeches while listening to this, I am reminded of the good in man.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#7)
    by Edger on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 03:57:25 PM EST
    King was a true and a real man... and leader. The people who now lead the US aren't good enough to shine King's shoes, unfortunately.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#8)
    by Sailor on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 07:07:03 PM EST
    "I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.
    I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."


    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#9)
    by jimcee on Mon Jan 16, 2006 at 07:08:37 PM EST
    He was a truly great man and his speeches are as relevent today as they were at the time he made them. His last speech still gives me chills and brings tears to my eyes. It was prescient. I wish his family would allow open access to his images and words so that they could be used without a fee or permission by schools and individuals everywhere. Either way he was truly a great American.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#10)
    by Talkleft Visitor on Tue Jan 17, 2006 at 04:06:49 AM EST
    The letter from B'ham never fails to move me. So many life lessons from just one letter.

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#11)
    by jondee on Wed Jan 18, 2006 at 05:17:38 PM EST
    I dont know whether to laugh or cry when I see all the tributes pouring in from the right to MLK. If he were alive today and still politically active, there would be a "Swift Civil Rights Vets for Truth" group whipped together by those grotesquely rich bottom feeders in Texas and ppj would be filling thread after thread with the kind of slime and smears that would repel a bacterial colony. After all, King was one of the most prominant public figures to take an unequivocal stance against the Vietnam war,and - unlike the people who sent the soldiers there - "cost American lives by emboldening the enemy". Right?

    Re: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr. (none / 0) (#12)
    by Edger on Tue Jan 31, 2006 at 05:55:09 AM EST
    Coretta Scott King Dies at 78 Jan. 31, 2006 -- - Coretta Scott King, widow of slain civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr., has died. She was 78. Scott King was admitted to Atlanta's Piedmont Hospital on Aug. 16, 2005, suffering from a stroke that left her weakened on her right side, unable to walk, and barely able to speak. Coretta Scott was born April 27, 1927, on a farm in Heiberger, Ala. Though the family owned the land, it was often a hardscrabble life. The young Coretta, her sister, Edythe, and brother, Obie, all had to pick cotton during the Depression to help the family make ends meet.
    Reach out your hand if your cup be empty, If your cup is full may it be again, Let it be known there is a fountain, That was not made by the hands of men. There is a road, no simple highway, Between the dawn and the dark of night, And if you go no one may follow, That path is for your steps alone. --Grateful Dead